Urgent Help Needed For Multiple Issue In Aquatic Plants

jimclassic
  • #1
Hello All,

I am seeing multiple signs of deficiency in plants like browning of leaves, leaves getting rotten, some of them getting transparent and with holes. I am putting some macro and micro elements along with Carbo supplements. However, still the condition is same. Please help me to get the reason for these issue so that I can fix these.

Thanks in Advance.

Note: Attached are two pics with the symptoms on it.

Jim
 

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Mcasella
  • #2
You have mostly root feeders is one of your issues, they need either some type of plant substrate or root tabs, you have in the first picture an ocelot/ozelot sword which has a variegated look with darker green or red "patches" all over the leaves, that one looks healthy. The second looks like a transitioning vallisneria, it is also a root feeder, if the crown (white part) of the plant is buried it will cause the plant stress.
The third looks to be a type of hygrophilia, but it has brown on all the leaves at the root of the leaves so I'm leaning towards coloration on that one. The next picture is bacopa with algae on it, remove the browned leaves (this one is a mostly column feeder so your nutrients you are dosing will help it).
The next pic looks like either a temple or hygrophilia type plant, but being in the cup like that is preventing it from getting access to the nutrients it needs so you will have to provide it root tabs to insure growth.
The next three are all swords, they are root feeders, however you have the crowns buried on all three of them and two of them still have their emersed growth leaves (meaning they will loose the rounded leaves and grow new long leaves, only rosette swords do not do this, but you do not have one of those). Raise the plants that have crowns up out of the substrate a little to ensure they crowns are not rotting under it.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #3
HI Mcasella

Welcome to Fishlore!

I think I can offer some insight, but first please answer what questions you can:

How long has the tank been set up
How long have the plants been in there
What specifically are you dosing?
How much each dose?
How often?
Do you do regular water changes? How much? How often?
Do you know any of the water parameters?
pH
dKH
dGH
NO3 ppm
PO4 ppm

Just answer what you can....it's not a test!!! -LOL

-Roy
 
Mcasella
  • #4
HI Mcasella

Welcome to Fishlore!

I think I can offer some insight, but first please answer what questions you can:

How long has the tank been set up
How long have the plants been in there
What specifically are you dosing?
How much each dose?
How often?
Do you do regular water changes? How much? How often?
Do you know any of the water parameters?
pH
dKH
dGH
NO3 ppm
PO4 ppm

Just answer what you can....it's not a test!!! -LOL

-Roy
Should have probably tagged OP, instead of me.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #5
Opps! Sorry Mcasella,

HI jimclassic

Welcome to Fishlore!

I think I can offer some insight, but first please answer what questions you can:

How long has the tank been set up
How long have the plants been in there
What specifically are you dosing?
How much each dose?
How often?
Do you do regular water changes? How much? How often?
Do you know any of the water ?


dGH
ppm
ppm

Just answer what you can....it's not a test!!! -LOL

-Roy
 
jimclassic
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
Opps! Sorry Mcasella,

HI jimclassic

Welcome to Fishlore!

I think I can offer some insight, but first please answer what questions you can:

How long has the tank been set up
How long have the plants been in there
What specifically are you dosing?
How much each dose?
How often?
Do you do regular water changes? How much? How often?
Do you know any of the water ?


dGH
ppm
ppm

Just answer what you can....it's not a test!!! -LOL

-Roy

This tank is a new setup of around a month old.
plants are here since 2 weeks. Ordered online and they were very fresh and green on arrival.
I am dosing Macro and micro elements along with phyto carb, all of them at 6ml on weekly basis.
Water change after 10 days.
I do not have any kit to test water parameters.

Thanks in Advance.
 
jimclassic
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
You have mostly root feeders is one of your issues, they need either some type of plant substrate or root tabs, you have in the first picture an ocelot/ozelot sword which has a variegated look with darker green or red "patches" all over the leaves, that one looks healthy. The second looks like a transitioning vallisneria, it is also a root feeder, if the crown (white part) of the plant is buried it will cause the plant stress.
The third looks to be a type of hygrophilia, but it has brown on all the leaves at the root of the leaves so I'm leaning towards coloration on that one. The next picture is bacopa with algae on it, remove the browned leaves (this one is a mostly column feeder so your nutrients you are dosing will help it).
The next pic looks like either a temple or hygrophilia type plant, but being in the cup like that is preventing it from getting access to the nutrients it needs so you will have to provide it root tabs to insure growth.
The next three are all swords, they are root feeders, however you have the crowns buried on all three of them and two of them still have their emersed growth leaves (meaning they will loose the rounded leaves and grow new long leaves, only rosette swords do not do this, but you do not have one of those). Raise the plants that have crowns up out of the substrate a little to ensure they crowns are not rotting under it.

Thanks a lot for your advise. The reason you are seeing some plants in cups are because I have kept them temporary to move later to substrate which I bought recently. With regards to root tab, are they still required even if I use macro and micro elements along with phytocarb supplements?
 
SeattleRoy
  • #8
I am dosing Macro and micro elements along with phyto carb, all of them at 6ml on weekly basis.
Thanks in Advance.

Hi@jimclassic

Specifically what macros nutrients and what micro nutrients?
 
jimclassic
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Hi@jimclassic

Specifically what macros nutrients and what micro nutrients?

Using these one as attached in pic.
 

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SeattleRoy
  • #10
Hi@jimclassic

That's one I am not familiar with, who makes it so I can find the ingredients?
 
jimclassic
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Hi@jimclassic

That's one I am not familiar with, who makes it so I can find the ingredients?

Its from an Indian Brand called "Aquatic Remedies". Attaching the screenshot of each for the ingredients.
 

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Mcasella
  • #12
Thanks a lot for your advise. The reason you are seeing some plants in cups are because I have kept them temporary to move later to substrate which I bought recently. With regards to root tab, are they still required even if I use macro and micro elements along with phytocarb supplements?
Rooted plants cannot take in column based nutrients very well if at all unless they are floating - root tabs insure they get nutrients directly without them trying to grow roots out of the substrate (if you have gotten a plant substrate root tabs aren't needed for a while, until the substrate is depleted), right now they are not getting the nutrients you are putting into the aquarium, the bacopa and hygros are the ones benefiting from it right now because they take column nutrients directly in.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #13
HI All,

The concept of root feeders and column feeders is pretty much erroneous. Plants are opportunistic and will absorb nutrients in any way they possibly can. For example, most plants in gardens benefit greatly from foliar feedings even though they have roots. Aquarium plants are much the same, a plant that grows a root it likely can absorb nutrients though that root but that does not preclude it also drawing nutrients from the water column.

Another example are stem plants, many of them inhabit the 'marginal zone' along the rivers, streams, and lakes in the wild. During high water season they are submerged drawing nutrients from the soil and the water, during low water season they may be totally emerged drawing moisture and nutrients from the soil or in a bog-like area. Granted, some plants especially those with a thick leaf cuticle layer such as anubias species may have difficulty drawing nutrients from the water column in which case they use their roots but most time anubias are not growing in the substrate or soil in our tanks but attached to hardscape so where do they get their nutrients.......the water column. Most plants are 'advantageous' grabbing the nutrients they require from the easiest and most abundant sources.

Don't get me wrong, root tabs definitely promote growth in swordplants, cryptocorynes, and some other species but that does not mean that roots are the only way for plants to accumulate nutrients.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #14
HI jimclassic

First the easy one, Photo #2 - Vallisneria and liquid carbon supplements which are made from glutaraldehyde do not do well together. Typically the val will melt completely or only send up stunted growth.

Photo #3 The 'brown' you are seeing is likely more a reddish color caused by the higher light intensity (PAR) as the leaves get closer and closer to the light source.

Picture #1, The 'brown patches' are likely diatoms, try to rub them off between your fingers. If they do rub off Otocinclus are a great fish for eating diatoms. The leaf tip that is 'hooked downward' is a symptom of a need for more calcium

Picture #4 It looks like diatoms, does it rub off easily between your fingers? If it is a dead leaf it could be due to low light or a need for more potassium. The roots in the photo look healthy.

Picture #5 Looks like a need for more magnesium based upon the interveinal chlorosis, the leaf on the right side either physical damage or possibly a fish took a couple bites

Picture #6 Are those newer or older leaves that are 'melting' if older leaves magnesium or potassium if newer leaves possibly iron

Picture #7 Are those newer or older leaves that are 'melting' if older leaves magnesium or potassium if newer leaves possibly iron

Picture #8 Looks like physical damage rather than a nutrient issue, I am not aware of a nutrient deficiency that causes 'cracking'

Hope this helps!
 
jimclassic
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
HI jimclassic

First the easy one, Photo #2 - Vallisneria and liquid carbon supplements which are made from glutaraldehyde do not do well together. Typically the val will melt completely or only send up stunted growth.

Photo #3 The 'brown' you are seeing is likely more a reddish color caused by the higher light intensity (PAR) as the leaves get closer and closer to the light source.

Picture #1, The 'brown patches' are likely diatoms, try to rub them off between your fingers. If they do rub off Otocinclus are a great fish for eating diatoms. The leaf tip that is 'hooked downward' is a symptom of a need for more calcium

Picture #4 It looks like diatoms, does it rub off easily between your fingers? If it is a dead leaf it could be due to low light or a need for more potassium. The roots in the photo look healthy.

Picture #5 Looks like a need for more magnesium based upon the interveinal chlorosis, the leaf on the right side either physical damage or possibly a fish took a couple bites

Picture #6 Are those newer or older leaves that are 'melting' if older leaves magnesium or potassium if newer leaves possibly iron

Picture #7 Are those newer or older leaves that are 'melting' if older leaves magnesium or potassium if newer leaves possibly iron

Picture #8 Looks like physical damage rather than a nutrient issue, I am not aware of a nutrient deficiency that causes 'cracking'

Hope this helps!

HI SeattleRoy - Thanks for detailed analysis and advise.
For Photo -3, I am a bit whether I have required light or it is more than required. Some people said that plants are getting in this condition due to improper light. And you have given the reason for higher PAR. So I am wondering shall I reduce the light or increase it.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #16
HI jimclassic

The only way to precisely answer that question is with a PAR meter. Sometimes it is possible to estimate the PAR level at the substrate given the tank dimensions, light fixture information (make and model), and with or without glass top. To be truthful I do not see any indication of having too much light in your tank.
 

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