Want To Build Stand But So Many Questions Before Starting

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

I do not yet have any fish but am already hooked. I am setting up a 20 gallon long tank and I got nitrite readings for the first time today!

The tank is currently on my floor, so I’d like to move onto a stand. I’ve been searching for a stand but most are expensive and have bad reviews and seemingly made of cheap material.

I’d like to take a shot at building my own stand. However, I have no experience with woodwork and construction.

I am considering following the instructions in this video:

Since I have no experience, I have several questions and concerns. Before I get started, can you answer my questions below?

  1. My tank dimensions are 30.25 x 12.5 x 13.0 inches (20 gallon long). I’d like to make my stand 30.75 x 13.0 x 37.0 inches. Many people who build their own stands seem to keep their stands shorter. Will making the height 37.0 inches compromise the strength of the stand?
  2. Which 2x4 should I use? Is there a specific type of wood to avoid? Are there certain qualities, such as a large number of knots, I should avoid? Or, can I just pick the nicest looking piece of wood?
  3. What is the purpose of a flat corner brace? Some users use them while others don’t.
  4. Is a miter saw the best tool to cut 2x4s? If I buy a tool, I’d like to use it for future projects (e.g. bookshelf) as well, so I’m looking for a versatile tool. I also want to add panels/plywood/doors/etc. and do not want to purchase several tools.
  5. Does adding too many screws compromise the strength of the stand?
  6. As mentioned, I want my stand to be more than a skeleton. I have to make the stand look nice. It will be in the living room. If I want to add shelves, doors, trimmings, and make it waterproof, do I need to plan for this prior to building the skeleton? Or, do I build the skeleton first (using the video) and worry about the additional add-ons afterwards?
 

tocandesu

I've built a stand similar to this, but I did add some panels to the sides.

1.) My stand is 36" tall and 12" wide and it's stable so 37" should work
2.) I used regular 2x4 and it works great.

Not sure about the rest, sorry.
 

sweendog87

1 No 37 should be fine that stand design is good DIY king is the man I just finished making one of his designs for my 180 gal the thing could hold a house
2 make sure you ask for structural timber like they use for houses make sure you pick the straightest one you can find this will. Help keep it straight and square with is important
3 for extra strength some use them just tI he safe u just used a lot of screws and thick string ones used for structural purposes
4 best thing would. Be a sliding compound mitre saw as it will be able to cut large peices of timber as well as every type of cut you will need for bookshelves and stands you will also will need a drill
5 no it makes it stronger steel is much stronger than timber that's why we use them
6 yes you will. Need to plan where you want your doors and line up your supports to fix them too also and shelves are easy just cut them to fit on top of the bottom external timber or screw L brackets to support them

Also you will Need centre supports if you want doors
And don't forget to make sure it's level and plumb
And add polystyrene sheets under to help with any imperfections in how flat and level it is
These are my opinions and from what iv learnt recently from my build good luck anyone that thinks they have better advice please help too more minds are better than one
 

California L33

By all means make your own stand if you want. Not enough people make their own stuff these days. I would point out that sometimes you can get free/cheap aquarium stuff on Craigslist.

But if you've got the DIY bug-

Building a strong stand out of 2x4s would be a fairly good starting project- turning it into a piece of furniture for your living room is another matter. You should see if a local community college has a woodworking class to give you the skills you need.

I've never build an aquarium stand, but have built stands for recording studio mixing boards that are almost as heavy. The important thing is to make sure you design it so it doesn't twist, wrack, or flex. That's what the corner bracing does.

The issue with building tall is that you're putting something very heavy on top of something relatively light, so even if it's strong, the center of gravity might make it 'tippy.' You can always attach the stand to the wall to make sure it doesn't go over, though.

I wouldn't use huge numbers of screws to hold it together. You need at least two in each connection so they can't act as pivots, but if you shoot eight or nine in you may split the wood. (While it's true the steel of the screws is stronger than the wood, if you 'swiss cheese' the wood you'll make the wood weaker and the wood is what's supporting the weight. The steel is just holding the wood together.) Personally, I drilled and bolted my mixer stands together with two 1/4" inch bolts reinforced with fender washers at each join. It's probably over-kill, but I wanted to make sure I didn't end up with very expensive equipment on the ground, even in the event of an earthquake.

You'll also want to use kiln dried, as opposed to green, lumber. This won't shrink as much.
 

ChiefBrody

Pre-drill all your screw holes first to prevent splitting. You'll need 2 cordless drills. One with a screw bit, one with a drill bit. Drill bit should be slightly smaller than screws. You don't have to go crazy with the screws, just space them out evenly and stagger them. Definitely watch and follow Joey's video. He knows his detritus (aquarium joke)! I made mine in a couple hours. It's pretty straight forward. The hard part is keeping your 2 boxes square but they make a corner vise for this purpose, I'd buy one they're worth it. Also remember to make it as high as you'd like for viewing. I say this because I wish I made mine taller but whatever. I didn't finish mine off with doors and trim work and probably saved $100 in stock right there. Just the frame so lumber and a box of screws if you got your own tools - I prolly spent less than $110
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Also as far as the threat of twisting: I've seen aquarium stands directly tied into the wall studs before and while I didn't do this on my large tank in the pic I think it's a valid approach for something smaller like a 40 breeder. Not a lot of screws just catch a couple to lock it in place in case it gets bumped into.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

I've built a stand similar to this, but I did add some panels to the sides.

1.) My stand is 36" tall and 12" wide and it's stable so 37" should work
2.) I used regular 2x4 and it works great.

Not sure about the rest, sorry.
Do you have any pictures you can share? When adding the panels, did you glue, nail, or screw them to the frame?
 

tocandesu


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It's not much, but it is screwed in.
 

FishFish221

1. Not really, but many people won't be able to reach their tank if they make it too tall.
2. Avoid treated wood.
3. More support
4. Well there are better saws that cost thousands, but a mitre saw would do. You could also use a circular saw, but I found those to be not very good at cutting straight lines.
5. A screw can hold about 70 pounds. There is no point in adding more than 2-3 screws.
6. Build it first. Without it, your stand would be basically useless. Strutural support is more important than anything else in a tank stand.
 

sweendog87

To eliminate twisting put extra cross supports on either side if the legs this will stop your legs from bowing and twisting o done it on the top And bottom like this

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And definitely pre drill your holes before screwing you don't want any spits

And those are just white grid ceiling sheeting I'm glue in for a cheap finish until I but some dressing timber and stain it for the exterior all up my stand cost my $160 Aus
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr


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It's not much, but it is screwed in.
Looks awesome..Are the sides the 2x4s used for the frame or pieces of wood you added on the outer surfaces of the frame for design?

1. Not really, but many people won't be able to reach their tank if they make it too tall.
2. Avoid treated wood.
3. More support
4. Well there are better saws that cost thousands, but a mitre saw would do. You could also use a circular saw, but I found those to be not very good at cutting straight lines.
5. A screw can hold about 70 pounds. There is no point in adding more than 2-3 screws.
6. Build it first. Without it, your stand would be basically useless. Strutural support is more important than anything else in a tank stand.
2. Is there a reason? I was going to get pressure treated wood because another video said it would prevent shrinkage?
6. Yes, I will build it first following Joey's video. I don't want to get too carried away since this is my first attempt. I'd rather have a hideous tank than have water on my floor

Several more questions I have come up with as I’ve been reading…I want to make sure 20 gallons of water don’t come crashing down in my apartment and it blends into the room

  1. My stand will be 31 inches long (tank is 30.25 inches long). If I were to use Joey’s build, the sides would have 5 inches of 2x4 (1.5 inches and 3.5 inches from the guide) on each side. For example, there would be 5 inches of 2x4, followed by 21 inches of openness, and 5 inches of 2x4 in the front view. Do I need guides to support the middle portion of the tank in the 21 inches of openness. If this is confusing, I can draw a picture.
  2. It looks like wrapping the tank is done using plywood. Does the thickness of the plywood matter? I am guessing it doesn’t since I doesn’t actually do any of the weight holding.
  3. I want to put a door in the front. For the front plywood, I’ll have to cut out a square/rectangle for the door opening. Is there any way to use a miter saw for this?
  4. When putting on the plywood, what should I use? Screws, nails, glue? Also, if I use screws or nails, are there places I shouldn’t screw into the 2x4 that can weaken the frame?
  5. Many people seem to not wrap the back. Is there a reason for this?
  6. The furniture in my living room is white. Is staining in white a possibility?
  7. Does plywood come sanded? Do I sand before adding any stain or paint?
 

FishFish221

2. Is there a reason? I was going to get pressure treated wood because another video said it would prevent shrinkage?
6. Yes, I will build it first following Joey's video. I don't want to get too carried away since this is my first attempt. I'd rather have a hideous tank than have water on my floor
2. You don't really need it, its not like the aquarium is in a bathroom or something.
 

ounderfla69

Pressure treated wood has chemicals that will leech out over time and is made for outdoor use only. Pressure treated wood is soaked in the chemicals which means it is not dried out fully. (t will shrink and may warp as its dried out.
 

sweendog87

Several more questions I have come up with as I’ve been reading…I want to make sure 20 gallons of water don’t come crashing down in my apartment and it blends into the room

  1. My stand will be 31 inches long (tank is 30.25 inches long). If I were to use Joey’s build, the sides would have 5 inches of 2x4 (1.5 inches and 3.5 inches from the guide) on each side. For example, there would be 5 inches of 2x4, followed by 21 inches of openness, and 5 inches of 2x4 in the front view. Do I need guides to support the middle portion of the tank in the 21 inches of openness. If this is confusing, I can draw a picture.
  2. It looks like wrapping the tank is done using plywood. Does the thickness of the plywood matter? I am guessing it doesn’t since I doesn’t actually do any of the weight holding.
  3. I want to put a door in the front. For the front plywood, I’ll have to cut out a square/rectangle for the door opening. Is there any way to use a miter saw for this?
  4. When putting on the plywood, what should I use? Screws, nails, glue? Also, if I use screws or nails, are there places I shouldn’t screw into the 2x4 that can weaken the frame?
  5. Many people seem to not wrap the back. Is there a reason for this?
  6. The furniture in my living room is white. Is staining in white a possibility?
  7. Does plywood come sanded? Do I sand before adding any stain or paint?
1. I joey states in another stand build video anything over 4ft long will need centre supports so you should be ok since yours is 3 but you can put 1 or 2 if you wanted to.
BUT if your tank has a bottom trim it's not as important as all the weight is distributed to the trim not the entire glass bottom
Go an watch all of joey's stand builds you will. Pick up heaps more info

2 ply does help with the overall structural integrity again joey explains this in most videos and there are different grade of ply from 5 mm up to 20mm structural ply used on concrete form work

3 you will. Need a power hand saw of skill saw or router. It will be diff doin it on a mitre saw

4 I would use liquid nails and a few nails or screws around perimeters to hold it that way you don't have too many nails to putting up before staining
And as for where to put them try and moss any screw in the frame and joins make sure your screwing or nailing into thick timber

5 the back of the tank is not usually seen so. I only finished off the front and left cover since my tank is in a corner

6 I haven't ever seen or used white stain I know you can get a light grey stain maybe go to your hard wear store and ask a professional about some products that will. Help give you this effect I like the idea.
Otherwise paint with a high gloss white paint with a proper undercoat so it will look really shiny

7 depends on the supplier but I would say you would need to give it a light sand with a fine grit sandpaper

Hope this helps it took me ages to get answers when I was asking so I'm trying to give you as much info that I found as possible while it's still fresh in my mind iv just spent the last few weeks asking everyone questions and watching every videos available good luck
And anyone that thinks I'm wrong please help as I'm not a proffesional stand builder I just want to help
 

tocandesu

Looks awesome..Are the sides the 2x4s used for the frame or pieces of wood you added on the outer surfaces of the frame for design?
Added for design
 

Onewolf

You want to purchase kiln dried Premium 2x4 studs. They should be about $3.50 each.

I use SPAX screws which do not require drilling pilot holes. I use 2.5" screws for attaching 2x4s.

A 31" wide stand should not require vertical center bracing but you could add horizontal center support beam. For attaching panels (I use 3/4" plywood) I screw from the inside.

Photos of my current stand build for a 40 gal breeder tank. It's 40" tall.
 

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ChiefBrody

Pressure treated had arsenic in it and your technically not ever supposed to use it indoors. I only use it if I have it lying around. I'd never buy it for a stand. I do buy the nicer Douglas fir tho. It's usually straighter

Mitre cuts are only necessary if you plan on doing finish work like the beautiful stand above that could go in a museum. Skill saw is fine if you can cut a straight line. If you're putting this thing in the garage/basement why bother? I never do, but then again I'm also a peasant so...
 

THE HABITAT

I built this stand for mt 55 and this stand for my 8.8 and they are both solid as a rock. The 55 I sprayed with a harbor freight air powered paint sprayer and the 8.8 I brushed with Thompson water seal ( the same stain I used on my farm style fence I have outside my house)
 

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Onewolf

Mitre cuts are only necessary if you plan on doing finish work like the beautiful stand above that could go in a museum.

The 40 breeder tank is going in my wife's sewing/crafts room and she requested that the stand look like a decent piece of furniture. Otherwise I would have painted the bare 2x4 flat black and called it 'good enough', but the oak veneer plywood, oak boards for the front, doors, trim wood, stain and polyurethane changed a $40 build into a $250 build. Happy wife, happy life.
 

ChiefBrody

Dude, you're an artist. Beautiful joinery right there
 

Onewolf

I installed the trim molding and just stained the cabinet Minwax "Espresso". Several coats of clear gloss polyurethane and it will be good to go....
 

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AsstToTheRegionalMgr

I installed the trim molding and just stained the cabinet Minwax "Espresso". Several coats of clear gloss polyurethane and it will be good to go....
Looks amazing! You mentioned that you screwed from the inside. How does that work? Wouldn't the pointy end stick out of the outer face?

Also, for the front , did you cut a single piece of plywood and cut out the center or are you assembling 4 longer pieces into a frame?
 

sweendog87

You can see the cuts and the grain of the wood changers directions so it's not one peice it's 4
And nice build maybe something bigger in the future???
 

Onewolf

Looks amazing! You mentioned that you screwed from the inside. How does that work? Wouldn't the pointy end stick out of the outer face?

All the exterior panels are 3/4" thick so I used screws that only penetrated the exterior panels by about 1/2". For instance going through 2x4 into 3/4" plywood is 1.5" + 0.75" = 2.25" so I used 2" screws. Going through two 2x4 into 3/4" panel = 1.5" + 1.5" + 0.75" = 3.75" so I used 3.5" screws.

Also, for the front , did you cut a single piece of plywood and cut out the center or are you assembling 4 longer pieces into a frame?

As mentioned the front/face is 4 pieces of red oak.

I like SPAX screws.

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AsstToTheRegionalMgr

Will a 7-1/4" miter saw cut the 2x4 just fine or should I look into a larger blade?
 

ounderfla69

Yes, that will cut 2x4. Get a it will help with cutting the wood straight.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

HI everyone,

Another question Thanks again in advance for the help!

Regarding the plywood wrapping - I will use a 3/4 inch thick plywood on the top just in case I switch to a tank without a rI'm in the future. I believe the plywood will provide additional support.

As for the back, sides, and front, does the thickness of the plywood matter? I'm guessing it doesn't since it provides no structural support..it's just aesthetics. I'm looking to do 1/4 inch because it's cheaper than the thicker pieces but if there is a benefit to the thicker pieces (1/2 or 3/4 inch), I'll go with it.

Also, there are a ton of wood types. Does anyone have any recommendations? Cheap, looks nice, waterproof (if possible) without much additional work is what I'm looking for.
 

DIYhack

HI everyone,

Another question Thanks again in advance for the help!

Regarding the plywood wrapping - I will use a 3/4 inch thick plywood on the top just in case I switch to a tank without a rI'm in the future. I believe the plywood will provide additional support.

As for the back, sides, and front, does the thickness of the plywood matter? I'm guessing it doesn't since it provides no structural support..it's just aesthetics. I'm looking to do 1/4 inch because it's cheaper than the thicker pieces but if there is a benefit to the thicker pieces (1/2 or 3/4 inch), I'll go with it.

Also, there are a ton of wood types. Does anyone have any recommendations? Cheap, looks nice, waterproof (if possible) without much additional work is what I'm looking for.

For something this size it doesn't matter really. Just pick something that looks nice. I don't really put a backing on either just the front/sides. I use finish nails too.

You don't have to use plywood anything works. Ck my 40b stand I made. It's just fence board & 2x4's.


IMG_1447.JPG
 

ounderfla69

If you use plywood use a hardwood like oak or maple the outer veneer is much nicer.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

If you use plywood use a hardwood like oak or maple the outer veneer is much nicer.
I called around for oak and that stuff is expensive. I don't know what is what so I will decide after viewing the plywood.

One place had Chinese birch for for $32 (1/2 inch). This is significantly cheaper than most cuts I asked about across multiple stores. Is this a bad quality food even though it's birch, which seems commonly used.

Also, how's pine and luan?
 

ounderfla69

You can see the quality of the veneer but I can't tell you how well it is laminated and how well it will stay laminated. If you use it make sure you seal it well especially the edge. $32 isn't all that cheap for 1/2 inch, I know 3/4 in from washington state is $50 at home depot.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

Is there something I should be looking for to see if it's a good piece? Is it based on feel, shininess, smoothness?

Also, seal as in making sure that each edge of the skin makes a flush contact, right?

I'm in NYC where I had a bacon,egg,cheese for $8 today. (I didn't know it was $8 until I went up to pay).

After I put the tank together, I'll check out home depot in NJ where they have more options. A reason I'm considering paying a local hardware store is because I don't have a tool to cut the plywood.
 

Wraithen

The home depot cuts are ugly. DO NOT get your pretty parts cut there. You're honestly better off with a hacksaw and sanding.

When he said seal he meant with the stain or paint you're using.

And a small misconception about plywood on the sides and front. It actually provides a ton (figuratively) of structural support. It's one of the best ways to prevent warping and twisting. I built a chicken coop kind of shack in Iraq with a buddy of mine with spare wood so we would have a shaded area to smoke. The frame was twisting constantly while we were putting up the rafters. After we put up quick 1/2 in plywood walls that thing would support an entire platoon. (It was only an 8 x 8 footprint.) We used the second story to see over the barriers to know when big sandstorm were imminent. That day I learned the value of plywood. It won't help much in vertical load bearing, but it will prevent swaying and twisting.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

I went to home depot today and bought some plywood. I bought kiln dried douglas fir. There was also a wood that was kiln dried heat treated. Is heat treated ok as well? It looked nicer and had less knots so I might go for that in that future.

Also, they surprisingly had no wood screws. I looked for #8 2 1/2 inch wood screws and they had packets of two. Do wood screws have another name?
 

ChiefBrody

Exterior screws

They usually have a gray coating on them. Drywall screws are black and aren't coated. Either one will work but exterior are more water resistant in the event of a leak etc

If you lay the whole sheet of plywood against a wall you can carefully cut it with a circular saw. Ripping them down on a table saw is more trouble than it's worth. Just mark it with a pencil and follow the line. When picking out lumber I like to aI'm down a corner of each piece and make sure they're all straight. Try not to buy "banana boards" but if there's nothing else available you can use a few of them for shorter cuts

Luan is . It hard to cut clean and it's paper thin. Not at all structural. Birch is what joey used in the video. Definitely best bang for your buck. Cleans up well
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

Exterior screws

They usually have a gray coating on them. Drywall screws are black and aren't coated. Either one will work but exterior are more water resistant in the event of a leak etc

If you lay the whole sheet of plywood against a wall you can carefully cut it with a circular saw. Ripping them down on a table saw is more trouble than it's worth. Just mark it with a pencil and follow the line. When picking out lumber I like to aI'm down a corner of each piece and make sure they're all straight. Try not to buy "banana boards" but if there's nothing else available you can use a few of them for shorter cuts

Luan is . It hard to cut clean and it's paper thin. Not at all structural. Birch is what joey used in the video. Definitely best bang for your buck. Cleans up well

Are either one of these fine?
 

Onewolf

I would recommend T-star head screws like these:

They are much easier to screw in than Philips head screws and the t-star bit comes in the box. I've never split any wood when using Spax screws and I never drill pilot holes.
 

Wraithen

AsstToTheRegionalMgr did you find a home depot person and ask them? I've had to swallow my pride a few times in there and ask for directions. I'm usually an aisle off, but sometimes across the store from what I need. If you only saw 2 packs I'm guessing you were about 3 aisles away from where you wanted to be. The boxes are usually with deck materials for what you're looking for.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

Yup I asked. I always let them know I am new to this and need help

I went fifteen minutes before closing and found the wood screw section with the employees help. Since I couldnt find any I needed, I asked if I could use any other kinds and he said only "wood screws". I would've asked another employee because more often than not, another employee will find it. But everyone was about to leave.
 

Letsfish


IMG_0268.JPG When I built mine I used 2X4`s for the frame,. birch plywood for the top,shelves and panels and clear pine for the trim I stained it a dark Kona and wiped the panels for high lights but left the trim darker.I use 3" #25 torks decks screw for the frame and a Pass Load trim nail gun for the rest.Also a compact impact driver works great for driving screws.Here is a pic before the doors went on
 

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BQuick

So I recently built a stand for Marrinelands 38 gallon bow front aquarium. I was going to use 2x4's but instead used 2x2's. the stand has been up for 2 months and does not move an inch. With your plywood lowes should have 15/32" ply pre-sanded sheets 4'x8'. I would not recommend having them cut it in store. Get a decent circular saw and a 4 foot level and some clamps to hold the level in place. Then just put your measurements onto the plywood and secure your level with the clamps onto the plywood. While doing this make sure that you have the circular saw on the top of the plywood to see how far you will need to move the level away from the line so the plate on the bottom of the circular saw sits flat on the plywood. As for securing it to the frame, I went onto amazon and got a cheap brad nailer for $30 and assorted brads to fit the nailer for $6. This is if you have an air compressor. If not you can buy brad and hand nail them. The brads that
Fit in the nailer are different than brads that you hand nail. I used 1x2 finished boards for trim and put two coats of polyurethane onto the entire stand including the inside. For the door you can use edge glued panel board as it gives a cleaner look than unfinished edges on plywood. I used 2" screws to hold the entire frame together. Also if you have a power drill look into getting a coutersinking bit as the plywood will crest a seamless edge when nailed to the frame. They also give a less chance of spiltting the wood. Also use a drill bit then the countersinking bit then the screw.
Thanks for reading this book but only trying to help you. Good idea on building your own also. Makes it look how you want it to look.
 

ChiefBrody

Bingo. Grip-rite #8 last screws you'll ever need to buy. Good for anything and work with any standard Philips head bit so no searching for weird bits. I always buy the same stock so I always have compatible leftovers.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

So I bought the Spax screws. Unfortunately, I still have to do pilot holes. I think it's because my drill sucks.

I built the top and bottom rectangle frames and it's not going as I wanted. There were a few screws that got stuck midway that I couldn't take out. I managed to hammer one in but it split the wood.


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At another corner (s), the screw got stuck but I managed to break it with a hammer. Then I drilled right next to it and got the second screw in. In the photo, the screw that I managed to break off is above the top screw.


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Will either of these cause issues? If they are still okay to use, should I use the split one on the top or bottom?
 

Wraithen

They should be ok. What do you mean the screw gets stuck? Is your drill just stopping? If tjhats the case you can use a hand screwdriver.

Ok, I don't want this to come off as mean, but you have to push into the screw with more force when you are turning the screw. This prevents the bit from jumping in the screw. The bit is harder than the screw and every time it jumps or slips it takes material from the screw, making it more likely to slip again until your screw head looks like a square opening instead of a cross.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

They should be ok. What do you mean the screw gets stuck? Is your drill just stopping? If tjhats the case you can use a hand screwdriver.

Ok, I don't want this to come off as mean, but you have to push into the screw with more force when you are turning the screw. This prevents the bit from jumping in the screw. The bit is harder than the screw and every time it jumps or slips it takes material from the screw, making it more likely to slip again until your screw head looks like a square opening instead of a cross.
I start drilling and the screw goes in about 2/3 of the way. Then it just stops spinning.

Thanks for the advice. Not mean at all. I learned that and now I am pushing down as hard as I can when drilling and it's working better.

Also, when I press down on one of the corners, I can tell that it's slightly off balance. When pressing one corner, the opposite corner will rise just a teeny bit. How can I rectify this?
 

Wraithen

The screws will do that for you. Or are you talking about the stand being off balance?
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

Yes stand is slightly off balance. Very slightly. I realized it's because the room I built it in is off balance.
 

Wraithen

Do you mean it leans? Most rooms lean a slight amount towards the middle over time. If that's the case it isn't square. You need the top of the stand to be pretty level. Any issue is magnified with the weight of the water in the tank. You can either redo it or shI'm it by placing something under the non level parts.
 

AsstToTheRegionalMgr

I worked on the frame today and am seriously considering redoing the entire project for the following reasons. Do you think it's necessary to redo everything?

1. As mentioned above, there is a split on the rectangle top/base. I haven't decided which will be the top of bottom.

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 6.11.09 PM.png

2. As mentioned above, there are a few places where a screw was intentionally broken off and a new screw was put right next to it.

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 6.11.17 PM.png

3. Because I didn't build the thing on a level surface, the structure seems to lean/off balance as well.

4. I screwed in the "guides" (term used in Joey's video) to one of the rectangle frames (frame A). When I put the other rectangle frame (frame B) at the other end of the frame A, the guides didn't really line up. To make sure the guides got screwed flush to the unscrewed frame B, I used a block in addition to the clamp like below to keep the guides straight.

Screen Shot 2017-08-27 at 1.41.41 AM.png

After screwing that, I went to screw the guides on the other end of frame B.The gap is pretty big. I'm sure I could push the guides to get it screwed but I am concerned that the frame will weaken over time since the 2x4s will always be trying to "pull away" from the screws.

Screen Shot 2017-08-27 at 1.44.31 AM.png

5. I did my measurements correctly but because there were a lot of misalignments during the assembly, the supporting blocks (the 8 pieces screwed to the 4 guides) actually don't fit snugly. It's actually short so the only option is to cut new pieces that'll fit snugly or jam some 2x4 scraps to make sure it's snug.

As you can see, there are several issues. Do you think it's better to just build something new and use what I made for something else? Or, is this still safe to use for the tank?
 

ChiefBrody

Seriously that guy probably works for spax screws company. They're no good. Reinventing the wheel. Just get exterior screws or decking screws and a drill bit. It's tedious I know but you can't argue with success or the convenience of not having to track down those starhead bits. They ruined durock screws by switching them to starbit. It's a racket. Don't buy into it. You'd be done with the build by now. It's only a couple hours of assembly
 

ChiefBrody

You can absolutely shI'm the legs if your cuts were off. In the future when cutting wood decide if and when to "cut the line" or "leave the line" respectively. All those supporting legs sould be cut strong and tapped in with a hammer. Don't worry about it for now and jam a shI'm in there but remember you can only send it in 1"5/8 as that's the width of a 2×4 so you might have to cut the shI'm in half for the desired effect. And don't buy shims in a package called "shims" use cedar shingles they're wider. You can probably snag a few out of a loosely bound package
 

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