Tips On Fixing Ph That’s Too Basic?

Starflyr3

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we have super hard water at my house. We have a whole house filter that takes out the chlorine and such.

But, we have a pool, and we CONSTANTLY have to dump in acid to keep it at a decent pH (we have respirators and everything)

My tank is sitting at 8.5-9, and I can’t get it down. I’ve added almond leaves and such, but with the fin rot treatment and 50% daily water changes, it’s not doing much.

I don’t want to play with chemicals and stress him out more unless I really know how to use them

Any tips?

ETA:
Parameters

GH: 30
KH: max
pH: 8.5-9
0 ammonia, nitrites and nitrates


I do have a phone appt with a fish vet tomorrow.

If needed, I’ll have her come out, but it’s 4x the cost of the phone consult, and I already have 2 “Golden” Guinean pigs (broken leg on one from a car wreck on the way to the vet and spay issues on the other, resulting in about $2000 vet bills for each $15 piggy).
 

SM1199

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Oh my god, 2k spent on a guinea pig! (My boyfriend says they better poop gold nuggets :hilarious We're both pre-vet majors working at vet clinics, so we understand.

Anyway, betta fish do prefer lower pHs, but are able to acclimate to a wide variety of pHs. Do you think the pH is affecting your betta at all? How long have you had him? I would worry about getting caught up on the nitrogen cycle first - your profile says you don't know about it, and I'm assuming the nitrogen cycle in your tank (or lack of) is the cause of his fin rot. Really, pH should be an afterthought right now. Also, many people including myself will argue that it's better for your fish to keep pH consistent than it is to obtain a certain value or range. Altering pH gets complicated and often leads to swings, especially during/after water changes, that can kill your fish much more easily and readily than the "incorrect" pH can.

Good luck with your vet call!
 

david1978

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Kh is your waters ability to hold your ph. With it that high simple things like leaves and driftwood will have very little if any effect on it. Really the only way you will be able to lower your ph consistently is go rodI and remineralize it to what you want. I think an ro buddy is around $100.
 
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Starflyr3

Starflyr3

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SM1199 said:
Oh my god, 2k spent on a guinea pig! (My boyfriend says they better poop gold nuggets :hilarious We're both pre-vet majors working at vet clinics, so we understand.

Anyway, betta fish do prefer lower pHs, but are able to acclimate to a wide variety of pHs. Do you think the pH is affecting your betta at all? How long have you had him? I would worry about getting caught up on the nitrogen cycle first - your profile says you don't know about it, and I'm assuming the nitrogen cycle in your tank (or lack of) is the cause of his fin rot. Really, pH should be an afterthought right now. Also, many people including myself will argue that it's better for your fish to keep pH consistent than it is to obtain a certain value or range. Altering pH gets complicated and often leads to swings, especially during/after water changes, that can kill your fish much more easily and readily than the "incorrect" pH can.

Good luck with your vet call!

I’ve learned quite a bit in the last few days, honestly. I had to move him, the old aquarium was small (2.5G), probably had crappy water AND was leaking a LOT, and he was likely overfed because my 7 yo has him in her room.

I *think* his fins got injured when she took him to school in a small portable tank that was set up with water from the old aquarium, (my husband netted him after I told him not to) and fin rot set in after that.

So yeah, I’m cycling with him in, but 1) I was dumb/ignorant and 2) didn’t have much of a choice.

Thanks for the reply
 

-Mak-

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As david said, the KH being that high means you won't be able to affect ph. You can remove KH with an RO system or by using a buffered plants substrate. The substrate strips KH from the water and brings pH down to 6.0 to 7.0 depending on the quality of substrate. However, the buffering capacity runs out, and having a high KH will probably exhaust it faster.
 

JenC

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If the tank is small (the 10 gallon in your profile?) you could use purchased spring water as long as it tested with good parameters. You could use it in full or cut your tap water 50/50 depending upon the spring water's parameters. In the US it would cost maybe $1/gallon at a grocery store or 25¢/gallon from a filling station.
 
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Starflyr3

Starflyr3

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We have a whole house water filter (Aquasana EQ400), and I don't really have the cash to constantly buy water. The fish vet I talked to today on the phone said I could do driftwood or almond leaves if I want to (I have the leaves in) but because the kH is so high, it won't do much. She also said since it's stable, and he's been in it for a year, just leave it, as having it swing often would be too stressful.

Thanks for the replies!
 

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