Too much tanis?

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Reema

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I have a 10 gl well planted established tank, in which I dump a few almonds leaves every now and then. Parameters always good. Inhabitants: 1 betta, 1 mistery snail and few cherry shrimp. Everything was ok, until I decided to deepen the tint of the water. I had a bunch of catapa mini leaves, so I boiled them until they released a dark amber tint. Left the pot to cool down until the morning, drained and treated the water with a few drops of Prime and poured it in my tank. Quantity of tinted water added...about 3 cups.
To my horror, betta and snail died by the end of the day. I'm totally dumbfounded and horrified. What happened, what did I do ? Help.
Shrimp are ok so far, in fact they seem to have come out of hiding more and are more active then in previous days.
 

Salem

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The tannins wouldn't have anything to do with this- check your parameters. For now you'll want to do a water change to deal with any ammonia released before you could remove the betta and snail.
 

LittleBlueGuppy

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More likely that the decaying leaves may have released ammonia. Another possibility is the ph or temperature shock did something. But more importantly, what are your water perimeters? That might tell you what went wrong.
 

StarGirl15

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I just read another thread where tannins fluctuate Ph. Im guessing that would be the culprit to me. A piece of wood leeches over time but you dumped 3c in all at once. Ph staying steady is just as important as having no ammonia.
 

MissPanda

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I think it was a Ph drop that was too drastic. I'm not sure which tea, but I know people use that to darken the water instead of almond leaves because it affects ph.
 
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Reema

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Salem said:
The tannins wouldn't have anything to do with this- check your parameters. For now you'll want to do a water change to deal with any ammonia released before you could remove the betta and snail.
I checked the parameters a few days before and they were fine, also the fish and the snail were active, eating. Today after adding the tinted water it went south for them in a matter of hours.

StarGirl15 said:
I just read another thread where tannins fluctuate Ph. Im guessing that would be the culprit to me. A piece of wood leeches over time but you dumped 3c in all at once. Ph staying steady is just as important as having no ammonia.
I think you're right. Eliminating every other possibility, and given that the fish was perfectly fine a day before, the only culprit appears to be ph drastic change. What a mess. I murdered my fish. :(

LittleBlueGuppy said:
More likely that the decaying leaves may have released ammonia. Another possibility is the ph or temperature shock did something. But more importantly, what are your water perimeters? That might tell you what went wrong.
Well, I'm gonna take a long break before I get another fish, betta or otherwise. I need time to recover from this stupid mistake, plus I have another problem now...testing for ammonia with the water being so dark its pointless. The tint distorts the result.
 

LittleBlueGuppy

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Reema said:
I think you're right. Eliminating every other possibility, and given that the fish was perfectly fine a day before, the only culprit appears to be ph drastic change. What a mess. I murdered my fish. :(
You didn’t murder him. Murder is intentional. I know it hurts, but we all make mistakes sometimes. We have a choice wether we will give up and be miserable, or push through them and learn from them. My condolences. Sorry for your loss. Just don’t lose hope or give up.
 

Klaudia

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I have read that if you add too much almond leaves it could be deadly to shrimp. Maybe it’s the same for fish especially since you said everything else was fine.
 

Nobote

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Put some carbin in the aquarium...itll clear up your tint and tannins pretty quick.
 

DoubleDutch

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Reema said:
I think you're right. Eliminating every other possibility, and given that the fish was perfectly fine a day before, the only culprit appears to be ph drastic change. What a mess. I murdered my fish. :(
3 cups of water added in 10 Gallon hardly can cause a "drastic" drop. It is not acid what you've been adding..

You didn't murder your fish !!!!

Personally I wouldn't do it like this but simply add some leafs to the tank so those will gradually release tannins etc....
 

MacZ

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Well actually... leaf extract can have a pH as low as 3. But usually if you make extract yourself you don't use the first extract but only cook the botanicals for maybe 15minutes to get out pathogens and then put new water in the pot and cook it for hours to reduce and concentrate it. As three cups on a 10 gallon are really not much, I suppose the leaves were somehow contaminated. Question is, with what, as the shrimp seem to be well.
 
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