Too Many filters?

hamstermann

Member
Is there such a thing as too many filters? I'm going to be getting a new tank stand tonight so my 2 ten gallons can be next to each other and on the same level. Then I'm going to set up a canister filter and siphon system to filter both tanks, but while the canister is building up its bacteria colonies, I'll still be running the HOB filters that have been on the tanks. Is that too much filtration/current? In the tanks I'll have 3 guppies and 3 platys.
 

Butterfly

Member
As long as the water flow back into the tank isn't too rough for your fish I don't think you can over filter.
Carol
 

Trpimp147

Member
a friend of mine has 3 HOB emporer filters and 2 power heads on his tank 55 gal but that's to create high flow for his fish due to tahts what kind of water currents they need to live in to make the water like home.
 

darkwolf29a

Member
Currently, I'm running a sump (to a 10 gallon - It'll have java moss in it soon, I hope) which creates some flow, a canister filter, and a HOB. Soon the HOB will be moving to the sump, so as not create any extra flow. In short...No, I don't think you can filter too much, as long as your fish don't mind the current.

I angle my outlets so as not to have too much at a time. I point them at each other, so I create a offsetting currents.
 

timg

Member
What is the purpose of a filter? To filter the water and remove the nasties.

Personally, I can see no real benefit to having more filtration than you need, as once the water is clean, it's clean, no matter how many extra filters you put it through, it won't get any cleaner unless the additional filter has a specific purpose, such as nitrate removal. You cannot culture bacteria in it unless you increase the bio-load, if the filter(s) you have are effective, the suspended matter has already been removed by them, and most filters are capable of holding activated carbon to remove trace elements and meds, so what's to be gained?

If you are intending to colonise your canister filter, you actually need to do one of two things: REDUCE the filtration from the hobs or INCREASE the bio-load, otherwise the media will not colonise successfully. I would suggest that you remove half the media from one hob for a week, then shut one hob down at the end of the second week, allowing the bacteria to colonise the canister. third week you could follow the above with the second hob, or just leave it there, your choice. The other option is just to get more fish, but here you would be looking at over-stocking, which isn't a good idea.

The other question is which is the better filter? Which has the best throughput, best filtration, easiest maintenance, quietest operation? Do you NEED all the filters? Why make work?
 
  • Thread Starter

hamstermann

Member
yeah, the hobs were just there to keep the water livable for the fish while the colonies built up in the canister filter. basically, I was trying to avoid a mini-cycle or a full-cycle so no fish died.
 

darkwolf29a

Member
hamstermann said:
yeah, the hobs were just there to keep the water livable for the fish while the colonies built up in the canister filter. basically, I was trying to avoid a mini-cycle or a full-cycle so no fish died.
I have reduced the output of my HOB so as to facilitate the building of the bacteria. I figure another week and I should able to remove the HOB completely.

I used this, partially, as an experiment. To see if I could build another filter system without another tank. Obviously, this would have it's uses later. So far, I'm pleased with the results, as the tank water is very clean and I'm getting good bacteria growth in the new filter.I want the canister versus the HOB because of the reduced current and the reduced necessity of real estate on the back, i.e. I can see through more of the aquarium....a plus, considering it sits between my desk and the TV, so I get to watch the TV and the tank at the same time.
 

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