The Natural Aquarium Handbook by Ines Scheurmann

Anders247

Member
Overall, this was a good book, but it had a few problems in areas.

The first chapter was all about tanks- types, sizes, shapes, base and location, repairing aquariums, the drifting into the types of aquariums- community, species, breeding, dutch, and goldfish. This chapter has very good info on each subject.

The second chapter was about water- chemical properties such as dissolved gases, hardness, acidity, nitrogen compounds, salt concentration,and humic acid and peat. Then it went into talking about water conditioners-whether they are necessary. After this the author went into the native habitat of fishes- South America, which has white water, clear water, and black water. White water is from the Amazon, clear water from other rivers, and black water (the most acidic) from the Rio Negro. Central America, which has medium-hard to hard water, neutral to slightly alkaline. North America, which has cooler water, and medium-hard to hard water. Africa- the rift lakes have very hard and alkaline water. Southeast Asia- soft and neutral water, with practically no minerals. Europe- medium-hard to hard water with pH near 7.

The third chapter was about aquarium equipment. Heaters, heater safety, lighting, types of lights, when they are needed, filters, types of filters, filter material, filter maintenance, water circulation and aeration, and useful accessories, like buckets, plant tweezers, algae scrapers, and siphons.

The fourth chapter was about setting up the aquarium. It was about the substrate, types of rocks, wood, and filling the tank.

The fifth chapter was all about plants. They first told some facts, the role of them, their growth, and finally, the various types. Then they went into the needs such as fertilizer, carbon dioxide, light, temperature, and care and propagation. Types of algae and snails were also included in the chapter.

The sixth chapter was about food. Flakes, pellets, live food, frozen food, freeze-dried food, plant food, and how much to feed.

The seventh chapter was about aquarium care. They tell you what fish you should buy, as in how they are behaving, fin condition, spots on skin, etc. They tell you how to transport and acclimate fish. Then they tell the care of the aquarium, which varies according to size, amount of fish, whether it's planted, etc.

The eighth chapter was about fish diseases. They tell you how to prevent diseases, the major symptoms of disease, poisoning of fish, deficiency diseases, bacterial and viral diseases, parasites and fungal infections, and euthanization. They tell you when to check on your fish, and what you should have in your medicine cabinet.

The ninth chapter is about understanding fish. It explains their lifestyle, body shape, fins, skin coloration, how fish breathe, swim bladder, sensory organs, how fish communicate, why fish fight, why some live in schools, breeding fish, and spawning.

The tenth and final chapter is about the types of fish. They have the types, but not species in this chapter. It's just a general overview. They want you to use the inch per gallon rule, but it's outdated. There were some other errors in this section also.

This was a good book, but because of errors, rated 4 of 5.
 

Rivieraneo

Member
Anders, what's the publishing date on this book? I'm guessing late 80s early 90s ?
 
  • Thread Starter

Anders247

Member
2000.
 

Rivieraneo

Member
I have one of this authors older books, though it was published in the late 80's. Seeing that it is a second edition, I think it was updated somewhat from "The New Aquarium Handbook." Great write up though
 
  • Thread Starter

Anders247

Member
Thank you!
 

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