The Planted Tank - 40gal - 36x18x16

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1611mac

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My new tank:
It was such a steal I had to grab it from an online listing. It's a 40gal - 36x18x17. The "breeder" size was an accident, I really wasn't looking for one but It got me to thinking... shallow tank (so to speak) equals more light to the bottom!

So for a planted tank... what are advantages and dis-advantages in dealing with this size tank? Ideas?

I have little to no planted tank experience... doing a lot of reading but I'd most like to hear from the experts! That's You!

Thanks in advance.
 

jay275475

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Its not that much of a shallow tank, it is compared to lets say a 2-3 foot tall tank. With a tank that size you wouldn't need as powerful lights then a deeper tank. I don't really see how this is much of an advantage or disadvantage.

To be clear - Shallow tank doesn't equal more light on the bottom well it does mean more PAR at the bottom with same light if you put it on a shallower tank compared to a deeper tank.
 
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1611mac

1611mac

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I'm speaking relative to 40 gal.... it's "shallow" because its wider than it is deep. 18 front to back, 17 in height. That is a lot of substrate area for 40 gallons is it not? Seems like some nice "layouts" could be done... I could be wrong... like I said, I'm a noob.
 

BDpups

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So for a planted tank... what are advantages and dis-advantages in dealing with this size tank? Ideas?
Deeper tanks are nicer than a narrower tank in general. The footprint will allow for larger decor such as rock work and driftwood in a planted tank. I'm not sure if this is an advantage, just nicer.
I have little to no planted tank experience... doing a lot of reading but I'd most like to hear from the experts! That's You!
I would use a dark substrate with driftwood. Tie some java ferns to the wood. Anubias is another plant that is easy to keep but needs to be attached to wood or rocks. Crypts, wisteria, vals, and swords are also easy to keep beginner plants.

Research, research, research.... Welcome to the forum
 
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1611mac

1611mac

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Nice! May I ask? The moss on the left which is suction cupped on... purpose other than visual? Fry hiding place?
 

BigXor

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Nice! May I ask? The moss on the left which is suction cupped on... purpose other than visual? Fry hiding place?
I just made that with Peacock Moss and I have a bunch of yellow shrimp growing in another tank. I figure by the time the shrimp are mature and breeding (2 months) the moss wall will be grown out. the shrimp can forage and propagate in the moss.

yellowshrimp2.jpg
 
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1611mac

1611mac

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Always something to learn.. (I didn't know shrimp could propagate moss. I'll read....) - Thank you very much. Looking forward to planning my 40g.
 
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