Water change created more problems

FishCentral

Hi, I have a 30Gal tank with Tetras and a dwarf frog, undergravel filter, and plastic plants. This is near a window but doesn't receive direct sunlight. I recently did a 50% water change to combat out of control algae which I assumed came from excess food. This included vacuuming my gravel and washing the ornaments, and I'm concerned I overdid it.

After the change a white fuzz lay on top of the gravel (strings on the plants too) and consumed my frog and one of my Tetras. I quickly moved the remaining fish to quarantine, treated with a salt solution and cranked the heat up in the main tank. My concern is the vacuuming and/or new water removed or displaced too much of the existing healthy bacteria and the tank is basically starting anew. I treated with Seachem start up and tested the PH levels which read normal (7). Water is clear.

Here's my next steps but I'm wondering if someone could confirm if this is appropriate or I need to take other measures first:
- Remove/Rinse the plants
- scoop up fuzzy stuff as best as possible
- replace filtacarbs
- dial down the heater
- replace plants
- Does with Aqueon pure tank buddies
- reintroduce fish

Do I need to introduce new gravel?
I also have the fish in a 3 gallon temporary container with heater and air. How long is too long for them to be in there?

Thanks in advance for your responses!

Mike
 

BigManAquatics

As far as the 3 gallon, the sooner you can get them out the better.

For the rest, not really sure at all. Have been lucky enough to not have really had a big algae outbreak since i took the 1 tank away from the window and that outbreak was simple to solve.
 
Upvote 0

awilkinson871

What kind of algae was it? I will also say that undergravel filters aren't really that great. Small particles of food and poo get underneath and tend to ferment adding to ammonia and nitrates. High nitrates fuel most kinds of algae. I got rid on one years ago and was amazed at all the junk that was hiding under it. To know if you messed up your cycle you will need to test ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates.
 
Upvote 0

FishCentral

Thanks, I was skeptical of the undergravel filters but got talked into it, I might decide to change. The original algae bloom that started all of this was the brown stuff. I bought snails to help control but they never did much. My latest test didn't show any signs of high levels of either nitrites or nitrates but I'll keep monitoring.
 
Upvote 0

awilkinson871

I will assume the tank is newer. Brown algae is usually diatoms. They occur from high nitrates, high silica and/or high phosphates. It is really common after cycling a tank. Increase air flow and filtration and add some plants that suck up nitrates. It can also occur from inconsistent co2 or fertilization. I just added a double sponge filter to a tank with a HOB that wasn't adequate to help with diatoms. I have low nitrates but not enough water moving around makes for a perfect environment. If you want to clean off all the decor just use a bucket of tank water not tap water. You could probably scrub it in the tank and then vacuum up all the debris. You might wait a day or two since you just did a big water change.
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
3
Views
96
Flyfisha
  • Question
Replies
10
Views
314
ChimericalFish
  • Question
Replies
9
Views
164
JasperWard
  • Question
Replies
29
Views
235
The2dCour
  • Question
Replies
4
Views
82
Fwreef86

Random Great Thread

Top Bottom