Treating Hydra- What Is The Best Option? Question 

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Crimson_687

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I looked into my shrimp tank and saw little octopus-spider like creatures hanging off my glass. There are a lot of them. They range in size. They’re not shrimplets, that I am sure of. They hang off the glass and sort of wave around. It’s horrifying
 

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86 ssinit

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Hydra!! And they will eat shrimplets and maybe even shrimp.
 

Repolie

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Looks like Hydra.
 

MissNoodle

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Definitely hydra and not a good creature to have around. Kinda fascinating, but not beneficial to your shrimp at all
 

yukondog

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Yep,Hydra.
 
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Crimson_687

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Yikes, I was hoping it wasn’t hydra. Heard about this stuff here and there when I was starting up my shrimp tank.

Can I use prazi pro or levamisole against them? I know both are shrimp and plant safe

i have levamisole powder from a camalanus outbreak on hand and after seeing hydra in my shrimp tank was wondering if levamisole would work on hydra. Anyone have experience treating hydra or using levamisole?
 
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Crimson_687

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Ok so after looking into it more, I decided I might go the heat route. As of now I haven’t had a new batch of shrimplets, and the batch I had previously are all now large enough for me to visibly see and catch safely.

However I’m worried about my plants. I’ve seen some hydra attached to my plants, so removing them is not an option. Will they survive 104F for 2 hours? Will the beneficial bacteria be ok?

Does aquarium salt work on them or is that just a myth?
 

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Pickup some fenbenzodol dog or cat dewormer, powder form is beat and dissolve approximately .5 mg of medication per gallon in warm dechlorinated water and slowly pour into the tank, wait 3 days and begin 25% water changes daily for a few days. Its harmless to your bacteria and your shrimp may even nibble on pieces that don't dissolve. That's also harmless.... it may cloud up your tank for a couple hours, also harmless. Kills hydra like a champ but I do recommend removing ornamental snails, probably all snails that you want to keep as some are sensitive to it.

I use panacur or safeguard dewormer.
 
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sfsamm said:
Pickup some fenbenzodol dog or cat dewormer, powder form is beat and dissolve approximately .5 mg of medication per gallon in warm dechlorinated water and slowly pour into the tank, wait 3 days and begin 25% water changes daily for a few days. Its harmless to your bacteria and your shrimp may even nibble on pieces that don't dissolve. That's also harmless.... it may cloud up your tank for a couple hours, also harmless. Kills hydra like a champ but I do recommend removing ornamental snails, probably all snails that you want to keep as some are sensitive to it.

I use panacur or safeguard dewormer.
The only snails in my tank are pond snails. Will them dying cause ammonia spikes? There’s no way I can remove all of them
 

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The dose mentioned wont kill pond snails, it would effect nerites and small mysteries but pond snails can survive it. Wont hurt the shrimp, I've even dosed with more sensitive creatures and had no casualties except hydra.
 

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Mcasella said:
The dose mentioned wont kill pond snails, it would effect nerites and small mysteries but pond snails can survive it. Wont hurt the shrimp, I've even dosed with more sensitive creatures and had no casualties except hydra.
I've never lost pond snails even with a significantly higher dose for other reasons but I've seen snails affected at higher doses so with any dose I always recommend removal for a period of several weeks. I don't always do so myself but have been in the hobby a few decades and base my decisions on experience and if I find a mistake easy to make I always recommend safer methods lol. Snails are usually fine in a small tank for extended periods so long as you feed them and keep up those tiny easy water changes and some filtration. They don't need much.
 

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After getting to a better cell connection and being able to view your photos. You may need to dose twice as occasionally the larger white ones and any green ones (which you don't appear to have) will survive the first round. When I dose a second time, I do a single normal volume water change and then dose the same amount again. You can use the same pouch of wormer if you keep it refrigerated and wrap it up airtight it'll be fine. Also occasionally I can find it in liquid form which works just as well as powder. Oil form works also its just a pain to grind up small enough to dissolve and often you end up with more small chunks that will lay around slowly dissolving in the tank for a day or so. Ant of it works just as well as the other.

Also to note on a couple occasions I actually had them come back a couple months later, both times I was leaving town and water changed prior to day three.

Fascinating fact, they are actually related to jellyfish.
 
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Crimson_687

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sfsamm said:
After getting to a better cell connection and being able to view your photos. You may need to dose twice as occasionally the larger white ones and any green ones (which you don't appear to have) will survive the first round. When I dose a second time, I do a single normal volume water change and then dose the same amount again. You can use the same pouch of wormer if you keep it refrigerated and wrap it up airtight it'll be fine. Also occasionally I can find it in liquid form which works just as well as powder. Oil form works also its just a pain to grind up small enough to dissolve and often you end up with more small chunks that will lay around slowly dissolving in the tank for a day or so. Ant of it works just as well as the other.

Also to note on a couple occasions I actually had them come back a couple months later, both times I was leaving town and water changed prior to day three.

Fascinating fact, they are actually related to jellyfish. 4]
Was able to find safeguard stuff at Walmart.

Should I dose twice two weeks apart?
 

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Crimson_687 said:
Was able to find safeguard stuff at Walmart.

Should I dose twice two weeks apart?
Dose once and after three days if you still see active hydra dose again. No need to wait two weeks for the second dose, .5 mg is a very low dose and I've dosed significantly more with zero ill effects other than certain snails.
 
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So before I treat the hydra, I’m going to collect a few so I can view them under a microscope at school. I tried pulling them off with tweezers, but they curled up and were not moving so I couldn’t view them properly. How can I collect them in a way that will keep them alive and fully intact?
 

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Razor blade or trim a plant leaf.
 

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Maybe a weird method... but I had these in my shrimp tank at some point and was pondering what to do about them.. and then they all vanished in a week. I put in two new amano's and the guy netting them accidentally included a guppy fry that I also released into that tank. Oscar the guppy made quick work of the hydra and they vanished... never saw them again (this was months ago).
So something you could try if you happen to have guppies in a different tank? I've heard gourami's will also eat them but don't think any but the honeys would be safe with your shrimp.
 

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Crimson_687 said:
So before I treat the hydra, I’m going to collect a few so I can view them under a microscope at school. I tried pulling them off with tweezers, but they curled up and were not moving so I couldn’t view them properly. How can I collect them in a way that will keep them alive and fully intact?
Find some on plant material and remove them attached to the plant in the water and try not to disturb them as much as possible. They come apart quite easily and actually propagate from pieces of themselves. I'm not super scientifically adept in them by any means but I can say they're pretty fragile little predators lol. You could also try siphoning them off of the glass into a jar or container. Either way unless its a relatively quick trip to class you may find that they've curled themselves up or passed away during the trip. Might be worth a couple bucks on an inexpensive thermometer, bubbler and some rotifers and 1 gallon aquarium to snip some off and try to propagate them for immediate removal at school for study?
 
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sfsamm said:
Find some on plant material and remove them attached to the plant in the water and try not to disturb them as much as possible. They come apart quite easily and actually propagate from pieces of themselves. I'm not super scientifically adept in them by any means but I can say they're pretty fragile little predators lol. You could also try siphoning them off of the glass into a jar or container. Either way unless its a relatively quick trip to class you may find that they've curled themselves up or passed away during the trip. Might be worth a couple bucks on an inexpensive thermometer, bubbler and some rotifers and 1 gallon aquarium to snip some off and try to propagate them for immediate removal at school for study?
I’ll probably just take them morning of then. It’s not really an experiment or anything, just for my own curiosity :)
 
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