Unpopular opinions? - Page 17

goldface

Member
NevermindIgnoreMe said:
I would eat an invasive species, even if it's a rodent. I wonder what lionfish tastes like, I had a teacher once who loved it. So I guess that's my unpopular opinion.
Never ate lionfish, but I've eaten many animals that swim and crawl in the ocean, so I have a pretty good idea what it'd taste like. It's definitely a white-meat fish, and likely comparable to sea robins. It probably wouldn't be bad at all.
V1K said:
There's not much to eat there. Guinea pig, on the other hand, if it really came to it... :rolleyes:
No, not Guinea pigs! Well, I'm willing to give it a try, too. It'd be just like eating a bunny, except not as cute.
 

JettsPapa

Member
V1K said:
As if I knew what Louisiana has to do with nutria . I ate mine as a potato kugel filling.
Nutria is a large non-native water-dwelling rodent that lives throughout much of Louisiana, eastern Texas, and probably other places. Some of the Louisiana natives are known as Cajuns*, and many of them don't shy away from non-traditional protein sources (and yes, the ones that fed it to me were Cajuns).

They were relatives of the guy who was my boss at the time, and I remember him telling me that when he was a boy they could get to the nearest town in 10 minutes by boat, but it took 40 minutes in a car.

*No offense is intended toward Cajuns in any way. I've known quite a few, and liked all of them.
 

Fae

Member
YellowGuppy said:
Crayfish are delicious.
So are shrimp.

...and many other things that live in water.
I actually stopped eating crayfish cause I accidentally brought some mamas with a bunch of babies on their bellies home and I felt so bad, I took them back but kept a couple babies. After watching my cute lil baby cray bumbling around his tank and growing up I don't know if I have the heart to eat them anymore. But they taste so good Q.Q
 

V1K

Member
I used to catch crayfish while my mom was fishing. I have no patience for fishing, but catching crayfish is more hands-on so I enjoyed it. Those were invasive spinycheek crayfish, less tasty than the local noble crayfish, but put some mayonaise and scallions on them and it's a treat . Then we moved to a different location where the waters didn't have any crayfish.
 

YellowGuppy

Member
V1K said:
I used to catch crayfish while my mom was fishing. I have no patience for fishing, but catching crayfish is more hands-on so I enjoyed it. Those were invasive spinycheek crayfish, less tasty than the local noble crayfish, but put some mayonaise and scallions on them and it's a treat . Then we moved to a different location where the waters didn't have any crayfish.
They're super invasive where I live—no native species located within 400+ kilometers, it's illegal to own any live ones, and as long as they end up dead there are no limits to how much you can catch. My kids love (eating) them!
 

JettsPapa

Member
Fae said:
I actually stopped eating crayfish cause I accidentally brought some mamas with a bunch of babies on their bellies home and I felt so bad, I took them back but kept a couple babies. After watching my cute lil baby cray bumbling around his tank and growing up I don't know if I have the heart to eat them anymore. But they taste so good Q.Q
I've never been a fan. I don't dislike them, I just don't think they're good enough to justify that much work for that little bit of meat.
 

NBettas83

Member
Losing a fish can be like losing a dog or cat. Fish matter to people and you shouldn't expect them to get over the death of a pet.
 

Rick bose

Member
goldface said:
Never ate lionfish, but I've eaten many animals that swim and crawl in the ocean, so I have a pretty good idea what it'd taste like. It's definitely a white-meat fish, and likely comparable to sea robins. It probably wouldn't be bad at all.

No, not Guinea pigs! Well, I'm willing to give it a try, too. It'd be just like eating a bunny, except not as cute.
Well, I personally find guinea pigs cuter than bunnies.

Also r u scarface?
 

goldface

Member

Lebeeze

Member
goldface said:
Yes, I am. Hi.
I was sad to see you die at the end of the movie man!
 

goldface

Member
Lebeeze said:
I was sad to see you die at the end of the movie man!
I'm just a cheap knockoff of the original. Another unpopular opinion . . .
 

kittenlover9876

Member
never recommend fish keeping to people with anxiety. I have cried so much and my anxiety has risen in the last month. BUT GOD DO I LOVE MY FISH BABIES
 

V1K

Member
kittenlover9876 said:
never recommend fish keeping to people with anxiety. I have cried so much and my anxiety has risen in the last month. BUT GOD DO I LOVE MY FISH BABIES
I wouldn't have thought about it, but it sort of makes sense. The first month of fish keeping I was very hyper, thinking about the tank and fish and plants all the time, getting ideas upon ideas, questions upon questions. I wasn't sleeping much, feeling tired 24/7, yet couldn't stop myself from researching something all the time. In my case all that emotional energy went into enthusiasm, but I could imagine that anxiety-prone person would channel some of it into anxiety, and the exhaustion wouldn't help either. Feeling intense enthusiasm is a bit like being drunk, so it makes sense that if you're emotionally stable you'll be all cheery and happy, but if you're not, all the bad stuff will surface. If I had to guess, you'll start feeling better when the novelty factor goes away, and that should happen quite soon, a person can only be excited for a limited time.
 

KribensisLover1

Member
Agree. Plus I realized that a lot will go wrong and the LESS I MESS WITH MY TANK THE BETTER. way more issues when I was constantly fretting and messing with the tank.
 

Lebeeze

Member
I have the opposite feeling about fishkeeping. I have big anxiety problems and watching the tanks and even doing the maintenance is very therapeutic for me.
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
BlueSable said:
I can't understand people who have tanks over like, 20 gallons full of fish that don't have names. I have a betta and mystery snails and I see them the same as I do my cats. So seeing people with rooms filled with fish that don't have names and call it a 'hobby' is kinda unsettling to me

I've never met somebody with the same view so I assume it's unpopular
It depends on the fish, some are like my dear sweet old hens that would sit and have a beer with me and watch the sunset, and some are like the jerk roosters who tried to spur my toddlers' eyes out. There's pets and livestock and while I wept for my poor old guppy that recently passed (and she had a name- but every fry?), I didn't break my heart over it like my betta. It depends.
 

Mii

Member
Pineapple pizza is delicious. Change my mind.
 

YellowGuppy

Member
Mii said:
Pineapple pizza is delicious. Change my mind.
People who judge others based on whether they like pineapple on their pizza still have some growing up to do. Change my mind.
 

YellowGuppy

Member
Albino variants of fish are less nice-looking than their coloured counterparts.
 

Ghelfaire

Member
YellowGuppy said:
Albino variants of fish are less nice-looking than their coloured counterparts.
I have a dark background so my albino cardinal tetras stand out a bit more than the regular ones. I also think albino oscars are pretty.
But yeah I have to agree that some albino fish aren't as nice looking.
 

Mii

Member
Ghelfaire said:
I have a dark background so my albino cardinal tetras stand out a bit more than the regular ones. I also think albino oscars are pretty.
But yeah I have to agree that some albino fish aren't as nice looking.
I LOVE the albino oscars! although the regular ones look nice too. Personally, I think lemon oscars are the prettiest of them all.
 

V1K

Member
Mii said:
I LOVE the albino oscars! although the regular ones look nice too. Personally, I think lemon oscars are the prettiest of them all.
Black and orange ones are the most beatiful to me, they look like demons from he ll with lava seeping through their skin, epic.
 

Ghelfaire

Member
V1K said:
Black and orange ones are the most beatiful to me, they look like demons from he ll with lava seeping through their skin, epic.
I used to call them lava fish when I was a kid! .an I would still love an oscar or flowerhorn but I just don't have the money for a bigger tank + the food that thing would need with this whole covid thing happening.
 

SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
I prefer the regular Oscars to the albinos, but besides that, most albino fish I prefer. I prefer Albino bristlenoses, rainbow sharks, etc.
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
Ghelfaire said:
I have a dark background so my albino cardinal tetras stand out a bit more than the regular ones. I also think albino oscars are pretty.
But yeah I have to agree that some albino fish aren't as nice looking.
It's that fleshy color of pale pork chop for me (not actually white fish) that reminds me of 'pink' irises, which are an abomination in a mess of blue and yellow ones, but with the brown and terra cotta ones in a scape of brick and warm earth tones, can shine. I keep trying to look at the albinos as a fish that just hasn't been shone to advantage yet but I have yet to mentally devise a plan where albino corys wouldn't assault my aesthetics so thoroughly I'd flinch every time I looked at the tank lol. It's a good thought exercise though

Oh! And here's my unpopular opinion du jour: [Most] fish long for the sky, and never seeing it deprives them of something essential to all of us creatires on earth, and I feel bad for any tank of mine's inhabitants without a view out the window and some natural light (I laugh at algae, with my team of nerites, bwa ha ha. I wish I had algae! maybe I'd actually see my amanos
Tsutey said:
I keep trying to look at the albinos as a fish that just hasn't been shone to advantage
*shown lol, darn ac
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
jkkgron2 said:
That peas aren’t very effective for some carnivorous fish. Daphnia is better and more effective.
Now you tell me after finally buying some wretched peas 'just to be safe' while my bettas and badises and tetras feast on daphnea like savages and never seem constipated in my life lol. (To be fair to myself I did hear this about the daphnea, but the incessant chanting about 'the pea' ensorcelled me, despite me thinking 'where in Thailand are they going to find a boiled pea? I am old enough to know most of my bad decisions are based on worrying, lol.)
My unpopular opinion du jour is just noticing during a desperate wait for Amazon to bring ich meds (I haven't had it in fifty years, I can be forgiven for putting off having it around, I think) that my UV sterilizer pump has absolutely knocked the ghastly ich explosion off my ember tetras in two days, despite prominent YTers claiming it does nothing.
I will probably still pull them out into a bare hospital tank and treat them (it's that or dig my amanos out of a planted hex- naw) when the meds come- but I might not- even the little one that was nearly eaten up by the dreadful spots is ich free. I may just keep the pump going and water change/mulm vac the dickens out of it and see how it goes. My thoughts are less is more on the chemical front, and stress is worst of all- and despite the infected tank, my embers are some of the fattest, happiest little fish I have ever seen- nutrition is as important as water quality (and they are tied, the live food is not nearly as fouling as even the most moderate frozen- the more low tech and intuitive I go the more it is gestalting. Garbage in, garbage out). So, try this thing for ich, I got it for cloudy water (it's a dream for that, while you're cycling, or post, while things are delicate).
IMG_20210209_110251463.jpg
 

V1K

Member
Tsutey said:
Now you tell me after finally buying some wretched peas 'just to be safe' while my bettas and badises and tetras feast on daphnea like savages and never seem constipated in my life lol.
I hope you like peas, because it seems you'll be the one eating them . My fish love frozen peas. I tried giving my hillstream loaches zuccini and cucumber because that's what people give to bottom feaders, but they weren't interested. The barbs ate the zuccini, whereas cucumber didn't interest even those forever hungry beasts. Now peas, that's something the whole family can enjoy. Barbs, hillstreams, shrimp, snails, me – only my cat has no appreciation for them.
 

NevermindIgnoreMe

Member
Tsutey said:
Now you tell me after finally buying some wretched peas 'just to be safe' while my bettas and badises and tetras feast on daphnea like savages and never seem constipated in my life lol. (To be fair to myself I did hear this about the daphnea, but the incessant chanting about 'the pea' ensorcelled me, despite me thinking 'where in Thailand are they going to find a boiled pea? I am old enough to know most of my bad decisions are based on worrying, lol.)
My unpopular opinion du jour is just noticing during a desperate wait for Amazon to bring ich meds (I haven't had it in fifty years, I can be forgiven for putting off having it around, I think) that my UV sterilizer pump has absolutely knocked the ghastly ich explosion off my ember tetras in two days, despite prominent YTers claiming it does nothing.
I will probably still pull them out into a bare hospital tank and treat them (it's that or dig my amanos out of a planted hex- naw) when the meds come- but I might not- even the little one that was nearly eaten up by the dreadful spots is ich free. I may just keep the pump going and water change/mulm vac the dickens out of it and see how it goes. My thoughts are less is more on the chemical front, and stress is worst of all- and despite the infected tank, my embers are some of the fattest, happiest little fish I have ever seen- nutrition is as important as water quality (and they are tied, the live food is not nearly as fouling as even the most moderate frozen- the more low tech and intuitive I go the more it is gestalting. Garbage in, garbage out). So, try this thing for ich, I got it for cloudy water (it's a dream for that, while you're cycling, or post, while things are delicate).
IMG_20210209_110251463.jpg
I have the same UV sterilizer!!
I don't want to be accused of getting off track by mods...
Treating with most commercial medications should not be done excepting serious and/or far progressed cases of disease, in favor of more carcinogen/chemical free options to avoid possible consequences to your fish's health.
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
NevermindIgnoreMe said:
I have the same UV sterilizer!!
I don't want to be accused of getting off track by mods...
Treating with most commercial medications should not be done excepting serious and/or far progressed cases of disease, in favor of more carcinogen/chemical free options to avoid possible consequences to your fish's health.
They look so good today, it's crazy, you'd never know a few days ago they were spotty little things. I was just grasping at straws (defying prominent youtubers is always nerve-wracking lol) but I am glad to see it. (Even my amanos were out this morning, I'm glad to see them!)
Oh and to keep things on topic, my unpopular opinion- these alien bettas like living paired (so far) just fine, despite all the cautionary tales, lol. We shall see how much I continue to hold this opinion
V1K said:
I hope you like peas, because it seems you'll be the one eating them . My fish love frozen peas. I tried giving my hillstream loaches zuccini and cucumber because that's what people give to bottom feaders, but they weren't interested. The barbs ate the zuccini, whereas cucumber didn't interest even those forever hungry beasts. Now peas, that's something the whole family can enjoy. Barbs, hillstreams, shrimp, snails, me – only my cat has no appreciation for them.
I like peas, it's all good lol
 

YellowGuppy

Member
NevermindIgnoreMe said:
Treating with most commercial medications should not be done excepting serious and/or far progressed cases of disease, in favor of more carcinogen/chemical free options to avoid possible consequences to your fish's health.
I'd love to see your list of sources as to which commercially available fish medications are scientifically proven to have a causative effect regarding an increased likelihood of developing cancer!
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
YellowGuppy said:
I'd love to see your list of sources as to which commercially available fish medications are scientifically proven to have a causative effect regarding an increased likelihood of developing cancer!
Off the top of my head recalling toxic pharma ingredients, formalin (ich meds, I believe, some brands?) is pretty darn carcinogenic, but I have a crystal shrimp tank to plant, if you want a run down ingredient by ingredient, that's a project you are welcome to tackle, lol- I am just grateful the minimal approach is working- I didn't particularly want to stress the tank out with salt or heat, either.
 

NevermindIgnoreMe

Member
Formalin and malachite green off the top of my head...
I can't remember brand names, api?? but some medications even have it stated on the box.
YellowGuppy said:
I'd love to see your list of sources as to which commercially available fish medications are scientifically proven to have a causative effect regarding an increased likelihood of developing cancer!
edit: If you just look up the active ingredients, you'll find plenty either proven to be carcinogenic or potentially carcinogenic.
 

JettsPapa

Member
NevermindIgnoreMe said:
Formalin and malachite green off the top of my head...
I can't remember brand names, api?? but some medications even have it stated on the box.

edit: If you just look up the active ingredients, you'll find plenty either proven to be carcinogenic or potentially carcinogenic.
A lot of products have labels saying that their ingredients have been found to cause cancer in California, so I always figured that since I'm in Texas I don't have to worry about it.
 

StarGirl

Member
JettsPapa said:
A lot of products have labels saying that their ingredients have been found to cause cancer in California, so I always figured that since I'm in Texas I don't have to worry about it.
Lol I was thinking the same thing!
 

Kribensis27

Member
Almost every fish product I use has apparently been found to be carcinogenic in California. Not sure why, even some fish foods say it!
 

RelaxingBettas

Member
JettsPapa said:
A lot of products have labels saying that their ingredients have been found to cause cancer in California, so I always figured that since I'm in Texas I don't have to worry about it.
After California sprayed me, my toddler, two little league teams, and my pool with malathion in 1989 (why I left), I'm not really interested in their opinion about toxicity, but they get bonus points for trying lol, even if it's too little too late. I read labels more (and listen less to the same media authority figures that told us 'more doctors smoke Camels' and told our grandmothers to **** with Lysol, speaking of carcinogens. ).
 

JettsPapa

Member
Tsutey said:
. . . I read labels more (and listen less to the same media authority figures that told us 'more doctors smoke Camels' and told our grandmothers to **** with Lysol, speaking of carcinogens. ).
They may have been right. I can still barely remember the doctor smoking a cigarette while he was examining me during an office visit.
 

N13

Member
My unpopular opinion is that gouramis CAN be kept with tiger barbs and they are hardier than they seem.
 

FishDuster

Member
Unpopular opinion: get rid of your stupid green lawn and think about what you would do if it were a fish tank
 

bcsay720

Member
I think that a happy, healthy betta with a ripped/previously ripped tail is just an overactive explorer and is living its best life.

Pictured below is my happy, healthy betta's tail who likes to disappear into the log and swim through the tight branches of my anubias all day every day.
 

ahouseofscales

Member
My unpopular opinion: Domestic Betta splendens should never be kept in sorority tanks, no matter how big or well planted your tank is. They are solitary and aggressive fish by nature. Yes, even the females. Keeping them in a sorority only benefits us and it's stressful and damaging for the fish. It's simply unethical. Exception: female siblings that have been raised in the same tank together and never separated.

EDIT: Another one that I just thought of, I love bettas and gouramis, but I really don't like honey gouramis. Every time I ask a stocking question they get recommended to me even if I say I don't like them :mad:
 

TheFISH12

Member
ahouseofscales said:
My unpopular opinion: Domestic Betta splendens should never be kept in sorority tanks, no matter how big or well planted your tank is. They are solitary and aggressive fish by nature. Yes, even the females. Keeping them in a sorority only benefits us and it's stressful and damaging for the fish. It's simply unethical. Exception: female siblings that have been raised in the same tank together and never separated.

EDIT: Another one that I just thought of, I love bettas and gouramis, but I really don't like honey gouramis. Every time I ask a stocking question they get recommended to me even if I say I don't like them :mad:
May I ask why you don't like them? Not saying it's bad to not like them, just curious.
 

N13

Member
ahouseofscales said:
My unpopular opinion: Domestic Betta splendens should never be kept in sorority tanks, no matter how big or well planted your tank is. They are solitary and aggressive fish by nature. Yes, even the females. Keeping them in a sorority only benefits us and it's stressful and damaging for the fish. It's simply unethical. Exception: female siblings that have been raised in the same tank together and never separated.

EDIT: Another one that I just thought of, I love bettas and gouramis, but I really don't like honey gouramis. Every time I ask a stocking question they get recommended to me even if I say I don't like them :mad:
You should get some honey gouramis
 

Leeman75

Member
ahouseofscales said:
EDIT: Another one that I just thought of, I love bettas and gouramis, but I really don't like honey gouramis. Every time I ask a stocking question they get recommended to me even if I say I don't like them :mad:
For a long time I wondered what in the world was the big deal about Honey Gouramis because just about everyone seems to eventually recommend them for stocking regardless of the tank size:

Need stocking for a 10 gallon planted tank - How about a pair of Honey Gourami?
I have a 29 gallon tank that I'd like a trio of centerpiece fish in, what should I get? - Honey Gourami would look nice.
I have a 120 gallon tank that I'd like suggestion for stocking? - How about 800 Honey Gourami?
What kind of Shrimp can I put in a 5 gallon tank? - Honey Gourami
What fish can I put in 55 gallon with Mbunas? - Honey Gourami
Is there a fish that won't be intimidated in a tank with a Midas in it? - Honey Gourami

Ok...maybe I'm exaggerating a little! But...they're recommended everywhere here. Why??

But then my daughter wanted a pair for her tank, so we got them. And we all fell in love. End of fish story. Honey Gourami are awesome!!
 

mimo91088

Member
I agree about the betta splendens sorority tanks. The species as we know it exist specifically because it was selectively bred for agression. There's really no getting around that long term.
 

Kribensis27

Member
While I agree that honeys are a bit overhyped, they truly are great little fish. They’re small, peaceful, hardy, and colorful, and can live in small groups with minimal aggression. They don’t need a very large tank, and they aren’t demanding when it comes to conditions.

I love them, and still plan to get a few for my 55g snail tank. They’re very popular and common, but for good reason. Many people who used to dislike them end up loving them after having them for a bit, as I did.
 

mimo91088

Member
Kribensis27 said:
While I agree that honeys are a bit overhyped, they truly are great little fish. They’re small, peaceful, hardy, and colorful, and can live in small groups with minimal aggression. They don’t need a very large tank, and they aren’t demanding when it comes to conditions.

I love them, and still plan to get a few for my 55g snail tank. They’re very popular and common, but for good reason. Many people who used to dislike them end up loving them after having them for a bit, as I did.
I've never kept honeys, aren't they supposed to be pretty easy to breed? I can see that aspect of them as part of the appeal.
 

Kribensis27

Member
mimo91088 said:
I've never kept honeys, aren't they supposed to be pretty easy to breed? I can see that aspect of them as part of the appeal.
I believe so. I think the relatively subdued aggression level compared to other gouramis can make it easier. The fry are supposedly super slow growing though.
 

ahouseofscales

Member
TheFISH12 said:
May I ask why you don't like them? Not saying it's bad to not like them, just curious.
It's really stressful for the fish. Domestic bettas are solitary and aggressive. Good pet owners put the needs of their animals first above all else in my opinion, and we aren't doing that when we force a solitary species together just because we like how it looks or its convenient for us.
Leeman75 said:
For a long time I wondered what in the world was the big deal about Honey Gouramis because just about everyone seems to eventually recommend them for stocking regardless of the tank size:

Need stocking for a 10 gallon planted tank - How about a pair of Honey Gourami?
I have a 29 gallon tank that I'd like a trio of centerpiece fish in, what should I get? - Honey Gourami would look nice.
I have a 120 gallon tank that I'd like suggestion for stocking? - How about 800 Honey Gourami?
What kind of Shrimp can I put in a 5 gallon tank? - Honey Gourami
What fish can I put in 55 gallon with Mbunas? - Honey Gourami
Is there a fish that won't be intimidated in a tank with a Midas in it? - Honey Gourami

Ok...maybe I'm exaggerating a little! But...they're recommended everywhere here. Why??

But then my daughter wanted a pair for her tank, so we got them. And we all fell in love. End of fish story. Honey Gourami are awesome!!
I'm sure they're great, I just honestly don't really like their coloration! I prefer dwarf gouramis or the wild coloration of thick-lips.
 

TheFISH12

Member
ahouseofscales said:
It's really stressful for the fish. Domestic bettas are solitary and aggressive. Good pet owners put the needs of their animals first above all else in my opinion, and we aren't doing that when we force a solitary species together just because we like how it looks or its convenient for us.

I'm sure they're great, I just honestly don't really like their coloration! I prefer dwarf gouramis or the wild coloration of thick-lips.
Lol I was asking why you didn't like Honey Gouramis but you answered it anyways so it's fine.
 

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