Torpedo Barb - Lasted 35 minutes

turnonthebrightlights

Active Member
HI all.

I was wondering if someone can help me out with the following...

I bought a Torpedo Barb (Rose Line Shark... whatever you choose to call them) on Saturday. I took him home, carried out all the necessary acclimatisation procedures, and finally released him into the tank. 35 minutes later, I was flushing him after I noticed the lifeless body was floating. I was devestated. Not because he cost me £15, but because not only was he gorgeous, but I thought (and it could well be) something I had done which killed him.

I carried out a water test straight away, and had NO ammonia or nitrite, and10 Nitrate. The only thing I would say, is the PH was at 8. I know that may be slightly too high, but I was told these were very hardy fish, so that shouldn't have made that much of a devestating impact that quickly (I have 2 Bolivian Rams in the tank, who seem to be loving it in there, and I would have thought they would prefer slightly lower PH also)

Basically, I was wondering if (a) this was a freak occurrence, and was sold a dodgy fish, or if not (b) is it safe to add a PH buffer, knowing that the fish already in the tank are stable with the current water levels? Granted, most of the fish are either Platies or Mollies, which are both pretty bulletproof.... But I don't want to lower the PH if it will affect the others

Thanks

Greg
 

djsmiley2k

Active Member
Where did you get him? I'd take him back :S
 

RogueAgent94

Fishlore VIP
Hi!

I'm sorry about your fish I love those. My uncle keeps Torpedo barbs and he also lives in england. Do you know about drip acclamation? That helps a lot with evening the pH. A lot of fish die because of pH changes. If you don't, I will gladly explain it.
 

turnonthebrightlights

Active Member
Got him in a shop in Enfield. I bought plants from there before which turned out to be snail infested... the second time I went there I got the Torpedo Barb, and it died VERY quickly. I won't be going back there.

Rougeagent... Not 100% sure what you mean. If you mean slowly add water to the bag before adding the fish to the tank, then that's whayt I always do. If you mean something else, please tell me as I will try it again when I buy another next month.

Do you recommend any PH up/down products, or will that just upset the tank do you think?
 

Jaysee

Fishlore Legend
Definitely sounds like shock from the water - that's the only thing that can kill a fish so quickly. Ammonia and nitrite poisoning take much longer to kill.
 

RogueAgent94

Fishlore VIP
No. I think its best if you don't mess with the pH with chemicals. Domestically bred fish now can acclimate to almost any pH in aquariums these days. This is the drip acclamation process that I use. It will make the pH in the bag the same as in your tank.

This is the drip method

Basically what you do is float the bag of fish in your tank for 15-20 minutes. That is to get the temperature the same. Then take a thin hose or pipe. Make a suction by putting one end of the pipe inside the tank and the other end below the end in the tank. If that doesn't create a suction, gently suck on the end outside of the tank until water comes over the loop in the pipe (try not to get water in your mouth its NASTY, I've done it before). That should create a suction. Then tie two or three knots in the pipe, not too tight. This will slow down the flow of the water. Tighten the knots until there is two or three drops a second coming out of the pipe. Then take the bag out of the tank and open it. Put the bag inside a bucket with the top open. Place the pip inside the bag. Empty out half of the water in the bag when the bucket gets half full or so. I usually do this for about an hour or two. This slowly makes the pH in the bag the same as the pH in the tank.
 

turnonthebrightlights

Active Member
Thanks for that Rougeagent, that's great.

I think I'll wait a month and go to my normal LFS to get one next time. They sell larger ones, so they may (hopefully) be a bit hardier. I'll use the method you posted and hopefully the little fella will be fine!

To be honest, I didn't fancy using any more chemicals in the tank... especially if all my other fish seem to be fine. I use Seachem's Alpha, which is amazing, and I have some Nutrifin Plant Gro which I am about to use for the first time (bit nervous about using it, but I'm sure the fish will be fine!). Those are the only things I want to add to my water!
 

RogueAgent94

Fishlore VIP
I have never heard of Seachem's Alpha but I have used Nutrifin Plant Gro before. It's great. I try to stay away from chemicals as much as possible.


Also torpedo barbs like to be in schools so when/if you pick them up I suggest getting at least 4. You might want to ask your LFS if they are domestically bred or wild caught. Wild caught fish (IMO) are not as hardy because they have never had to go through such sudden changes as domestically bred fish.
 

turnonthebrightlights

Active Member
Alpha I'm seriously amazing. I always used Prime beforehand. It's primarily for saltwater, but can also be used in freshwater. I highly recomment it. Don't have to use much either.

Thanks for that. I'll ask them. I know they get a lot of the'r stock from Europe, but not sure about these. I'm pretty sure they aren't wild caught though.

will 4 not be too big for the tank when fully grown though? if so, I may leave it and get maybe an albino Ruby shark....
 

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