Too much Thrive and Algae

Nikao

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I have been dosing both my 20Ls with two squirts of Thrive every week, but I think it has been feeding algae along with the plants. I have green algae, some tan fuzzy algae, and green hair algae. It is growing. I’m pretty sure it is because of excess nutrients in the water. I plan on cutting back on the thrive and letting the plants take over without it.
What do you guys think?
Thanks.

Nick
 

StarGirl

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How long are your lights on? Plants need the ferts to out compete the algae. How often do you change the water?
 
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Nikao

Nikao

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I think what is happening is I’m over feeding. I’ve been seeing some algae. I have planted tanks and there really isn’t an algae bloom. The tanks are stable. I just see all these crystal clear tanks and wonder if my bits of hair algae and green algae on the glass are abnormal.

The iron could be from iron photoreduction with the light. I have the tanks scheduled from 6am to 8pm with light.

I see how ferts are needed; I read a lot about it this weekend. The problem could also be caused by too much carbon in the water as algae not only get their carbon from photosynthesis, but can absorb it from bicarbonate in the water. So, hardwater can be a no no. The plants have a hard time competing with algae this way.

Sorry, I’m answering my own question. Food breaks down into iron which the algae thrive on.
 

YellowGuppy

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Regular Thrive? The bottle suggests a single pump per 10 gallons, doesn't it? 20L ≈5 gallons, so at two pumps, you might be quadruple dosing.
 
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Nikao

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YellowGuppy

I just use 2 squirts in my 20Ls each. Oh...20G Longs

I just don’t know how I would feed my fish in the morning before I go off to work at 7am and then feed them when I get back at 4:30pm

I would like to be able to enjoy my fish.

Anyways, would the ideal be 12 hours to mimic tropical climates?

Thanks.
 

YellowGuppy

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Nikao said:
YellowGuppy
I just use 2 squirts in my 20Ls each. Oh...20G Longs
Ah, that's different! 20 gallon long » 20 litres!
Nikao said:
YellowGuppy
I would like to be able to enjoy my fish.

Anyways, would the ideal be 12 hours to mimic tropical climates?
Oddly enough, lights in a tank are much more for our enjoyment (or the health of the plants) than they are for the fish. If you'd like morning and evening light, you could certainly do a split photoperiod (e.g. 6AM to 9AM, then lights out until a 4-8PM window. That way you're still seeing them in the same window of time, but reduced lighting can combat algae.

A 12 hour window of lighting would indeed mimic a natural tropical setting, assuming that our lights perfectly mimic natural tropical sunlight, which in many ways they don't. Also, most natural habitats have other means of controlling algae (e.g. cloud cover, constant flow of water from source to ocean, partial plant cover from riverbanks, depths of >18" that we might have in our tanks, etc) that we can't easily account for. A reduced (and/or split) photoperiod might be a good first exploratory step in fighting algae.
 
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Nikao

Nikao

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YellowGuppy said:
Ah, that's different! 20 gallon long » 20 litres!

Oddly enough, lights in a tank are much more for our enjoyment (or the health of the plants) than they are for the fish. If you'd like morning and evening light, you could certainly do a split photoperiod (e.g. 6AM to 9AM, then lights out until a 4-8PM window. That way you're still seeing them in the same window of time, but reduced lighting can combat algae.

A 12 hour window of lighting would indeed mimic a natural tropical setting, assuming that our lights perfectly mimic natural tropical sunlight, which in many ways they don't. Also, most natural habitats have other means of controlling algae (e.g. cloud cover, constant flow of water from source to ocean, partial plant cover from riverbanks, depths of >18" that we might have in our tanks, etc) that we can't easily account for. A reduced (and/or split) photoperiod might be a good first exploratory step in fighting algae.
Oh my gosh!!
I never thought of that!! Thanks so much!!
 

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