The Saddle Has Returned

Discussion in 'Ghost Shrimp' started by FoulFishes, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. FoulFishes

    FoulFishes Valued Member Member

    I currently have a female Ghost Shrimp in a tank all by herself, with other fish but no other shrimps. She gave birth sometime during October but I moved her right after birth. A few days ago, I noticed a new green saddle with tiny tiny black dots inside. How does she have a new saddle without any male shrimp to impregnate her?
     
  2. jetajockey

    jetajockey Fishlore VIP Member

    The saddle is unfertilized eggs. They aren't fertilized until the shrimp is carrying them on her underside.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    FoulFishes

    FoulFishes Valued Member Member

    Those both sound like really good answers to me, but....whos correct? haha :)

    I will say I have had females before that never had a saddle and some that did so I have no idea why.
     
  4. jetajockey

    jetajockey Fishlore VIP Member

    The saddle is on the back of the shrimp, it looks like a little horse saddle, hence the name. When the shrimp molts a male will engage her and you'll see her berried soon after. Berried is the term for when females carry fertilized eggs on their underside, which look kinda like a berry.
     
  5. psalm18.2

    psalm18.2 Fishlore Legend Member

    Are you sure there aren't any males? I've had tanks I was convinced were empty. Then I add fish and low and behold find shrimp months later.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    FoulFishes

    FoulFishes Valued Member Member

    I'm positive she is the only Shrimp in there because she is the only Shrimp I put into this particular tank ever. I've had her with other males before, but that was long before she had the babies and before I put her into this tank now. I am planning on adding a few more Shrimp cause I really like my Shrimp, but I noticed the saddle a few days ago so I wasn't sure how she got pregnant (if she is), or if this just means that she has the ability to be pregnant again. Cause like I said i've seen females without saddles before, so i'm not sure what the 100% correct answer is.
     
  7. jetajockey

    jetajockey Fishlore VIP Member

     

    This makes it pretty clear, it's really not that complicated of a process.

    The eggs on the back, aka the saddle, are unfertilized eggs. The eggs under the the body, near the legs, are what is referred to as 'berried', fertilized eggs. Not all females will have a saddle, as they are not always producing eggs, and some saddles are hard to see. A female shrimp can be saddled without having a male around, because the eggs are unfertilized. If she has eggs under her body then you have a male in the tank that fertilized them on her last molt.
    from planetinverts [​IMG]

    I'm not sure what all the confusion is about (not sure what post #2 is about either).
     
  8. OP
    OP
    FoulFishes

    FoulFishes Valued Member Member

    To be honest I pretty much understood the process you were explaining, although i'm also glad you shared the planet inverts link. The reason I was so confused was because there was a post earlier that basically said if any shrimp has a saddle they were currently pregnant. That post is no longer there so i'm assuming the OP deleted it. But I was confused because both of the information presented was contradicting each other. I wasn't trying to imply anyone was wrong or right though, I just wasn't sure who had the correct information. Hope that makes sense, jetajockey, its all good now. :)
     
  9. OP
    OP
    FoulFishes

    FoulFishes Valued Member Member

    Update: This particular Shrimp is now berried again and the saddle is gone. I'm still honestly not sure who the father could be, unless she has been having an affair with my Amano Shrimp, haha.

    UPDATE: All the eggs she was carrying are gone now...I'm really not making any of this up, and i'm really not sure what happened here. But its whatever, I suppose the issue has worked itself out now.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012




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