Vet Says To Use Untreated Tap Water?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Disease' started by jojomo91, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    I am currently giving a medicine to some fish in a hospital tank and my vet says to not treat my tap water with Prime just incase it would interact with the med. She said it is completely safe to do. Is this unheard of? This treatment requires daily water changes of 50% before redosing.
     
  2. Oarngesi

    OarngesiValued MemberMember

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    Does you water have chlorine? Maybe guy some 5gal buckets and let the water stay out over night to get rid of the chlorine
     
  3. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    I would assume so? No way of testing chlorine, chloramines ect.
     
  4. Jocelyn Adelman

    Jocelyn AdelmanFishlore VIPMember

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    I get that it could react, but if your water has chlorine/chloramines in it I wouldn't....
    Assuming it's a smallish qt tank? I would set out the water in buckets before and treat it, usually any meds or anything else that can be negated by prime is safe to dose 24hrs after prime... if you fill the buckets you can do your wc, then refill and treat, rinse and repeat....
     
  5. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlackFishlore VIPMember

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    I would assume the vet knows both the med and the water. I wonder if the binder in Prime is what causes the concern.
    If you have chloramines, it could be dicey, but possibly what you are treating for is worse. My water has simple chlorine, and I haven't used a dechlorinator on a regular weekly water change in years. If you go up around 50% water changes, that is the edge of safe. I usually stay around 30% (and dechlorinate if I go more).
    If you have well water, you never need Prime.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    Yeah I'm really unsure what to do. I suppose do what the vet says!
     
  7. JamieXPXP

    JamieXPXPWell Known MemberMember

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    i think it would be even more harmful to not treat the water. many people treat their water while using meds with no issues
     
  8. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlackFishlore VIPMember

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    We have no idea what the med is, or whether the OP has chloramines. Without that info, we're guessing.
    The vet isn't.
    As well, there are water treatments without binders. Prime could be the problem, in ways that other treatments wouldn't be. If the OP only asked about Prime, I could see a vet taking a quick look at the website, knowing the med, and saying not to use the product. Or not. With luck, the vet's an aquarist and knows his/her local water.
     
  9. JamieXPXP

    JamieXPXPWell Known MemberMember

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    true
     
  10. Mushishi

    MushishiWell Known MemberMember

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    Well lets solve this then. What medication are you using?
     
  11. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    Oxytetracycline. She said to use Prime is it makes me comfortable but recommends against it bc of possible reaction.

    My tap is 1-2ppm Ammonia I know that off the top of my head so I can't use nothing. Maybe another product?
     
  12. _IceFyre_

    _IceFyre_Well Known MemberMember

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    I have no idea if your vet knows their stuff when it comes to fish or not, but keep in mind that most vets don't have fish amoung their regular patients.

    I personally think the almost guaranteed risks of ammonia on your fish are greater than a possible reaction. If you decide to go ahead without prime, I reccomend leaving the water out overnight first, this allows chloramines (but not chlorine) to evaporate if I remember correctly.
     
  13. FishFish221

    FishFish221Well Known MemberMember

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    Its the opposite.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    I'm going to use a a dechlorinator regardless. Not sure which but I'll use one.
     
  15. California L33

    California L33Well Known MemberMember

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    Why not ask if Prime can be used with antibiotics over on the Seachem forum? You'd think they would know. Or you can use the 'ask a question' feature at the Prime webpage. Seachem - Prime

    Does your vet know your water is 1-2ppm ammonia? If she's responsible and educated I doubt she'd advise you put fish in that, and she may have an alternative solution. You can also call your water company and find out how the water is treated. If it's chlorine it'll evaporate in a few days if left in an open container. If it's chloromine that won't work. You could also figure it out yourself with test strips that measure chlorine, though ammonia will be your biggest problem.

    My personal experience with antibiotics and Prime- no interaction, at least none that prevented the antibiotics from working. However it was NeoPlex (Neomycine), not Oxytertracycline, so this may be a comparison of apples and oranges.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    I'm not sure what's going on now.

    I guess I need to do some thinking.
     
  17. Mushishi

    MushishiWell Known MemberMember

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    I am finding no adverse reactions between any of the ingredients of either Oxytetracycline and Prime. The only noted interaction with Oxytetracycline is penicillin, which of course you wont be putting in your tank. The damage chlorine can cause to your fish isn't little so I REALLY don't advise using untreated water. It will only kill your fish faster. I am no vet, nor chemist, but I have been reading this since you posted and NOTHING is popping up as a red flag.
     
  18. Susiefoo

    SusiefooWell Known MemberMember

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    Can you get some bottled water? It would solve the ammonia problem and the dechlorinator dilemma. It might be cost prohibitive for regular use in your big tank but for a small hospital tank you wouldn't need too much.

    I have to say, the way your vet phrased it - "use it if it makes you feel comfortable" "recommends against it because of a possible reaction" - suggests to me she does not know for sure if it does or does not interact. And possibly does not fully realise the implications of chlorine and 2ppm ammonia on fish. (I'm a hospital doc and know hedging phrasing when I hear it. It's no criticism of your vet - as a previous poster pointed out, most are not aquatic specialists and rarely see fish). I would second the advice to check directly with Seachem who will know their own products inside out.
     
  19. OP
    OP
    jojomo91

    jojomo91Well Known MemberMember

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    Yes I totally can't afford bottled water even just for this treatment. I have to do 50-75% WCs in a 30 gal ten times.

    I have never done a water test the day after a WC, I really need to do that tonight to see how quickly my filter gets me to 0 ammonia.
     
  20. Susiefoo

    SusiefooWell Known MemberMember

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    Fair enough, that's a lot of water.

    I would contact Seachem then.
     
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