Too much algae?

Frankthetank1210

Member
Is this too much algae on the heater and stuff? There is a bit on some rocks too but algae eaters seem to love it and water parameters are fine

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alink

Member
What kind of algae eaters do you have?

How long did it take to get like this?

Is the tank near a window or does it get any direct sunlight? If so how many hours (approx)?

How many hours a day is the light on the tank?

Finally, do you have live plants in the tank other the one pictured?
 

TexasDomer

Member
I don't think that's too much, but answering alink's questions will can help us determine if the algae will become more of a problem in the future.
 

Adam55

Member
I'm sure the algae eaters do love it, but keep in mind that algae eaters gorging themselves just feeds the cycle. They'll produce more waste and possibly more algae. I'd try and determine the source of the algae; but no, I don't think it's necessarily too much. On its own, algae is usually harmless. It's what leads to the algae that can be the issue, in my opinion.
 
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Frankthetank1210

Member
Although not algae eaters per se, a dojo loach, rainbow shark, Pictus catfish( whom I do not often see eating the algae)

They have been that way for quite awhile so this isn't something I just started noticing all of a sudden

It is not near window

Light may be I around 8 hours per day( starting to keep closer track now)

Just one, it's a tall bamboo stalk

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Aquaphobia

Member
Does the heater have a cover on it? It looks to me like the algae is on the inside of it, which would make sense to me since algae seems to like warm, still waters best.
 

alink

Member
Frankthetank1210 said:
Although not algae eaters per se, a dojo loach, rainbow shark, Pictus catfish( whom I do not often see eating the algae)

They have been that way for quite awhile so this isn't something I just started noticing all of a sudden

It is not near window

Light may be I around 8 hours per day( starting to keep closer track now)

Just one, it's a tall bamboo stalk

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Okay thanks for answering the questions.

You are right, those are not algae eaters. The loach and shark might graze on it occasionally but it is not their main source of food as you know. I never heard of Pictus eating algae, interesting! Depending on the size of your tank and stocking, you might be able to add something that will eat more of the algae. If you want to tell us the size and current stocking, we can give you some suggestions. However, don't just get an algae eater to eat the algae. Get one because you want one, otherwise don't get it and just clean the algae when you decide its too much for your liking.

Good. Direct or even a lot of indirect sunlight will lead to algae blooms.

8 hours a day is great! If algae becomes a problem, you may want to split the light periods to 4 hours on, 4 hours off, 4 hours on, 12 hours off. You can also get a timer ($5-$20+) that you can set to be on for certain amount of time, more expensive ones allow you to program it when to come on and turn off, and even vary it day to day if you wish. I like it because it allows the schedule to go on without a hitch even if you aren't home.

Okay, the reason I asked about the plants is algae will steal the nutrients your plants need, which then will effect your plants ability to feed and grow. On a side note, does your bamboo have leaves? If so, they should be at or above the water level or the bamboo plant will die (just learned this today because I just got a lucky bamboo plant and was duped into thinking it was fully aquatic).

I will agree with the others that its not that much algae. The amount of algae in a tank is up to you to decide what you like. Some like it because it appears more normal. Some will do everything they can to get rid of it because they hate the way it looks or what it does for their plants. On its own, algae won't harm your water, and will actually keep the water a little bit cleaner of nitrogen cycle molecules. If you aren't heavily planted then it shouldnt be a problem having some in your tank.
 
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Frankthetank1210

Member
Wow thanks for the response, a lot of useful information.

Good to know about the bamboo

I do want an algae eater not just to have one

Current stock:
5 neon tetras
6 tiger barbs
1 rainbow shark
1 Pictus catfish
1 dojo loach
1 black Red tail variatus

What would my options be?
I've been told not to get a pleco but I saw one in the store yesterday( think it was a pleco) that looked awesome. I'll attach a picture to see if someone can tell me what it is.



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alink

Member
Okay, what is the size of the tank these fish are in? That would help in determining what, if any, could be added.
 

Plecomaker

Member
That's alotof fish, how big is this tank?
if its crowded, excess nitrates may be responsible for extra algae.
its pretty normal for sharks too eat algae. All he ones ive seen eat quite a bit, but Pictus, ive never seen eat it.

as for plecs,I'm a fan. I think some look more liek salt water. Sharks, then redtails do.
if someone told you not to get them,it may be a specific type, some don't eat algae at all and other get ridiculously big.
 

Bithimala

Member
Plecos are awesome, but they get really big, and need a lot of space.
 

Plecomaker

Member
Bithimala said:
Plecos are awesome, but they get really big, and need a lot of space.
Size ranges from an inch too a few feet!
ottos are tiny plecs, but might not be safe with your other guys. I use bristlenoses the most, theyre about 4 inches. Rubber
ip are roughly the same size. Pitbulls are smaller.

howbig is the tank?
 

alink

Member
Plecomaker said:
I use bristlenoses the most, theyre about 4 inches.
Tell that to my BN plec that is 4.5" (5" with tail) and still growing! LOL! From less to an inch to 4.5" in about 8 months.. I think this one might get to 6" with tail, but I hear that is rare in the hobby. Most BN will only get about 4 inches, you are right on that.
 

Plecomaker

Member
alink said:
Tell that to my BN plec that is 4.5" (5" with tail) and still growing! LOL! From less to an inch to 4.5" in about 8 months.. I think this one might get to 6" with tail, but I hear that is rare in the hobby. Most BN will only get about 4 inches, you are right on that.
I think most people get nervous because they see commons, but there are so many smaller ones. Pitbulls are the ones I'm looking at next and theyre great for planted tanks.
 
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Frankthetank1210

Member
The tank is 55 gallon

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alink

Member
In a 55g, I think a BN plec would be okay. There are several color variants to them but any would be okay. If you don't like the BN, then there are many others that will eat algae and stay small, but aren't as commonly sold in store so you may have to buy online and pay more for them. Be sure this is something you want, because most plecs can live over 10 years.
 

Redshark1

Member
It's natural to have algae in an aquarium. Look in any stream, river or lake and you will see it covering rocks etc.

You can learn to love it. I have algae like a river and I am used to it. it's not necessarily a problem.

 
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Frankthetank1210

Member
Redshark1 said:
It's natural to have algae in an aquarium. Look in any stream, river or lake and you will see it covering rocks etc.

You can learn to love it. I have algae like a river and I am used to it. it's not necessarily a problem.

I don't see any algae in there, is it the white stuff?
What type fish are those?

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Redshark1

Member
Algae is growing on the white roots and branches but it isn't a problem for me. There are Clown Loaches and Congo Tetras visible in the aquarium plus Bristlenoses which are harder to see.

Often algae can be a problem, but is not always.

Sometimes we are programmed to find certain things unacceptable without reason including algae and snails.

Somebody visited my house and, looking into my planted tank, loudly proclaimed "There are snails in your aquarium, you are not supposed to have those". But it is easier for me to retain my Malaysian Trumpet Snails than to get rid of them and besides I find them interesting and a welcome part of my "ecosystem".
 
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Frankthetank1210

Member
And the snails have done well?

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Caleb12345

Member
Redshark1 said:
It's natural to have algae in an aquarium. Look in any stream, river or lake and you will see it covering rocks etc.

You can learn to love it. I have algae like a river and I am used to it. it's not necessarily a problem.

But off topic but very jealous of those clown loaches. Beautiful they have gotten that big.


 

Redshark1

Member
Thanks the Clown Loaches are the result of twenty years of dedication.

Its funny I get negative comments about my algae, snails and undergravel filtration but I still have much to be proud of.

If algae is a matter of personal taste that is fair enough but it does no harm and probably does some good unless it stops you checking on your fish LOL!
 

Plecomaker

Member
Redshark1 said:
Thanks the Clown Loaches are the result of twenty years of dedication.

Its funny I get negative comments about my algae, snails and undergravel filtration but I still have much to be proud of.

If algae is a matter of personal taste that is fair enough but it does no harm and probably does some good unless it stops you checking on your fish LOL!
I would neverbe the pleco breederI am without it
 

Krysty

Member
I have algae in my tank as well.
When I do my water changes I clean excess off of the side of the tank, otherwise I let it grow naturally.
I've always wondered if there was an easier way to keep it in check if anyone has suggestions. My tank is not by a window, but does occasionally get some direct sunlight from across the room. (most of the time curtains and blinds are closed.)
How many hours per day do you all suggest a light to stay on? I also have LED "nightlight" on my main tank. Maybe I should consider a timer?
 

Redshark1

Member
Well if you get a timer you can then experiment.
 

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