Using Old Filter Media In New Filter

CrisisQuaid

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Hey! I have a cycled filter that has been running for a while in my tank. I have to get a new filter to accommodate my eel so he can’t escape. My question is, if I put the old media in a new filter, will it run as if it is cycled for the most part? Will there be any drawbacks? I’m getting a Cascade 1000.
 

DuaneV

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Yes. HOWEVER, if your new tank is far more stocked than your old tank, you will see a spike in ammonie and nitrites until the BB catch up. But in general, as long as things are similar, yes.
 
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CrisisQuaid

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DuaneV said:
Yes. HOWEVER, if your new tank is far more stocked than your old tank, you will see a spike in ammonie and nitrites until the BB catch up. But in general, as long as things are similar, yes.
So how should I deal with this? Water changes every few days? How long will it take to catch up?
 

Dakotablue

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Depends on how much more bioload there is now compared to before. Ideally you would gradually increase the bioload so the BB can grow as you do. Is that an option?
 
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CrisisQuaid

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Dakotablue said:
Depends on how much more bioload there is now compared to before. Ideally you would gradually increase the bioload so the BB can grow as you do. Is that an option?
Not exactly, I have to order these fish, so if I get them as I go I’d be paying $40 extra to ship them in groups.
 

maggie thecat

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Are you only changing the filter to make the tank more escape proof or are you changing the tank stock by a substantial amount?

If it's the first and all other factors are the same, you aren't installing new substrate as well, then you really don't need to make other changes. Bacteria multiply exponentially .

If you are making a significant stocking change, then you should moniter your water parameters and do water changes, add additional Prime, as your numbers dictate.
 
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CrisisQuaid

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maggie thecat said:
Are you only changing the filter to make the tank more escape proof or are you changing the tank stock by a substantial amount?

If it's the first and all other factors are the same, you aren't installing new substrate as well, then you really don't need to make other changes. Bacteria multiply exponentially .

If you are making a significant stocking change, then you should moniter your water parameters and do water changes, add additional Prime, as your numbers dictate.
Before I had just the eel, in a few days I’m getting the eel, and 6 new fish, how long should it take for the Bacteria to multiply enough?
 

maggie thecat

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Hmm. How big is your tank again? The Cascade 1000 is rated up to 100 gallons, but discus require very clean water from what I recall. You might want to eel-proof your first filter and run in tandem or get a large corner sponge filter, if you are pushing your stocking limits.
 
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CrisisQuaid

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maggie thecat said:
Hmm. How big is your tank again? The Cascade 1000 is rated up to 100 gallons, but discus require very clean water from what I recall. You might want to eel-proof your first filter and run in tandem or get a large corner sponge filter, if you are pushing your stocking limits.
It’s a 75 gallon, I have tried eel proofing my other filter, but there are so many holes, last time I surrounded it in mesh, and tape but the little guy found a hole in the back and got out.

maggie thecat said:
Hmm. How big is your tank again? The Cascade 1000 is rated up to 100 gallons, but discus require very clean water from what I recall. You might want to eel-proof your first filter and run in tandem or get a large corner sponge filter, if you are pushing your stocking limits.
I’m willing to do waterchanges, just don’t know how many I should be doing, and how long it’ll take until the filter is acting normal.
 

maggie thecat

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I would definitely add a second filter, a big corner sponge, and keep a close eye on your parameters. Better safe, and all that.

The filter will be "normal" as soon as soon as you plug it in and start water pumping through it. The bacteria will populate the new media as the bioload increases.

My concern is discus require pristine water, and I have a feeling, based on reading, not experience, that you are going to be pushing the limits of their tolerance because of the tank size.
 

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CrisisQuaid said:
I’m willing to do waterchanges, just don’t know how many I should be doing, and how long it’ll take until the filter is acting normal.
The only way to really know is by testing the water. We can guess as to when it is time to do a water change but without testing it is just that, a guess. One of the best investments you can make to keep your tank healthy is something to keep an eye on the perimeters of the water.

Most of us including me recommend the API Master Freshwater Test kit. It will cost you about $25.00 but it will last for a very long time. With it you will know when you need to do a water change.
 
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CrisisQuaid

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maggie thecat said:
The filter will be "normal" as soon as soon as you plug it in and start water pumping through it. The bacteria will populate the new media as the bioload increases.

My concern is discus require pristine water, and I have a feeling, based on reading, not experience, that you are going to be pushing the limits of their tolerance because of the tank size.
That’s not my issue, I’ve done my research. I’m getting 4 discus a peacock eel, and 2 Pictus cats. Thanks for the help! I’ll be doing water changes like crazy for a few days to keep the water nice and clean.
 

maggie thecat

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That's good you're doing your homework .

As an aside, did you know pictus cats, like pretty much all catfish, are shoalers, who are most comfortable in a minimum group of 5 or 6?
 
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CrisisQuaid

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maggie thecat said:
That's good you're doing your homework .

As an aside, did you know pictus cats, like pretty much all catfish, are shoalers, who are most comfortable in a minimum group of 5 or 6?
Yeah, I’ve actually decided against the Pictus, do you know of any bottom feeders that can coexist with discus and peacock eels?
 

maggie thecat

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I think I would give the eel the run of the bottom, if it were my tank. Especially, given your other fish.
 
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CrisisQuaid

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maggie thecat said:
I think I would give the eel the run of the bottom, if it were my tank. Especially, given your other fish.
Sorry, I don’t understand that phrase haha, does that mean leave him the entire bottom to himself?
 
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