Using Aquarium Salt

beatkeeper

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OKay, I have read a bunch of conflicting stuff on aquarium salt. (By the way my parameters are all fine and tanks are cycled) Basically, after seeing how the pet store had their tanks set up when I 1st started keeping freshwater fish (almosta year ago) I poked some holes in the lids of these tiny ziploc tupperware containers that I had and filled them 3/4 full with aquarium salt (about 6-8 tbsp) and stuck them in the back corners of my tanks. I have to refill them about every month to month and a half or so. I have a bunch of live plants between my 4 tanks and a variety of fish (including a number of cories, which aqua salt is sopposedly bad for) but I have never seemingly had a problem with connected to the salt. None of my fish have suffered from disease either. However, after reading so many negative stuff about using aqua salt in freshwater tanks I'm wondering if I am slowly poisoning or hurting or making uncomfortable any of my fish. Has anyone used a similar method of aqua salt distribution? does it seem like that is too much to dissolve over that amount of time? I perform bi-weekly water changes on every tank, but do not add any extra salt--only once the salt container is completely empty. It is no trouble for me to do this, as I already had the containers, and the amount of aqua salt I go through does not cost me much at all. I would just rather do this as a preventative measure than deal with specific disease outbreaks. Just looking for some opinions...
 

izzyfishfarmer

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lanlesnee

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I've used salt to cure ich with my goldfish and have very seldom lost a fish due to this.
I started using salt when a my 125g goldfish tank caught ich and I used meds to try to cure it. I went by the book and slowly watch all my fish die over a period of a few weeks.
Now if I see a sign of ich I use salt (I use salt for my marine tank) and usually within a few days the ich is gone, but I continue the treatment for 10 to 14 days after.

I've cured ich 4 to 5 times with salt have have lost almost no fish this way. (I was getting sich fish from a LFS)

I don't use salt other wise. IMO the best way to prevent diease is to have healthy fish. I keep up on water changes and give them a good diet, including seaweed with galic.
 
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LyndaB

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definitely folllow the links you've been given..... there's really interesting opinions/experience offered up and it'll save us from having to rehash the salt theory.....
 

mathas

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I would just rather do this as a preventative measure than deal with specific disease outbreaks. Just looking for some opinions...
My opinion is that preventative medication is unnecessary, particularly in this case when the proven benefits of salt are so specific.

My real concern with your method, though, is that you haven't indicated any method of controlling the concentration. Salt at a specific concentration can be an effective therapeutic for certain external parasites or nitrite poising (though there are arguably better methods of handing each problem), but any above those minute levels is just adding potential problems. How much salt is in your water right now? Unless you use a hydrometer or refractometer to monitor closely, my guess is that you probably have more than you need or realize. Salt doesn't evaporate with the water, so each time you refill the container you're increasing the salinity of the tank.

Here are a few more links for you to read, that haven't been posted in this thread yet:





And on top of the potential fish issues, most plants don't thrive when salt is present. Here's a highschool lesson plan designed to show students what happens to a relatively-common aquarium/freshwater plant, when exposed to various concentrations of salt solution: http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.php?BenchmarkID=5&DocID=106
 

lanlesnee

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Hydrometer won't read the salt levels, since the levels should be very very low. A Reflectormeter should.

If I was going to read levels this low. I would want to use a test kits.
 
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beatkeeper

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Wow. Thanks for so many responses all. I'll definately give those links a read.
 
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