To Euthanise Or Not To Euthanise?

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
Hey everyone,

So I picked up a few cherry barbs from a relative's tank, only to notice they are in extremely bad shape. I've attached a couple of photos - one of them has its tail completely ripped off, one can barely swim, looks a little malformed and is mostly drifting, and another is swimming very weirdly. All are alive but none of them can swim properly, and I'm particularly worried about the first two. Essentially I think they've all been bullied to the point of near-death.

My question is, should I pull them out and euthanise them? I don't have a quarantine tank yet, so I'm very low on options. It kills me to see them look so rough, and with how bad they look I'm seriously doubting whether a recovery is even possible.

Note: my water parameters are pristine, but I'm not sure on the tank they came from. They're currently in with five guppies, two wood shrimp and four amano shrimp.
IMG_20180515_191846.jpg
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
OneLittleBubble said:
Euthanize humanely if it is affecting the quality of their life.
I've got some dental anasthetic I can use, so it would be humane. My worry is that even if they can recover, they'll be in this horrific state until they do. I don't really know what's best. You reckon it's best to do it?
 

OneLittleBubble

Well Known Member
Messages
529
Reaction score
109
Points
38
Experience
5 to 10 years
If they can recover let them. It will make their life better in the long run. For euthanizing I recommend clove oil. To be honest I don't know what dental anasthetic is. As long as it is painless and quick then it should be fine.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
OneLittleBubble said:
If they can recover let them. It will make their life better in the long run. For euthanizing I recommend clove oil. To be honest I don't know what dental anasthetic is. As long as it is painless and quick then it should be fine.
Sorry, it is actually clove oil - my mistake.

I guess my issue is I don't know if they can recover or not. Can a fish recover from having no tail? Is a fish that's just drifting through with the current and otherwise lying on the bottom going to get better?

Gah, so many unknowns.
 

finnipper59

Well Known Member
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
387
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
Euthanizing them may be the kindest thing that you can do for THEM...but what about you pristine tank. Did you put them in their? If so, you could euthanize them and put them out of misery, but you could have infected your tank with columnaris. It's contagious and infect fish even in the most pristine water. Not so much like some diseases that take advantage of fish in poorly kept in dirty tanks like popeye disease. If the fish have columnaris, your entire tank is infected. If you let one die in the tank, you'll have an explosive infection because the columnaris paracites will let go of the dead host in search of a live one...like your origional fish. Euthanize all the fish you were given and treat your whole tank for columnaris.
Aphelion0 said:
Hey everyone,

So I picked up a few cherry barbs from a relative's tank, only to notice they are in extremely bad shape. I've attached a couple of photos - one of them has its tail completely ripped off, one can barely swim, looks a little malformed and is mostly drifting, and another is swimming very weirdly. All are alive but none of them can swim properly, and I'm particularly worried about the first two. Essentially I think they've all been bullied to the point of near-death.

My question is, should I pull them out and euthanise them? I don't have a quarantine tank yet, so I'm very low on options. It kills me to see them look so rough, and with how bad they look I'm seriously doubting whether a recovery is even possible.

Note: my water parameters are pristine, but I'm not sure on the tank they came from. They're currently in with five guppies, two wood shrimp and four amano shrimp.View attachment 438381
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
finnipper59 said:
Euthanizing them may be the kindest thing that you can do for THEM...but what about you pristine tank. Did you put them in their? If so, you could euthanize them and put them out of misery, but you could have infected your tank with columnaris. It's contagious and infect fish even in the most pristine water. Not so much like some diseases that take advantage of fish in poorly kept in dirty tanks like popeye disease. If the fish have columnaris, your entire tank is infected. If you let one die in the tank, you'll have an explosive infection because the columnaris paracites will let go of the dead host in search of a live one...like your origional fish. Euthanize all the fish you were given and treat your whole tank for columnaris.
Thanks for your reply. So, according to the previous owner they've been like this for a while. Honestly they don't look sick, they just look beaten up. All the fish in their previous tank are very healthy, so we can eliminate disease/infection, correct?
 

Ms rose

Well Known Member
Messages
633
Reaction score
276
Points
63
Experience
Just started
if in fact they were just bullied and beat up, give them time to recover. as long as they dont look sick and the other tanks fish are healthy. if this is the case im sure time will get them happy n healthy again. but if its illness then i would euthenize just to put them out of their missery as they sound to far gone to treat. but i would say from info provided they are just the typical bullied fish and just need time to rest and recoer
 

finnipper59

Well Known Member
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
387
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
Aphelion0 said:
Thanks for your reply. So, according to the previous owner they've been like this for a while. Honestly they don't look sick, they just look beaten up. All the fish in their previous tank are very healthy, so we can eliminate disease/infection, correct?
They're already in your tank, so try to save them if you want. Columnaris can start off looking like ich, or fin rot. Some fish that look perfectly healthy can be found dead the day after because the bacteria did all their damage on the inside of the fish. If you want to believe that all these fish are just victims of bullying, then go ahead and try to heal them. As I said, they're already in your tank , so good luck.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #10

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
Okay thanks guys.

Interestingly, after a closer study I think they might be showing signs of ammonia poisoning. I'm really not sure what to think at this stage!
 

finnipper59

Well Known Member
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
387
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
If the fish are that bad off because of ammonia poisoning, then at this point the gills are too damaged for the fish to recover. Gill tissue doesn't grow back. But with the different symptoms mentioned, I'm convinced that you have a case of columnaris in your tank. I really do recommend treatment for the whole tank. Go to Google and type in Treatment for Freshwater Aquarium Columnaris.
finnipper59 said:
They're already in your tank, so try to save them if you want. Columnaris can start off looking like ich, or fin rot. Some fish that look perfectly healthy can be found dead the day after because the bacteria did all their damage on the inside of the fish. If you want to believe that all these fish are just victims of bullying, then go ahead and try to heal them. As I said, they're already in your tank , so good luck.
 

wodesorel

Well Known Member
Messages
903
Reaction score
683
Points
178
Experience
More than 10 years
finnipper59 said:
If you let one die in the tank, you'll have an explosive infection because the columnaris paracites will let go of the dead host in search of a live one...like your origional fish.
Columnaris is bacterial, not parasitic. That's not how the disease works at all.
 

finnipper59

Well Known Member
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
387
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
wodesorel said:
Columnaris is bacterial, not parasitic. That's not how the disease works at all.
Yes. Columnaris is a gram negative bacteria, but it is a parasitic bacteria that can only survive on a living host and it can't survive very long once it's off the host. A dead fish will be attacked by a lot of different bacteria including the good bacteria Nitrosomas...and unfortunately, various fungi. So it is how it works. It's not a multicellular paracite like a gill fluke or nematode, but it's considered a parasitic bacteria because it must live on a live host. Treatments for Columnaris are gram negative antibiotics...not antiparacitic medication. I understand your confusion about my terminology.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #14

Aphelion0

New Member
Messages
43
Reaction score
8
Points
33
Experience
5 to 10 years
Okay, so they could hardly swim and they all seemed to be past the point of no return by late this evening. I decided to go ahead with it.

Sleep good, cherries.
 

finnipper59

Well Known Member
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
387
Points
73
Experience
More than 10 years
Somtimes good decisions are hard to make. I'm proud of you for your courage, but I understand your sadness for having to do it. Bless you.
Aphelion0 said:
Okay, so they could hardly swim and they all seemed to be past the point of no return by late this evening. I decided to go ahead with it.

Sleep good, cherries.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom