Tiny Bugs And Possible Coral?

Adriifu

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Hello! I have a ten-gallon set up with one yellow watchman goby, a tiger pistol shrimp, two hermit crabs, and a turbo snail. It’s been running for almost five months. I was having some trouble with ammonia, but I got live rock and I think everything is finally settled. I’ll be getting my water tested today just to make sure. I was looking at the glass earlier and found tiny white specks. I thought they were just grains of sand at first, but they’re moving around. It looks like they have legs as well. There are so many on the glass that it’s hard to count. I also found a brittle starfish, a possible bristleworm, and a tiny snail. It had a white shell and looked as if it had legs similar to that of the bugs. Then there was one more thing that I believe is a coral. I just don’t know what type. Can someone please identify everything in the pictures? Including the other soft corals (three of them: I think two of them are mushrooms). They were given to me for free, but the species was never given. By the way: my goby seems to love the bugs. He eats them all the time when they’re swimming around in the water column. I can’t get a picture of them because they’re so small.
 

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Lorekeeper

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The little bugs are likely pods. Good for your tank, and a great food source for some fish!

The coral in the first picture is some sort of softy, although I can't really name a species. Maybe some sort of Kenya tree? I'll link @stella1979 to see if she can help.

The thing in the last picture looks somewhat like an aptaisia, although I'm not sure on that either.
 

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Could you take closer pics of the corals you want to identify please? I definitely see a mushroom, but at this distance, it's tough to tell what kind.

The tiny bugs are almost certainly pods! Congrats, that's a great thing.

I'm afraid the last picture is an aiptasia, which is a pest anemone. They can overpopulate, sting corals, compete for food with corals... all and all just not a good thing, and they are tough to get rid of.
 

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People hate aptaisia, and yet I still can't get any! I'd totally set up a jar with one on my desk

But yeah, they're no good in a reef tank. There are a bunch of methods to get rid of them, but make sure to get them as soon as you see them with whatever method you choose. I've heard that injecting them with hydrogen peroxide, lemon juice, or Aptaisia X will usually kill the one you inject.

Good luck!
 

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I've been battling aiptasia for months now. I use Aiptasia X once or twice a week, but they keep coming back. It's also difficult to inject very small ones, and every day that they are living in your tank there is a possibility of them spreading. Also, when they are attacked, their defense mechanism is to propagate so if there is even a tiny piece of their base left, it will release spores and more will grow.

I could try using Aiptasia X more frequently, but it has not been a real solution for me so far and I find it impossible to get the tiny ones. I still use it because sometimes one will pop up in a place that it will irritate a coral, or just because I can't stand to look at them, especially once they've grown a bit. I honestly think the injection method is making the problem worse though, as their population has only increased over time. I mean, they're not everywhere, but the amount of new ones is increasing exponentially.

This isn't to say that I think the injection method is a terrible idea, but I do think that the issue needs to be handled firmly and quickly so as to not allow them to take a foothold. I'm afraid once or twice a week hasn't been enough for me. I've had them since first putting pesty chaeto in my fuge, which was more than 6 months ago. I feel my only solution now is berghia nudibranchs, and they are pricey little critters. :meh:

All that said... I'd love a pest tank! I'd go with majanos though, and possibly a mantis shrimp.
 
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Adriifu

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Awesome. I’ll make sure to get rid of the Aiptasia. I’m at the mall right now, so I’ll get better pictures of the soft coral right when I get home. Is it possible that I could move the Aiptasia somewhere else, perhaps a jar like @Lorekeeper mentioned? If so, how do I care for it?

EDIT: I got my water checked. Everything’s perfect.
 

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I can't do mantis shrimp! The little things kinda creep me out. Peacocks are pretty, but I don't think I'd choose it over something more flashy that I'd have to dedicate a tank to.

If I was going to seriously do a pest tank (maybe the 5.5 at some point after it's done being used...) it'd probably end up filled with majanos and some of the white aptasia, along with a few pesty corals. Probably just a bunch of grass shrimp, and maybe some Malaysian Trumpets as well.

To the OP, you can keep them in a jar with no flow and heater, all you'll really need is a desk lamp with a decent bulb. But, you definitely need to kill as many as possible in your tank. Maybe take a large one with some color (if you have a variety with some basic color) and let it attach to some rock rubble in the jar with some old saltwater. Keep the lamp on for 12 hours a day, and feed a piece of mysis or something like that every few weeks.
 
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Adriifu

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Lorekeeper said:
I can't do mantis shrimp! The little things kinda creep me out. Peacocks are pretty, but I don't think I'd choose it over something more flashy that I'd have to dedicate a tank to.

If I was going to seriously do a pest tank (maybe the 5.5 at some point after it's done being used...) it'd probably end up filled with majanos and some of the white aptasia, along with a few pesty corals. Probably just a bunch of grass shrimp, and maybe some Malaysian Trumpets as well.

To the OP, you can keep them in a jar with no flow and heater, all you'll really need is a desk lamp with a decent bulb. But, you definitely need to kill as many as possible in your tank. Maybe take a large one with some color (if you have a variety with some basic color) and let it attach to some rock rubble in the jar with some old saltwater. Keep the lamp on for 12 hours a day, and feed a piece of mysis or something like that every few weeks.
Awesome. Not even an air stone is needed? I’ve only seen this little guy, but I’ll keep looking out for others. Can I put the lid on the jar?
 

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If there's one in there, there's probably a few more.

Nope, not even an airstone. I'd say that you probably want some sort of O2 exchange (so I wouldn't seal the jar), but they won't really care.

I actually keep some macroalgae in a mason jar on my windowsill with no heat or water movement. The stuff has done better than it does in my actual tank...
 
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Adriifu

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Lorekeeper said:
If there's one in there, there's probably a few more.

Nope, not even an airstone. I'd say that you probably want some sort of O2 exchange (so I wouldn't seal the jar), but they won't really care.

I actually keep some macroalgae in a mason jar on my windowsill with no heat or water movement. The stuff has done better than it does in my actual tank...
Nice Will 25-50% water changes weekly work?
 

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I wouldn't put a lid on the jar. Can you sacrifice the rock that it's on and just put that rock into the jar? Or, take the rock out of the tank and put it in another container with some tank water and a light. Try to get the pest to open up outside of the tank, and do any removal in that container. Then you could rinse the rock very well, or heck, I might even sanitize it with something like muriatic acid. After such a long battle, I'd do anything to prevent the spread of these guys in the display tank.
 
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Adriifu

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stella1979 said:
I wouldn't put a lid on the jar. Can you sacrifice the rock that it's on and just put that rock into the jar? Or, take the rock out of the tank and put it in another container with some tank water and a light. Try to get the pest to open up outside of the tank, and do any removal in that container. Then you could rinse the rock very well, or heck, I might even sanitize it with something like muriatic acid. After such a long battle, I'd do anything to prevent the spread of these guys in the display tank.
Sure, I’ll try to do that. Thanks
 

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For water changes, I wouldn't even worry about that. Maybe dump out some water every 2-3 weeks and replace with old tank water. These things don't produce a ton of waste, and aren't going to be super picky about conditions.
 
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Adriifu

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Lorekeeper said:
For water changes, I wouldn't even worry about that. Maybe dump out some water every 2-3 weeks and replace with old tank water. These things don't produce a ton of waste, and aren't going to be super picky about conditions.
Alright. Thank you so much for all the help. I’ll be back soon with some more pictures.
 

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First is definitely a mushroom, and the last is definitely some sort of zoa or paly.

To get the zoas to stay put, get some super glue gel (gorilla glue works well) and glue it to a rock.
 
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Adriifu

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Lorekeeper said:
First is definitely a mushroom, and the last is definitely some sort of zoa or paly.

To get the zoas to stay put, get some super glue gel (gorilla glue works well) and glue it to a rock.
Alright, thanks. I’m getting the jar set up right now.
 

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Looks like a nice discossoma shroom in the first pic.

Forgive me off you've mentioned this already... Is the 2nd coral pictured hard or soft? Could be a Kenya tree, (soft), but it also kinda looks like a birds nest, (hard.)

3rd guy is tough. It sorta looks like a type of mushroom too, but I'm not sure. Is it bumpy? Does it move itself? For some reason I'm wondering if it could be a carpet anemone.
 
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Adriifu

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stella1979 said:
Looks like a nice discossoma shroom in the first pic.

Forgive me off you've mentioned this already... Is the 2nd coral pictured hard or soft? Could be a Kenya tree, (soft), but it also kinda looks like a birds nest, (hard.)

3rd guy is tough. It sorta looks like a type of mushroom too, but I'm not sure. Is it bumpy? Does it move itself? For some reason I'm wondering if it could be a carpet anemone.
The guys at my LFS told me they’d give me a couple soft corals for free to start with, so I’m assuming these are all soft. The third guy looks similar to the first when in light. He’s very soft as well, not bumpy at all. I can also see his mouth if I look closely enough. I’ve tried moving him on the rock, but he always ends up wedging himself somewhere in between the rock and sand. He also doesn’t seem to like the light very much.
 
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