Turquoise Rainbow Fish With Crooked Spine

Cat Catherine

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I just got this guy today and when I got home I realized the bottom half of his body is crooked.

He swims just fine and is active and alert. Do you think he will make it or will he have a shortened life span?

1785ccd274659f70dd69a24104f65b4c.jpg
 

fissh

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It looks like a genetic deformity, he'll probably live a normal life (just don't breed him)
 

fissh

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rather it's genetic or tb, I'd take him back to the store that sold him to you.
 

DappleSunBurst77890

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I would personally not take him back to the fish store... What do you think the fish store would do to it?? I think you should eeuthanize the fish too. You can buy clove oil and calmly euthanize the fish. It is humane and the fish does not experience any pain. I would doubt a fish store would resell or humanly euthanize the fish... Good luck
 
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Cat Catherine

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Sorry guys, my app wasn't working so I couldn't respond.

So I should move him to quarantine and euthanize him? :/
 

sharambil

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No... give the fish a chance

I would move fish to quarantine and leave him there, feed him high quality foods and keep him there until he dies or gets better

Hes alert and fine
 
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Cat Catherine

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I looked up tuberculosis symptoms and pictures, and he doesn't have scale loss, lesions or loss of color. I'm conflicted about what to do.. maybe just quarantine and keep an eye on him.
 

NavigatorBlack

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The bent spine in a rainbow is a giveaway. More than most fish groups, rainbows have trouble with tb. The fish will encyst the Mycobacteria to contain it, and the cyst will cause the spine to change directions in its growth.
You are probably good til the cyst bursts. At that point, symptoms your source mentioned (plaque sores, etc) appear. The fish dies and the bacteria flood out looking for new hosts. They hit unaffected fish, and fish with their own internal cysts hard. That's how it spreads.
If he grows, and you want to keep him in quarantine, your quarantine must be disposable, and at least 20 gallons or his life will be horrible. He is an active, swimming fish.
Kept in with your other fish, he is a disease vector and a time bomb.
There are few things I hate more than euthanizing a fish, but. With tb, his life will be shortened, considerably. It may be painful. And it will kill your other fish.
I am a rainbow breeder, and while I have tb free strains, that has not come easily.

Wear gloves when you immerse your hands, if you have any cuts. It is rare for this to happen, but fish Mycobacter can transfer to humans. It did to me once - no fun and expensive - 6 months of antibiotics.
 
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Cat Catherine

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The bent spine in a rainbow is a giveaway. More than most fish groups, rainbows have trouble with tb. The fish will encyst the Mycobacteria to contain it, and the cyst will cause the spine to change directions in its growth.
You are probably good til the cyst bursts. At that point, symptoms your source mentioned (plaque sores, etc) appear. The fish dies and the bacteria flood out looking for new hosts. They hit unaffected fish, and fish with their own internal cysts hard. That's how it spreads.
If he grows, and you want to keep him in quarantine, your quarantine must be disposable, and at least 20 gallons or his life will be horrible. He is an active, swimming fish.
Kept in with your other fish, he is a disease vector and a time bomb.
There are few things I hate more than euthanizing a fish, but. With tb, his life will be shortened, considerably. It may be painful. And it will kill your other fish.
I am a rainbow breeder, and while I have tb free strains, that has not come easily.

Wear gloves when you immerse your hands, if you have any cuts. It is rare for this to happen, but fish Mycobacter can transfer to humans. It did to me once - no fun and expensive - 6 months of antibiotics.
Thank you for the information, I appreciate it.
 

Lionsrour

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The bent spine in a rainbow is a giveaway. More than most fish groups, rainbows have trouble with tb. The fish will encyst the Mycobacteria to contain it, and the cyst will cause the spine to change directions in its growth.
You are probably good til the cyst bursts. At that point, symptoms your source mentioned (plaque sores, etc) appear. The fish dies and the bacteria flood out looking for new hosts. They hit unaffected fish, and fish with their own internal cysts hard. That's how it spreads.
If he grows, and you want to keep him in quarantine, your quarantine must be disposable, and at least 20 gallons or his life will be horrible. He is an active, swimming fish.
Kept in with your other fish, he is a disease vector and a time bomb.
There are few things I hate more than euthanizing a fish, but. With tb, his life will be shortened, considerably. It may be painful. And it will kill your other fish.
I am a rainbow breeder, and while I have tb free strains, that has not come easily.

Wear gloves when you immerse your hands, if you have any cuts. It is rare for this to happen, but fish Mycobacter can transfer to humans. It did to me once - no fun and expensive - 6 months of antibiotics.
NavigatorBlack Perfectly put, as unfortunate as it is, I think you hit the nail on the head.
 
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