Total Newbie Here. My Betta Has Two Weird Spots On Him. What Could This Be?

Macrophage

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He has two spots on his right side, near his eye, that were never there before. See the images. For reference, I have included a shot of his left side where there are no spots.

Embedding didn't seem to work, so here are the image links

betta01
betta02
betta04
 

jdhef

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Welcome to FishLore!

When I click the link, I get to the page, but there is a small box with an "x" thru it instead of the photo
 

e_watson09

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The photos show up for me but are hard to see, it almost looks like early stages of ich to me. Is there anything else in the tank? What size tank and what are your parameters? If it really is ich there are ways you can treat without medication.
 
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Macrophage

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The photos show up for me but are hard to see, it almost looks like early stages of ich to me. Is there anything else in the tank? What size tank and what are your parameters? If it really is ich there are ways you can treat without medication.
45 gallon tall tank which also contains:
5 amano shrimp
4 albino cories
2 agassazi cories
2 amazon swords
2 large pieces of java moss

pH = 7.1
Ammonia = 0 ppm
Nitrite = 0 ppm
Nitrate = 10 ppm
GH = 4
KH = 5
Temperature is kept at a steady 78 F
Tank is filtered by an AquaClear 70
No additional aeration
 

GuppyDazzle

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It looks like ich. Once the white spots appear the parasite has been there for a while. Ich infects the entire tank. It won't do any good to remove the fish showing symptoms. You'll probably see a rapid increase in the number of white spots over the next couple days.

The parasite itself is not visible. The white spots are the body's reaction to the parasite attaching itself to the fish. The white spots are the only visible phase of the life cycle. That's what makes it tricky to treat. The only phase where you can kill it is when you can't see it. Ich will also infect the gills, where you can't see the white spots. When you treat it, treat for the duration. It's common for people to stop treating when the white spots disappear, and the ich always comes back with a vengeance.

There are three common ways to treat ich, and all are effective, temperature, salt, and medication. Which method is best depends on your situation. For example, if you have a planted tank salt is not a good option. Some fish are sensitive to higher heat. Once you decide on a method, stick to it and don't combine methods. Some people throw all three methods at it, but that triple stresses your fish with no benefit in terms of treatment.
 

e_watson09

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My guess is ich and if that really is what it is then you'll want to treat the whole tank. Depending on the type of fish you have and if they can handle it I recommend the heat method. I find it to be the cheapest and most effective method but not all fish can handle the heat.
 

GuppyDazzle

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I don't see any spots on my other fish. However, I'm sure they would be difficult to see on my albinos.
Again, the visible spots are just one phase of the life cycle. The majority of the life cycle is not visible, so you won't necessarily see any white spots on any fish. When white spots appear, it means ich has been present in your tank and attaching to your fish for some time. To treat effectively do not associate visible white spots with presence of the disease.
 
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Macrophage

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New update today. Some time in the last hour, the two large white spots visible in the photograph have disappeared. (Two much smaller white spots, on his body near the base of the fins in different areas, are still there.)

Is this what happens with ich when the parasite enters the next stage of the lifecycle?

Or does this mean it was something else entirely?
 

James105

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Hey,

Ich or ick is a parasitic disease that causes white dots or spots on the skin of betta fish. It can be prevented by changing the water regularly and ensuring proper filtration/chemical balance.

Check the link below to see if your Betta has any of these issues:
How to Tell if a Betta Fish Is Sick

I can't say much about the fact the white spots are not visible now, but if I were you, I would be doing regular water changes and I would go down to the fish shop asap and get Ich medicine to add to your tank.
 

GuppyDazzle

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New update today. Some time in the last hour, the two large white spots visible in the photograph have disappeared. (Two much smaller white spots, on his body near the base of the fins in different areas, are still there.)

Is this what happens with ich when the parasite enters the next stage of the lifecycle?

Or does this mean it was something else entirely?
White spots appearing then disappearing is a normal progression of the parasite's life cycle. When a microscopic ich parasite attaches to the fish, the white spots are the fish's body's reaction to the parasite. When the white spot disappears, it has fallen to the bottom as a cyst. After a few days the cyst blows open and releases zillions of little nasties into your water column, which reattach to your fish, completing the cycle. That's why people who stop treatment once the white spots disappear will see the disease come back with a vengeance.
 
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