Water Changes

Yeti

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okay so I'm going to do anywhere in the vacinity of 20% - 50% of my 55gal as a PWC.. this will be my first PWC since ive had this tank (which hasnt been long at all) right now all I have is a pitcher and a 5 gal bucket.. my powerhead is in the mail, and Ill get a gravel vac when I get to it..

so once I removed this water, its time to add new water.. should I treat the water before putting it in or can I just add the water, then treat it? I have aquasafe which removes chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals from the water. also about temperature, should I just try to keep it as close to my tank temp as possible? I have a little thermometer that will measure the water coming from the tap on the spot.. so for me a few buckets of tap water, add the stuff good to go?

thanks!
 

Gargoyle

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Add the treatment to the bucket as you are filing it as it will mix better... Get the temp as close to the current temp of your tank water as you can.. Then fill away!!!

Just remember to treat each bucket full before you put it in your tank.. ;D
 

simpleton

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I agree. Treat the water in the bucket before adding to the tank. I use two, 5-gallon buckets for my water changes. One is for new water, while the other is for the old water. Once you get your gravel vac, you'll be able to siphon the old tank water into a 5-gallon bucket. It makes the water change process move much faster. I usually do 3 buckets weekly. That amounts to about a 40% water change for my 30-gallon tank. I have one bucket all ready to add to the tank once I've removed the old water. In fact, the first thing I do on water changes is get a bucket of fresh water all ready to add to the tank. Then I begin to use the gravel vac and siphon water out of the tank into the other 5-gallon bucket. This keeps the fish in a low water situation for a minimum amount of time.
 
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Yeti

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too bad it takes forever to get water FROM the 5gal to the tank...
 

simpleton

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I can actually do a thorough cleaning and water change in about 70-90 minutes...that includes scrubbing and rinsing the glass lid and the HOB filter. You obviously want to be careful with the filter as you should rinse it with aquarium water (not tap water) and try not to kill off any good bacteria and bio products. I wish I could get the new water into the tank faster but it's just the way it is when making sure you do a thorough job.
 

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I agree. I would treat the water in the bucket and then add it to the tank. When the MTS (multiple tank syndrome) sets in, you will probably need a python. That is what I use. With a python, you could probably pour the water into a bucket to treat it, but that would be so cumbersome. What most folks do, is add the conditioner to the stream of water going back into the tank. I can clean a 100 gal., a 55 gal. a 29 gal. a 20 gal. long, and a 10 gal. in about an hour.
 

simpleton

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I've never heard of the Python. I checked out the link and it looks pretty impressive. If I'm looking at it correctly and understanding how it works, you simply hook up to the faucet for intake and direct the the output through the tube into the drain. The object is to not have to carry buckets of water back-and-forth. Question: How do you regulate the water temperature for intake? This looks really cool!
 
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Yeti

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simpleton said:
I've never heard of the Python. I checked out the link and it looks pretty impressive. If I'm looking at it correctly and understanding how it works, you simply hook up to the faucet for intake and direct the the output through the tube into the drain. The object is to not have to carry buckets of water back-and-forth. Question: How do you regulate the water temperature for intake? This looks really cool!
what I would do is run the water from the faucet at the temperature you like and mark it on your sink and knobs so you know where to turn it to every time, use paint or sharpie or whatever makes you froggy. that way when you hook up your pipe-work you know the water coming into it is fine.. *shrug*
 

Gunnie

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You can stick a thermometer in the stream to check the temp before adding the water to the tank.  Some folks simply check it by touch.  I'm fortunate in that I live in Florida and hook mine up to the hose outside.  I can't adjust the temp that way, but the water stays pretty warm, and I can plan my water changes.  If it's a cool day, I usually do them during the hottest part of the day.  I do have times though when it's simply too cold to do a water change.  If you can, it's always good to add water of the same temp. back into the tank. I have been fortunate in that water being added back in was noticeably cooler than what the existing was in the tank. For some fish (like corys), this encourages them to spawn, and 2 days later, I've got eggs all over the front glass on the tank! We added a new faucet to our kitchen sink and I can no longer hook my python up to it.  The hose works fine for the most part, and my plants get some great fish and turtle water!    
 

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