Thoughts on API Furan-2?

bettafairy
  • #1
I’ve recently purchased some Furan-2 to try and heal my bettas fin rot. I was wondering what the general opinion is towards it, and if there’s anything better I can treat him with. I’ve heard that Kanaplex is beneficial for fin rot, but I’m not sure if Furan will work any better.
 

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Fishstery
  • #2
I’ve recently purchased some Furan-2 to try and heal my bettas fin rot. I was wondering what the general opinion is towards it, and if there’s anything better I can treat him with. I’ve heard that Kanaplex is beneficial for fin rot, but I’m not sure if Furan will work any better.
Furan is a good antibacterial, but you should rule out either fungal or bacterial infection before deciding on a treatment. Bacterial fin rot usually makes the fins look more like melted plastic, where there may be a pinkish red wound or lesion in the affected area. Fungal usually takes the form of a fluffy white cotton on the fins. If fungus is the case then api fungus cure will work better. If you are unsure which it is, post a picture of the fin rot and the members here can help figure out what you're dealing with so you can use the proper treatment. Additionally, api claims that you can use any of their medication line in conjunction with each other (so technically you could treat bacterial and fungal at the same time by using furan in conjuction with fungus cure) which I have done with bettas in the past, but I wouldn't easily advise you to medicate for something you don't need to. I would use the api line, kanaplex is a great medication but very hard on the kidneys. I only use it for very severe infections and dropsy.
 

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MacZ
  • #3
but very hard on the kidneys. I only use it for very severe infections and dropsy.

Dropsy is a sign of (beginning and acute) kidney failure, meds that are hard on the kidneys usually just speed up the inevitable when used on fish with that symptom.
 
bettafairy
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Furan is a good antibacterial, but you should rule out either fungal or bacterial infection before deciding on a treatment. Bacterial fin rot usually makes the fins look more like melted plastic, where there may be a pinkish red wound or lesion in the affected area. Fungal usually takes the form of a fluffy white cotton on the fins. If fungus is the case then api fungus cure will work better. If you are unsure which it is, post a picture of the fin rot and the members here can help figure out what you're dealing with so you can use the proper treatment. Additionally, api claims that you can use any of their medication line in conjunction with each other (so technically you could treat bacterial and fungal at the same time by using furan in conjuction with fungus cure) which I have done with bettas in the past, but I wouldn't easily advise you to medicate for something you don't need to. I would use the api line, kanaplex is a great medication but very hard on the kidneys. I only use it for very severe infections and dropsy.
He doesn’t have any white fluff, it’s just really bad tears and rotted fins. I added some of the furan to his tank water last night.
 

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Fishstery
  • #5
Dropsy is a sign of (beginning and acute) kidney failure, meds that are hard on the kidneys usually just speed up the inevitable when used on fish with that symptom.
Thats not necessarily true. Kanaplex is one of the few known medications to cure dropsy. I'd know because I cured my betta of dropsy with kanaplex, ethromycin, and furan dosed all together with epsom baths. See my thread on my profile if you're interested, if caught early enough it can be done. It's hard on the system but with something with such a high fatality rate like dropsy there's nothing left to lose. My betta is now 3 months post dropsy and still doing very well :)
He doesn’t have any white fluff, it’s just really bad tears and rotted fins. I added some of the furan to his tank water last night.
Furan should help but know it will kill your cycle so remove any filter media asap and run it in a bucket dosed with a little ammonia. A more gentle option is methylene blue (which also kills BB) or almond leaves.
 
MacZ
  • #6
Thats not necessarily true. Kanaplex is one of the few known medications to cure dropsy. I'd know because I cured my betta of dropsy with kanaplex, ethromycin, and furan dosed all together with epsom baths. See my thread on my profile if you're interested, if caught early enough it can be done. It's hard on the system but with something with such a high fatality rate like dropsy there's nothing left to lose. My betta is now 3 months post dropsy and still doing very well :)

I'm not a friend of using antibiotics on such cases. Against bacterial infections showing dropsy, I have had good success with waterchange treatments combined with alder cones and IALs.
I am fully aware antibiotics work, I just just don't think it's a good idea to treat every infection with them. Longterm that has lead to too many restistant pathogens.
Can't obtain any anyway. All are prescription meds and finding a vet who will prescribe it for fish is hard. Unless there are hundreds of Euros worth of fish at stake every vet here will tell you to euthanize or do waterchange treatments.
 

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Fishstery
  • #7
I'm not a friend of using antibiotics on such cases. Against bacterial infections showing dropsy, I have had good success with waterchange treatments combined with alder cones and IALs.
I am fully aware antibiotics work, I just just don't think it's a good idea to treat every infection with them. Longterm that has lead to too many restistant pathogens.
Can't obtain any anyway. All are prescription meds and finding a vet who will prescribe it for fish is hard. Unless there are hundreds of Euros worth of fish at stake every vet here will tell you to euthanize or do waterchange treatments.
I think we may have gotten into this debate some years ago already LOL :) I'm in the US so medications are readily available to me. I suppose to some people their fish are less of a hobby and more like pets, so many of us may be willing to use a more drastic measure in order to save our friends. At any rate, I definitely acknowledge your opinion and the truth behind it, my first defense with fin rot is daily water changes in conjunction with methylene blue. Looks like OP already is dosing furan anyways, although I did recommend methylene blue or almond leaves as well
 
MacZ
  • #8
Not years, as I'm only here for almost 18 months, but probably would have. It's too late on my side of the pond for a long debate anyhow. :D

I just can say, the recommendation of waterchanges, m-blue and IALS speaks for you as a fishkeeper. I just felt in this thread here another voice of warning concerning antibiotics (I can't stop anybody anyway, so I just hope disclaimers help.) was appropriate. ;)
 
Fishstery
  • #9
Not years, as I'm only here for almost 18 months, but probably would have. It's too late on my side of the pond for a long debate anyhow. :D

I just can say, the recommendation of waterchanges, m-blue and IALS speaks for you as a fishkeeper. I just felt in this thread here another voice of warning concerning antibiotics (I can't stop anybody anyway, so I just hope disclaimers help.) was appropriate. ;)
Most definitely! I think it's important to educate people on the negative affects of things like that, otherwise you normally wouldn't consider the outside environment a factor when fiddling with home aquaria. It's a shame how many wild species have already been decimated or bloodlines ruined due to the hobby (overfarming, cross breeding) so the use of antibiotics in the hobby can definitely have a similar effect. I stay away from medication unless it's a severe issue where I feel my fish is suffering too much or less intensive treatments aren't working.
 
bettafairy
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
Furan should help but know it will kill your cycle so remove any filter media asap and run it in a bucket dosed with a little ammonia. A more gentle option is methylene blue (which also kills BB) or almond leaves.
I have a sponge filter in the tank have been doing regular water changes, I don’t have any ammonia on hand, and I do have almond leaves and beneficial bacteria in the tank and I pre soaked the leaves and added that water for extra tannins. I haven’t added any more furan since it hasn’t been 24 hours yet, but what am I supposed to do if I don’t have any ammonia? Will the tank cycle be fine after I do the water change recommend on the package? I also have been stupidly unaware of how contagious fin rot is, and forgot to wash my aquarium tongs after adding the leaves in my infected bettas tank, and used the tongs in my healthy bettas tank. I added aquarium salt to the healthy tank to kill any bacteria I may have introduced, because I am really paranoid about it. All of my tools are soaking in hot water right now. I feel like an idiot. My healthy betta fins are beautiful and have no sign of tears or rot, so I think as long as he has no open wounds and I continue with water changes to diminish the aquarium salt, I should be okay right? Sorry for all the additional questions.
Looks like OP already is dosing furan anyways, although I did recommend methylene blue or almond leaves as well
I decided to dose furan after seeing that his fin rot is bacterial, and being unable to find any methylene blue at my local pet store (even though they had quarantined bettas with blue liquid in them right in front of me) I added almond leaves to the tank as well. I haven’t done another aquarium salt bath since I first got him, since I’m afraid to over do things, but I really want his fins to get better.
 

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Fishstery
  • #11
I have a sponge filter in the tank have been doing regular water changes, I don’t have any ammonia on hand, and I do have almond leaves and beneficial bacteria in the tank and I pre soaked the leaves and added that water for extra tannins. I haven’t added any more furan since it hasn’t been 24 hours yet, but what am I supposed to do if I don’t have any ammonia? Will the tank cycle be fine after I do the water change recommend on the package? I also have been stupidly unaware of how contagious fin rot is, and forgot to wash my aquarium tongs after adding the leaves in my infected bettas tank, and used the tongs in my healthy bettas tank. I added aquarium salt to the healthy tank to kill any bacteria I may have introduced, because I am really paranoid about it. All of my tools are soaking in hot water right now. I feel like an idiot. My healthy betta fins are beautiful and have no sign of tears or rot, so I think as long as he has no open wounds and I continue with water changes to diminish the aquarium salt, I should be okay right? Sorry for all the additional questions.

I decided to dose furan after seeing that his fin rot is bacterial, and being unable to find any methylene blue at my local pet store (even though they had quarantined bettas with blue liquid in them right in front of me) I added almond leaves to the tank as well. I haven’t done another aquarium salt bath since I first got him, since I’m afraid to over do things, but I really want his fins to get better.
I wouldn't worry about infecting your other betta. Usually rot is an issue of water quality or stress so if your other betta is in good health and doesn't have a stress factor lowering its immunity it will be okay. All bacteria that causes infections in fish with the exception of some like columnaris are always present in the water. It's when an additional issue that causes a drop in the fish's immune system makes the fish vulnerable to infections from the bacteria. I would remove the furan from the water column asap to save your sponge. You can always run an airstone in your sick bettas tank and move the sponge to another occupied tank to treat your sick betta with meds and keep your cycle going. Before anyone recommends further treatment, I suggest you go to the disease section of the form where you will find the sick fish template sticky. Copy and paste it here and fill out the information so we can better help you. Treating your betta may just be putting a band-aid on the situation unless we find what caused your bettas fin rot to begin with. However I will say that with the long finned bettas, sometimes even with perfect water quality, good matinence regime and solid diet they will get rot for seemingly no rhyme or reason. It's most likely an unfortunate by product of over farming resulting in a lot of naturally weak and susceptible bettas, which is why I will only own plakats from now on.
 
bettafairy
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
I wouldn't worry about infecting your other betta. Usually rot is an issue of water quality or stress so if your other betta is in good health and doesn't have a stress factor lowering its immunity it will be okay. All bacteria that causes infections in fish with the exception of some like columnaris are always present in the water. It's when an additional issue that causes a drop in the fish's immune system makes the fish vulnerable to infections from the bacteria. I would remove the furan from the water column asap to save your sponge. You can always run an airstone in your sick bettas tank and move the sponge to another occupied tank to treat your sick betta with meds and keep your cycle going. Before anyone recommends further treatment, I suggest you go to the disease section of the form where you will find the sick fish template sticky. Copy and paste it here and fill out the information so we can better help you. Treating your betta may just be putting a band-aid on the situation unless we find what caused your bettas fin rot to begin with. However I will say that with the long finned bettas, sometimes even with perfect water quality, good matinence regime and solid diet they will get rot for seemingly no rhyme or reason. It's most likely an unfortunate by product of over farming resulting in a lot of naturally weak and susceptible bettas, which is why I will only own plakats from now on.
The main reason I have a sponge filter and not an airstone and a filter is because my LFS currently doesn’t have anymore air stones, and neither does the commercial pet store. I honestly could buy another sponge if this one will be ruined after the treatment is finished, since that’s all my pet store has in stock. I’m going there today, so I can pick up another sponge. Saving the bacteria inside the current sponge would be most desired but since the tank is practically new, I wouldn’t imagine there being much bacteria inside of it, at least enough to stop me from buying another one. Unless that is totally a bad idea, but if I’m unable to get an air stone I’m going to have to use the sponge filter.

What is the water volume of the tank? 6 gallons
How long has the tank been running? The tank was established for over a year with previous owner. Now that I own the fish, the tank has been set up with cycled and filtered water for three days now.
Does it have a filter? Yes, a sponge filter
Does it have a heater? Yes
What is the water temperature? 78
What is the entire stocking of this tank? (Please list all fish and inverts.) 1 Male Betta
1 yellow Amano shrimp
1 ghost shrimp

Maintenance
How often do you change the water? I change 15-25 percent of the water everyday or every other day. I do a 50 percent water change on all tanks every 1-2 weeks.
What do you use to treat your water? Prime
Do you vacuum the substrate or just the water? Both, but the sponge filter takes care of the substrate particles

*Parameters - Very Important
Did you cycle your tank before adding fish? I added cycled water from my healthy bettas tank, water from the fin rot bettas old tank, and new filtered and conditioned water.
What do you use to test the water? API master test kit and test strips
What are your parameters? We need to know the exact numbers, not just “fine” or “safe”.
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0-.25
Nitrate: 0
pH: 7.6

Feeding
How often do you feed your fish? I’ve only had him for three days, and he’s eaten twice since then.
How much do you feed your fish? 2-3 pieces of each time
Do you feed frozen or freeze-dried foods? Both

Illness & Symptoms
How long have you had this fish? 3 days
How long ago did you first notice these symptoms? Previous owner doesn’t know when fin rot started
In a few words, can you explain the symptoms? Torn and ripped looking fins.
Have you started any treatment for the illness? 1 aquarium salt bath the day I got him.
1 dose of furan
Almond leaves
Was your fish physically ill or injured upon purchase? I received him with fin rot.
How has its behavior and appearance changed, if at all? He is very active and eating.
 
Fishstery
  • #13
Okay here's the issue. The tank isn't cycled. You cannot cycle a tank by adding old water, infact adding old water is useless and you are only adding nitrates which is undesirable. Bacteria cling to porous surfaces, and there's very few free floating in the water. The reason the betta isn't doing well is because of the presence of nitrites which means you are now in the middle of a fishless cycle. Treating with medications won't help, just clean warm water. You want 0ppm for ammonia and nitrites and less than 20ppm nitrates. My suggestion is stop all treatment except for the almond leaves, and start doing daily 50% WCs and dose the entire tank volume with prime (not just the new water) for a few WEEKS. Typically it takes at least 3 weeks for a cycle to complete and be ready for fish. I'd say the presence of nitrites indicates that you have at least 2-3 more weeks to go. You will see nitrites spike up for a week or so, and then slowly see nitrates rise. At this point you are close close being cycled, but once ammonia and nitrite hit 0 do a large WC if nitrates are above 20 and then at that point you can start regular weekly WCs. Unfortunately your betta won't get better with the presence of ammonia or nitrites.
 
bettafairy
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Okay here's the issue. The tank isn't cycled. You cannot cycle a tank by adding old water, infact adding old water is useless and you are only adding nitrates which is undesirable. Bacteria cling to porous surfaces, and there's very few free floating in the water. The reason the betta isn't doing well is because of the presence of nitrites which means you are now in the middle of a fishless cycle. Treating with medications won't help, just clean warm water. You want 0ppm for ammonia and nitrites and less than 20ppm nitrates. My suggestion is stop all treatment except for the almond leaves, and start doing daily 50% WCs and dose the entire tank volume with prime (not just the new water) for a few WEEKS. Typically it takes at least 3 weeks for a cycle to complete and be ready for fish. I'd say the presence of nitrites indicates that you have at least 2-3 more weeks to go. You will see nitrites spike up for a week or so, and then slowly see nitrates rise. At this point you are close close being cycled, but once ammonia and nitrite hit 0 do a large WC if nitrates are above 20 and then at that point you can start regular weekly WCs. Unfortunately your betta won't get better with the presence of ammonia or nitrites.
Okay. Thank you so much. I’m going to do a 50% water change right now. Should I keep the same sponge filter or get another today? I’ll dose the entire tank with prime. The betta can stay in the tank through this right, as I have no where else for him to go until my parameters are better. At least they are better then the water conditions he was once in. I really want him to heal since his previous owner gave up on him, so I’m determined to save this betta and have a smoothly running tank.
 
Fishstery
  • #15
Okay. Thank you so much. I’m going to do a 50% water change right now. Should I keep the same sponge filter or get another today? I’ll dose the entire tank with prime. The betta can stay in the tank through this right, as I have no where else for him to go until my parameters are better. At least they are better then the water conditions he was once in. I really want him to heal since his previous owner gave up on him, so I’m determined to save this betta and have a smoothly running tank.
Definitely keep the sponge since you have already started to process ammonia. But remove all the furan to save what's left of your bacteria. Your betta will be fine given you keep up on the water changes and make sure to add the prime, and make sure to temperature match the new water (I pull the tank thermometer out and use it to temp match the tap water).
 

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