Venus Fly Traps

JamieXPXP
  • #1
does anyone here have any experience with these plants? ive ordered some seeds and I am trying to gather as much info as possible before they arrive which won't be for about a month or so. I figured I would try here first since the people are nice xD
 
Rainbows and Fishes
  • #2
They need to grow in a nutrient poor environment like peat (fertilizers can and do kill these plants). Make sure the media is sterile I would suggest sowing inside of a plastic container or in a pot in a plastic bag. Don't bury the seeds keep them moist and warm, preferably at 70 F or higher. Have patience, these seeds can take a month or more to germinate. They require minimum feeding so resist the urge to overfeed the traps. They also require a dormancy period so if your zone is warm enough you can bury them or put them in a garage or something, otherwise you'll have to attempt to winter them for a couple months in the fridge. Hope this helped
 
Jellibeen
  • #3
I have a number of carnivorous plants, though I haven't grown any from seeds.

-a blend of one part sand to one part peat is an ideal substrate.
-water is very important. Use only distilled, RO, or collected rainwater. Filtered water will still have too many minerals. The minerals build up in the soil which is detrimental over time.
-full to part sun. Since fly traps grow in bogs with poor soil, there aren't many large trees or other plants blocking the sunlight.
-They need soil that is always wet. An easy way to do this, and the method I use, is called the water tray method. Put a pot with holes in the bottom inside a larger pot or a plastic saucer. Fill the outer pot or plastic saucer with water. Make sure there is always water in the tray. Flytraps require less water than other carnivorous plants, so the water level in the tray should start at about an inch. I add water once it has evaporated down to a quarter inch or so.

I absolutely adore my carnivores and am always happy to talk about them!
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
ok so I have finally found somewhere that sells carnivorous plants locally and picked up a venus fly trap!
I might plant it in just peat moss with organic soil with nothing in it but not too sure and still need to pickup some distilled water so I temporarily used my well water to water it with and seems to be doing well so far. I will pick it all up tomorrow since I have to go into town anyways but luckily I have planters I can plant it in XD


IMG_20180602_153726.jpg
 
Jellibeen
  • #5
He looks good! I love fly traps. They’re so personable. I’m glad you were able to find some locally.

Potting soil isn’t a good choice. Can you get sand or perlite?

A little bit of well water won’t be so bad. It’s a buildup of minerals over a long period of time that is harmful.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
ive always wanted a flytrap they are my favourite carnivore plant. But exotic plants are hard to find here. How are they personable?

although my mom has a thing about always wanting to feed it.

I might be able to get sand or perlite if not then would only peat moss work?
 
Jellibeen
  • #7
It would be best if you could get some sand mixed in. Peat moss holds water differently.

I find them personable cos they look like they have little faces

If you ever do want to buy carnivorous plants online, Carnivorous Plant Nursery is the best.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Alright I will see if they have some plain sand when I go tomorrow.

Haha that's true they do look like they have faces.

I will have to take a look at that website then! I hope they ship to Canada lol
 
bitseriously
  • #9
That’s a beautiful, healthy-looking flytrap plant! Being also in Ontario, may I ask where u bought it? I’m also looking to start a carnivore pot, and would happily start with one like yours.
 
Sarah73
  • #10
Remember to buy some flies and put them in the venus's mouth. They will shut their mouths quickly.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
That’s a beautiful, healthy-looking flytrap plant! Being also in Ontario, may I ask where u bought it? I’m also looking to start a carnivore pot, and would happily start with one like yours.
I'm not sure what its called but I found it in a plant store in peterborough. it was my first time there but next time I go I will let you know the name of it! all of them looked pretty healthy and had other carnivorous plant species as well.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
I'm not too worried about buying flies especially around this time of the year. I always get an invasion of flies and mosquitoes from letting the dogs in and out
 
bitseriously
  • #13
Thanks, but...
I never get out Peterborough way. My loss, I know.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
I live only an hour or so away so I go every once in awhile. hopefully you will be able to find somewhere near you that carries them. these plants are surprisingly hard to find in ontario
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Ok I've managed to get everything for the plant today! Although they didn't have any peat moss they had an alternative
 
Jellibeen
  • #16
Hmm, the only issue I potentially see is the pH of coconut is much higher than peat. For most plants this is good, but since fly traps come from bogs they like a lower pH. Did the plant come planted in substrate?

I don’t mean to overload you with info. I’m a plant geek. I think these things are the difference between having a plant do okay and having a plant thrive, not the difference between life and death.

You won’t need to buy flies. They only need a few a month. It’s so fun to watch them catch things! I like feeding them stuff I find as well. I have been known to feed them the occasional
pest snail. They don’t break down the shell but they do digest the insides.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
Yes the plant came with some substrate but not a lot.
Oh I have some pest snails I can feed them occasionally.

It's alright! The more info I can get the better lol especially since it's my first flytrap.

Would the pH make that much of a difference? Also should I rinse the coconut if I do use it?
 
Jellibeen
  • #18
I can't say for sure how much of a difference it would make, but I can say that the pH for carnivorous plants is important.

I have talked to growers who use lime (not the citrus fruit) to lower the pH of coconut, but this is not something I have ever done before.
 
bitseriously
  • #19
I have talked to growers who use lime (not the citrus fruit) to lower the pH of coconut, but this is not something I have ever done before.
Jellibeen can you clarify or expand on this, or maybe double check your source/recollection? I’m asking w the utmost respect, as I know nothing about carnivorous plant care.
Lime in hort or agricultural context is dolomitic lime, or limestone, and it raises pH, not lowers. So it makes the soil more alkaline, or less acidic. It’s the aquarium equivalent of adding crushed coral. This would be the opposite of what an acid-loving plant like vft would want. Or, am I missing something?
 
Jellibeen
  • #20
Jellibeen can you clarify or expand on this, or maybe double check your source/recollection? I’m asking w the utmost respect, as I know nothing about carnivorous plant care.
Lime in hort or agricultural context is dolomitic lime, or limestone, and it raises pH, not lowers. So it makes the soil more alkaline, or less acidic. It’s the aquarium equivalent of adding crushed coral. This would be the opposite of what an acid-loving plant like vft would want. Or, am I missing something?

Yup, you are right! My mistake. I have talked to growers who used something to lower the pH of coconut, but I recalled incorrectly what it was. Like I said, it’s not something I have done. Thanks for catching that!
 
bitseriously
  • #21
LOL, sometimes its so hard to keep it all straight. Raising pH lowers acidity. Who agreed to this system in the first place?
Sulphur is a common pH lowering agent in gardening applications, indoors or out. It can be bought as a powder or in pelletized form.
 
Jellibeen
  • #22
Obviously, changing the soil parameters is not my strongpoint. I do know that peat moss is all I have ever used and has been most recommended in the books I have read.
 
JamieXPXP
  • Thread Starter
  • #23
Yeah peat moss is definitely one of the most recommended substrate got carnivorous plants
 

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