10 Gallon Tank Twist Tie in Aquarium

JtheFishMan

Member
I just bought a power head, but it’s a little too big for my liking in the tank. I just something that will aeorate my water, and I was considering putting an air Stone in my saltwater tank, and tying it around my heater so it doesn’t just float everywhere. Does anyone know it a twist tie (the thing that you tie a loaf of bread with) release any toxins in a water if kept in there for prolong periods of time? I want some answers before I do it.

And does anyone have an alternate solution to tying something in aquarium that doesn’t release toxins?
 

fish 321

Member
It most lilkely will rust so I would not do it, mabey try a zip tie
 

Jesterrace

Member
JtheFishMan said:
I just bought a power head, but it’s a little too big for my liking in the tank. I just something that will aeorate my water, and I was considering putting an air Stone in my saltwater tank, and tying it around my heater so it doesn’t just float everywhere. Does anyone know it a twist tie (the thing that you tie a loaf of bread with) release any toxins in a water if kept in there for prolong periods of time? I want some answers before I do it.

And does anyone have an alternate solution to tying something in aquarium that doesn’t release toxins?
I wouldn't do an airstone. Will create salt creep and evaporation issues like crazy in a saltwater tank (even with a lid). I wouldn't do one of those twist ties as they have a metal center that will rust away in short fashion in a saltwater tank. What size powerhead is it and what size tank do you have?
 

Redviper

Member
If airation is the goal you should try a circulation pump. If you mount it just below the surface and angle it upward, towards the surface, it'll keep your water full of dissolved oxygen. There are fancier configurations that do other beneficial things as well.
 
  • Thread Starter

JtheFishMan

Member
This is the link to my Powerhead.
Marineland Maxi-Jet 400, Multi-Use Water Pump And Power Head, Fully Convertible, 110/500 GPH https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004IMPOI...abc_F6YW7W1KGE458DR1FXRH?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

My tank is a 10 gallon. The flow is good for the tank, it just seems to be bigger than I expected, and doesn’t really fit my liking. If I use an air Stone, I can just replace the water, but I do understand what you are saying.
 

Redviper

Member
The chemistry of healthy salt water helped run me away. The salt creep associated with airstones was the straw. Did you look around for an adjustable/smaller unit or does the entire flow pump idea turn you off? If so I understand that as well.
 
  • Thread Starter

JtheFishMan

Member
Redviper said:
The chemistry of healthy salt water helped run me away. The salt creep associated with airstones was the straw. Did you look around for an adjustable/smaller unit or does the entire flow pump idea turn you off? If so I understand that as well.
I have seen a smaller power-head on Amazon I think, so I am going to take a look at it. Can you further explain how the salt creep messed up your saltwater chemistry?
 

Redviper

Member
JtheFishMan said:
I have seen a smaller power-head on Amazon I think, so I am going to take a look at it. Can you further explain how the salt creep messed up your saltwater chemistry?
Saltwater is an ancient soup of mineral's that fish, and us, are dependent up. When sodium starts to accumulate out of your water, at the cracks of your sump or some other suitable point in your tank, those minerals disappear as well at differing rates. Your fish and invert's start to miss them in varying ways. This depends on the creature and what it's used to in terms of water quality, of course. The effects can be as simple as lack of appetite to loss of color to death, and everything else in between.

When I tried saltwater, I ending up buying anything I could afford to stabilize things. None of it worked, until I found a major issue. My wet/dry was situated in such a way that the back of it was out of sight in the cabinet. I had to clean it because the spray bar had stopped. I immediately noticed that there was a large crusty lump of salt on the back of the sump and bottom of the cabinet. I don't know for sure how this happened and got so bad, but I do know that I had wasted k's of $ and scores of animals. I did what I could to rehome what was still alive and gave up on salt forever.

Bear in mind, this was almost 30-years ago, so hopefully salt-tank tech is much better and easier to understand now. If you can, please post a pick. I'd really like to see your work and stock. If you want to see what I mean by "soup", take a look at the ingredients that come in a bag of top-quality aquarium salt.

BTW, I currently use a Jebao\Jebod SCP-180 wavemaker (the cheaper version of a Gyre). Even though I do fresh only now, it's improved my water in some very positive ways.
 

Jesterrace

Member
Redviper said:
Saltwater is an ancient soup of mineral's that fish, and us, are dependent up. When sodium starts to accumulate out of your water, at the cracks of your sump or some other suitable point in your tank, those minerals disappear as well at differing rates. Your fish and invert's start to miss them in varying ways. This depends on the creature and what it's used to in terms of water quality, of course. The effects can be as simple as lack of appetite to loss of color to death, and everything else in between.

When I tried saltwater, I ending up buying anything I could afford to stabilize things. None of it worked, until I found a major issue. My wet/dry was situated in such a way that the back of it was out of sight in the cabinet. I had to clean it because the spray bar had stopped. I immediately noticed that there was a large crusty lump of salt on the back of the sump and bottom of the cabinet. I don't know for sure how this happened and got so bad, but I do know that I had wasted k's of $ and scores of animals. I did what I could to rehome what was still alive and gave up on salt forever.

Bear in mind, this was almost 30-years ago, so hopefully salt-tank tech is much better and easier to understand now. If you can, please post a pick. I'd really like to see your work and stock. If you want to see what I mean by "soup", take a look at the ingredients that come in a bag of top-quality aquarium salt.

BTW, I currently use a Jebao\Jebod SCP-180 wavemaker (the cheaper version of a Gyre). Even though I do fresh only now, it's improved my water in some very positive ways.
Lots of changes have occurred on the salty side of the hobby. One of which is the idea that a Wet/Dry Sump is best left suited to Freshwater Tanks and a Conventional Wet Sump with Return pump, Protein Skimmer and possibly Filter Floss/Sock/PAD/Cup is the way to go. The more stuff you have in there to trap things the more problematic it is. The other is the realization that mixing tapwater with the high mineral content in salt crystals generally isn't the best for long term results or a clean looking display. RODI Systems have become much more available and affordable (The Aquatic Life RO Buddie runs a whopping $60). Auto Top Off Systems are now prevalent to keep your salinity levels balanced for you. If you have the funds you can even get an auto dosing system to make it even more hassle free. I actually started salty and I have had fewer problems maintaining my LPS Coral Reef than I have had keeping my freshwater tanks.
fish 321 said:
I have been looking for a powerhead small enought for my tank and the smallest I could find is this one https://www.amazon.com/hygger-Powerhead-Controller-Saltwater-Circulation/dp/B083LP42WZ
Go with this guy instead. A hair cheaper, less flow and still has the adjustable flow setting:

Amazon.com : Jebao SLW-10 Compact Wavemaker 1056gph, Black : Pet Supplies
JtheFishMan said:
This is the link to my Powerhead.
Marineland Maxi-Jet 400, Multi-Use Water Pump And Power Head, Fully Convertible, 110/500 GPH https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004IMPOI...abc_F6YW7W1KGE458DR1FXRH?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

My tank is a 10 gallon. The flow is good for the tank, it just seems to be bigger than I expected, and doesn’t really fit my liking. If I use an air Stone, I can just replace the water, but I do understand what you are saying.
Never been a fan of the Marineland Powerheads or basically any of the brands you find at Petco, Petsmart for anything but the Tank itself and possibly an HOB Filter. They just aren't well designed for Marine Applications. Definitely go with one of the ones from Amazon mentioned above.
 

Redviper

Member
Jesterrace said:
Lots of changes have occurred on the salty side of the hobby. One of which is the idea that a Wet/Dry Sump is best left suited to Freshwater Tanks and a Conventional Wet Sump with Return pump, Protein Skimmer and possibly Filter Floss/Sock/PAD/Cup is the way to go. The more stuff you have in there to trap things the more problematic it is. The other is the realization that mixing tapwater with the high mineral content in salt crystals generally isn't the best for long term results or a clean looking display. RODI Systems have become much more available and affordable (The Aquatic Life RO Buddie runs a whopping $60). Auto Top Off Systems are now prevalent to keep your salinity levels balanced for you. If you have the funds you can even get an auto dosing system to make it even more hassle free. I actually started salty and I have had fewer problems maintaining my LPS Coral Reef than I have had keeping my freshwater tanks.
Speaking only for myself, thanks for the needed SOTA update on the marine side. It's weird how many of the things you've mentioned I tried to meatball or dreamed about at the time. I'd like to hear more of your experiences, but this doesn't appear to be the place for that sort of discourse.
 

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