Treating fin rot with aquarium salt 5 Gallon Tank

Hobbyist

I am planning to treat fin rot with 1 table spoon per 3g for ~mild (but not the beginning) stage of fin rot (I can take some pics if you want).
I only have aquarium salt for now, I am planning to change ~50% daily, then dose1.5 table spoon of salt at the beginning of the treatment, then dosing like 0.75 table spoon after every water change.
Do you have any advice for me to take into consideration before I start treatment?
 

devsi

I am planning to treat fin rot with 1 table spoon per 3g for ~mild (but not the beginning) stage of fin rot (I can take some pics if you want).
I only have aquarium salt for now, I am planning to change ~50% daily, then dose1.5 table spoon of salt at the beginning of the treatment, then dosing like 0.75 table spoon after every water change.
Do you have any advice for me to take into consideration before I start treatment?

What have you already tried, before resorting to medicating? Have you checked your water parameters etc?
 
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Hobbyist

What have you already tried, before resorting to medicating? Have you checked your water parameters etc?
I still didn't try any medication (I don't think I'd add anything other than salt unless the rot doesn't stop, or if I find some almond leaves ), I only performed a ~55-60% water change yesterday without adding anything into the tank. As for the parameters unfortunately I still don't own a test water kit until now, but hopefully I would have a chance to put my hands on one soon
 
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devsi

I still didn't try any medication (I don't think I'd add anything other than salt unless the rot doesn't stop, or if I find some almond leaves ), I only performed a ~55-60% water change yesterday without adding anything into the tank. As for the parameters unfortunately I still don't own a test water kit until now, but hopefully I would have a chance to put my hands on one soon

Honestly, the first thing you should do is test your water otherwise you could be adding salt to no benefit or worse his detriment.

Also, I’d stop doing such big water changes until you can test your tap water as you could be making the problem worse.

For example, if your cycle has stalled and your tap water Ammonia is higher than your tank, you could be causing more damage.
 
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Hobbyist

Honestly, the first thing you should do is test your water otherwise you could be adding salt to no benefit or worse his detriment.

Also, I’d stop doing such big water changes until you can test your tap water as you could be making the problem worse.

For example, if your cycle has stalled and your tap water Ammonia is higher than your tank, you could be causing more damage.
Although I don't know the state of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the tank (that's why I should buy an aquarium kit soon) I don't think that the tank is uncycled because it's been running since last April, but don't get me wrong; I agree that playing around with the water of the tank without a test kit is a risk, but I unless I buy a test kit today or tomorrow (which isn't likely to happen) I guess I have no other option except starting treatment early.
I hope you get me
 
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devsi

Although I don't know the state of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the tank (that's why I should buy an aquarium kit soon) I don't think that the tank is uncycled because it's been running since last April, but don't get me wrong; I agree that playing around with the water of the tank without a test kit is a risk, but I unless I buy a test kit today or tomorrow (which isn't likely to happen) I guess I have no other option except starting treatment early.
I hope you get me

I totally understand what you're saying, but understanding your water parameters is absolutely the most important thing.

It's entirely up to you, and maybe others will chime in with their expertise (I'm no expert, just a fellow hobbyist), but prematurely medicating seems like a bad idea when you don't actually know the underlying reason for the fin rot.
 
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Hobbyist

I totally understand what you're saying, but understanding your water parameters is absolutely the most important thing.

It's entirely up to you, and maybe others will chime in with their expertise (I'm no expert, just a fellow hobbyist), but prematurely medicating seems like a bad idea when you don't actually know the underlying reason for the fin rot.
Sure, understanding water parameter is a must in any tank, I also think that the reason for the fin rot is bad water quality. So yeah, I'll see what should I do and thanks for your time :)
 
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devsi

I also think that the reason for the fin rot is bad water quality.

Then definitely don't medicate, IMO. If you are unable to get a test kit, maybe consider re-homing him?

So yeah, I'll see what should I do and thanks for your time

You're welcome!
 
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Hobbyist

Then definitely don't medicate, IMO. If you are unable to get a test kit, maybe consider re-homing him?
Just to clear; I didn't mean bad water quality in general, it was my fault for the past two months to change the water later than I should, otherwise I don't think the fish would thrive more than three months
 
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FoldedCheese

If that's the case then his fin rot should easily heal with increased WCs of 50% 3x per week. Clean water is the best medicine and it is the first thing I recommend folks try before medicating. Imo salt should only be used if the infection is moderate to severe.
 
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devsi

If that's the case then his fin rot should easily heal with increased WCs of 50% 3x per week. Clean water is the best medicine and it is the first thing I recommend folks try before medicating. Imo salt should only be used if the infection is moderate to severe.

Unless his water has a high Ammonia reading....
 
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RayClem

Remember that what is often called fin rot may be either a fungal or bacterial disease.

Sometimes I have cured fin rot by amputating the infected portion of the fin and then allowing the fin to regenerate naturally. This can be done with a pair of sharp scissors.

One of the best ways to treat fin rot is to apply an antiseptic to the infected fin. Back in the old days when real mercurochrome was available, we would use that.. Since it contained mercury, it is no longer sold. There are some "mercury free" mercurochrome products sold that contain benzalkonium chloride, but I do not know how well they might work.

Today, I would probably apply tea tree essential oil (melaleuca) directly to the fin. However, if you have a betta or other labyrinth fish, be aware that they are sensitive to melaleuca. API sells a solution of malaleuca oil in their Melafix product. They also sell Bettafix that is a low concentration version of Melafix. If you apply it directly to the fin, you should be OK.

If you think this is a fungal infection rather than bacterial, API also sells Pimafix. This is a solution of West Indian bay tree essential oil (pimenta racemosa). You could apply it directly to the infected fin as well.
 
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LightBrownPillow

FYI, most local fish stores will test your water for you if you can bring in a sample. One way to get by until you can afford a test kit, and a great chance to ask for advice from the store staff with data right in front of you
 
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