TWO Cs in 36g!!

danlor

Member
Oh No!! So I was stupid and listened to someone who said get a couple of bottom feeders, catfish or sharks, to clean up the gravel. Went to Pet store and they recommended what I think is a Columbian Shark, but I got TWO!! It just happened to be the only fish without a tag on their aquarium to read about. Took the advice of employee & I purchased them, get home and research (backwards, I know) now I'm reading they get big and ONE alone requires a 55g?? I have TWO! Plus 2 tiger barbs, 2 rosy barbs and a rubber lip pleco in a 36g:'(...will I kill them? Also having lots of hard water problems and high PH that I need help with...maybe I should post that on another thread though. Thanks for any advice.
 

xxSTEPHENSxx

Member
You should be able to take them back. If not it may be a good reason to get a bigger tank!!
 
  • Thread Starter

danlor

Member
That's what I was afraid of...just got them yesterday so yes, they'll take them back. But they're so darn fun to watch
Thanks
 

GemstonePony

Member
can you return them? or re-home them to another LFS?
I'd recommend a bristle-nose or rubber-lip pleco, or nerite snails are quite famous for their algae cleaning services. can you rest a large fishnet across the frame of the tank so the net is in the water? and put one of the sharks in that? just a suggestion for separating them.
 

clinton1621

Member
If you plan on getting a bigger tank later when they need it, keep them... if not, take them back and let them know about what they are recommending lol
 
  • Thread Starter

danlor

Member
A couple pics so maybe someone can identify in case I'm wrong..I know the quality isn't great, used my phone...Thanks.

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clinton1621

Member
Looks like it... heres a pic of one in this link

 
  • Thread Starter

danlor

Member
UGH! That's them...thanks so much
 

derek562

Member
danlor said:
Oh No!! So I was stupid and listened to someone who said get a couple of bottom feeders, catfish or sharks, to clean up the gravel. Went to Pet store and they recommended what I think is a Columbian Shark, but I got TWO!! It just happened to be the only fish without a tag on their aquarium to read about. Took the advice of employee & I purchased them, get home and research (backwards, I know) now I'm reading they get big and ONE alone requires a 55g?? I have TWO! Plus 2 tiger barbs, 2 rosy barbs and a rubber lip pleco in a 36g:'(...will I kill them? Also having lots of hard water problems and high PH that I need help with...maybe I should post that on another thread though. Thanks for any advice.
a 36 gallon tank will be fine for your columbian sharks, it is recommended that they have a larger area, but on average the columbian shark will grow to be approx 14 inches. that is going to take up 28 inches of your tank, and the other 10 inches for play. the sharks will get bigger according to the size of the environment you supply them with. your tank would be perfect for the two columbians, however. if you plan on getting any other fish. be sure to research them. especially suckers as they can grow very large, take up space that is essential for the columbians. the columbian sharks are usually a peaceful shark but the can be some what aggressive. making it a must to research what fish can live with them, especially the simple fact that the columbians live in a brackish water, some fish cannot tolerate that, but to solve that issue. get fish that can live in either or and just have a steady stream of salt in your tank, 1 tablespoon per 10 gallons. it will be very minimal salt. but this will not harm or effect the columbians in any way. on your hydrometer the salt in your tank will barely read on the first tick sice hydrometers can be inaccurate and difficult to use. try to keep the salt at that level at all times by testing once a day atleast. when you are adding salt into your tank it is important that you remove water from your tank, as the salt does not dissolve in the water, add more water, and add solution to eliminate the clhorine and other chemicals in water.
 

LyndaB

Member
I feel the need to clarify something.....

You were not stupid. You were misinformed. BIG difference.... HUGE even. We've all been in your shoes. The earliest part of this hobby is the most difficult. There's a lot to learn, seemingly all at once. But take a breath, sit back and research. And it all sinks in eventually.
 

GemstonePony

Member
a 36 gallon tank will be fine for your columbian sharks, it is recommended that they have a larger area, but on average the columbian shark will grow to be approx 14 inches. that is going to take up 28 inches of your tank, and the other 10 inches for play.
Sorry Derek, but this is false information, and a perfect example of the erroniousness of 1" of fish per gallon rule: the length of the fish should be no more than 1/3 the length, 1/2 the width, and 1x the height of the aquarium in which it's placed. The 1" per gallon is also not applicable for stocking fish that produce a lot of waste, such as plecos, goldfish, and mollies. It also does not apply to very territorial fish, fish with very light bio-loads, and messy eaters such as Oscars; thus, it is my opinion, and the opinion of quite a few other users, that the rule should be thrown out entirely as an inadequate guide for stocking.
the sharks will get bigger according to the size of the environment you supply them with. your tank would be perfect for the two columbians
Again, Derek, you have been very mis-informed. Small quarters stunts the growth of the occupants, resulting in a severly compromised immune system, and a premature death. Case-in-point: goldfish; they can live 20+ years and grow 6-8" in good conditions, but I have yet to hear of a 2-3" goldfish in a bowl (or even small aquarium) exceeding 10 years, and most bowl- or small aquarium-kept goldfish don't even live 5 years. While some of the deaths may be attributed to poor water conditions, some may not, and much research has been done that shows that fish emit a growth-stunting hormone that, in crowded conditions, accumulates enough to slow growth and shorten the fish's life-span.
I have also read many accounts of fish that should be enormous (mostly arowanas, pangasius catfish, and pacus) being severely injured and consequently getting very sick because they kept hitting the glass and were stressed from not being able to move very far because of how big they are compared to what they are in. In some cases the OP did not say what happened with the fish after being given advice, but in many cases the fish did not make it.
 

amberskye

Member
....severely injured and consequently getting very sick because they kept hitting the glass and were stressed from not being able to move very far because of how big they are compared to what they are in..

GemstonePony is correct.

I know very little about methods of calculating fish to tank ratio, but I DO know that fish who lack sufficient space to grow and are made to inhabit enviroments too small for their needs WILL butt the sides of the tank - accidentally if swimming around and purposely when stressed and desperate to get out! IMO keeping any animal in that kind of inappropriate living quarters is just cruel.
I feel the same about a lot of so-called-pets kept in unsuitable enviroments purely for the pleasure of humans . (I'm thinking snakes,lizards etc) It must be like a 6ft2" man trying to live in a tiny wardrobe.
IMO if 2 fish such as those you bought become permanent fixtures in your tank, there's bound to be accidents and injuries and lots of fish may get damaged in the fallout. Clinton makes a valid suggestion: If you plan on getting a bigger tank later when they need it, keep them... if not, take them back

Dont feel bad, we all get given bad advice, esp from LFS. And as Lynda said, the hardest bit of this hobby is the beginning! Ive felt like giving up a few times but its pretty standard to make a few humungous errors in the early days. I know I have...so..chin up. Do what's right for the fish.
 

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