Urgent: My ropefish is in my filter

Discussion in 'More Freshwater Aquarium Topics' started by severage, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. severageValued MemberMember

    2nd time he swam up in it in the past 3 days. How can I safely get him out (as my mom did last time but she is gone right now), and is there any possible danger in this? thanks
     
  2. Eienna

    EiennaFishlore VIPMember

    What kind of filter is it?
     
  3. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Im not sure, Im not very knowledgeable about these things at all.
     




  4. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

  5. LyleBWell Known MemberMember

    Some folks pack the outflow of the filter with a filter media sponge. One of the whisper filter bags slit and fitted over the outflow and held in place with a rubberband will probably also work.
     




  6. Eienna

    EiennaFishlore VIPMember

    You should not have any real issue getting him out of a sponge filter. If you can remove the intake tube, do so, and he'll be easier to get to.
    If it's one of those filters that hang on the back, unplug it until you get him out and he should be fine assuming the impeller hasn't already hurt him.
     
  7. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Ok thanks guys, I just opened up the top, poured it over, and he slithered out. Will look into how to prevent this again.
     
  8. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    One last question, could this have possibly triggered an ammonia spike, when I poured him out of the filter into the fish tank?
     
  9. Eienna

    EiennaFishlore VIPMember

    No. However, you may need to rinse your filter media. Use old tank water and just swish it around a little (or give it a squeeze, if it's a sponge.) I would check your tank for anything decaying, and there's a possibility your tank was not fully cycled to begin with. Have you added any new fish lately?

    EDIT: I believe you have what's called a hang-on-back filter, often abbreviated HOB.
     
  10. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Yes, that would be it. Sorry for the mistake. No new fish added, hes the only one in there.
     
  11. Eienna

    EiennaFishlore VIPMember

    Huh. How long has he been in there?

    Maybe he's looking for a place to hide out. Dropping the water level slightly (I'm figuring he didn't enter through the intake tube) and providing him with a couple of caves may help keep him from going in there again.
     
  12. Jaysee

    JayseeFishlore LegendMember

    I warned you in the other thread - it was reeeeeally close to winding up on the floor. You'll need to secure the top of the filter, as well as the top of the tank. It's going to do everything it can to get out, especially because the tank is too small.
     
  13. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Will do.

    @Jaysee
    I know the tank is too small. However, he is still only around 6-7 inches long, meaning he has plenty of room space. We are going to upgrade the tank soon as he grows. I know ropefish generally are escape artists and like to get out of tanks by any means necessary, so I dont think my tank size is the problem.
     
  14. Jaysee

    JayseeFishlore LegendMember

    I know you know it's too small, but in my experience with escape artists, the smaller the tank the more they try to get out. That was the point I was trying to make.

    You could put some sort of netting over the top of the tank, under the hood. Cut a hole for the intake, but let the water pass through the net into the tank. That'll keep it in.
     
  15. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Ok. Thanks. Can you tell me though, will this tank suffice for his current size? its eating at me. The tank has foliage and everything that he likes in it. He is only around 7 inches long, so by the rough "one inch per gallon rule", he should be fine. The water is deeper than he is long. I just dont want him to be miserable. I don't plan on keeping him in there for much longer, but I just want him to be happy. I know that an adult ropefish can grow much longer, so I am of course going to move up in size.

    On a side note, he has eaten several bloodworms today, the first time I ever saw him (since he usually doesn't eat food that floats).
     
  16. Mrs.Price

    Mrs.PriceValued MemberMember

    This is why it is important to get him a bigger tank! As you've been told in other threads, the tank is too small, no matter which way you slice it, and the one inch per gallon rule DOES NOT apply to him. We have all told you this, sometimes the right answer isn't what you WANT to hear, but it's still the right answer. 10g is not big enough, not even right now, and the foliage only lessons the room he has in that tiny little space. Getting a tank "in the next year" as you have said, will not be sufficient. I'm not saying he's miserable, but he sure will be if kept in that tiny 10g.

    We've also told you that you need to get a new tank BEFORE he grows, you could stunt his growth and it could deform him or make him ill, or kill him for that matter! You need a new tank fairly soon, very soon, or you need to give him away to someone who has the means to care for him, that's part of being a responsible fish keeper, or give him to a friend wo has the means now, but can give him back later when you do have the means to care for him. We've been telling you the same thing over and over again, and that advice isn't going to change, no matter how many threads you make, or how many times you ask us if the tank is big enough and if he's happy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2012
  17. Jaysee

    JayseeFishlore LegendMember

    7 inches is pretty big - bigger than most of the fish that most people keep. A 10 really is way to small - to the point that it could be trying to get out to find something larger.
     
  18. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    Ok, thank you all. Apparently 7 inches still means he is a baby. I will get a new tank soon.
     
  19. Mrs.Price

    Mrs.PriceValued MemberMember

    Not a baby for long, and they grow faster than you think! However, you are lucky, ropefish grow slower than most... but his size keeps changing, first you said he was 8", then you said he was 6-7"... so I'm curious as to what his size actually is...
     
  20. OP
    OP
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    severageValued MemberMember

    I was estimating before. When I actually did a slightly rough measure, as he wasn't perfectly straight, I think he is about 6.5 inches long. Also, I am happy to say he is acting much more lively than after he had been in the filter. My parents said he would never eat bloodworms before (so we fed him some food that sank to the ground) but he has eaten 5 bloodworms today already.
     






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