The lowdown on Rummy Nose Tetras

BeardedTetra
Member
I bought an established 125 several weeks ago. It was overstocked with African Cichlids. Two weeks ago I removed the cichlids and rocks and planted the sand substrate that came with the tank. I used a decent number of plants, but most of them are still pretty small.

Here lately, I've been thinking that I need to restock before I lose the cycle. I agreed to let my wife pick the fish for it (we knew we weren't keeping the cichlids).

At first she picked a breeding pair of angelfish, We ordered a proven pair and they arrived DOA. Now she has decided on 25 Panda Cories, 50 Rummy Nose Tetras, and a few juvenile angelfish.

I love the look of the Rummy Nose and the way they school, but most everything that I read about them mentions that they are difficult to keep. One source said that I should expect to lose half of them right off of the bat, and that they will continue to die off slowly until they are all gone.

I'd like to hear from those of you that have kept these fish. Especially those that have had long term success.

Why do so many people have trouble keeping them (what is killing them)?
What they sensitive to?
Could they survive the "aquarium co op quarantine regimen"?
Would a species only tank be more successful than what the wife wants?

I'd like to know as much as I can before I spend a couple hundred bucks. She wants to order them ASAP, so I'm looking for any tips/pointers on how to keep these guys alive long term.

Any and all input is welcomed.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
I should probably mention that the Rummy Noses that I'm considering buying are tank bred.,
 
FinalFins
Member
Hi there,

I can't help much but rummys have the very large reputation of dying out, either off the bat or over time.

They seem to be sensitive to everything, so there isn't much room for error.

Another note is that panda corydoras like cooler water than angels, so maybe re consider there.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
I've heard that from multiple sources. On the other hand there are multiple videos on youtube that claim that they are easy to keep.

I'm a skeptic.

I can also be pretty absent minded, so I'd probably kill them all within a week.
 
bmb0214
Member
Rummynose were my schooling pick until I saw all the warnings. Now I’m nervous as well. Plus it seems to be hard to find many in stock.
 
Flyfisha
Member
Here’s my take on why rummy nose tetras are not easy to keep. They swim all day in a constant motion unlike a lot of other tetras that stop start swim. My own personal opinion is I will not get them again until I have a big tank. Even a 4 foot 55 gallon / 1200mm 200 litre tank was not big enough in my opinion.

Bearededtetra a 125 gallon ( I presume ) may be big enough to offer a beautiful home for this wonderful fish. Sadly sites like Aqadvisor will let anyone put them in much smaller tanks.

They are a fish sold by the hundreds in chain stores.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
Yes. It's a 6 ft 125 gallon.

I don't understand the rationale behind your theory? I mean they are what? 2 in? A 4 ft tank is 24 times their body length.
 
Flyfisha
Member
I had a school of 18 odd rummy nose tetras they swim together in a true school. Fantastic to look at. However in the 4 foot no sooner had they started swimming in one direction they had to turn and swim the other way. I can only imagine what is going on with the fish at the tail of the school? The last fish in the school swims 3 feet at most back and forth back and forth following the leaders that are swimming 4 feet.
I had them in 2 foot tanks and saw little of this schooling behaviour.

I suggest they are not suitable for aquariums? There I said it.

An example of a good stop start swimmer is ember tetras - black neons etc. They swim this direction then that ,stop start stop start .
However you don’t see the schooling behaviour that you see is shoaling behaviour.
 
Redshark1
Member
I've found them very sensitive to ammonia and to acclimatising to a new tank.

As with Neon Tetra, once aclimatised and fattened up they are a first class fish to keep.

I'd recommend keeping just the one Angel. Its a big characterful interesting fish that responds to its owner and wants to be the boss of its aquarium. A fish worth designing the aquarium around.

A pair will attempt to breed, take over the tank and may create problems with the other fish as well as fall out with each other outside the breeding period. With a single you get none of the headaches.
 
A201
Member
I kept Rummynose, long term, many years ago in a 65 gal. tank. In those days Rummies weren't all that common & most were sold as adults.
I believe my Rummies were wild caught. They were all solidly built, rounded bellies & a little over an inch long when purchased.
The Rummies I see sold today are tiny, pale juveniles. Not very appealing.
There are so many options regarding schooling fish suitable for a 125 gal.
It will take a big finacial investment just to stock enough Rummynose tetras to be noticeable in a big tank.
Before ordering Rummies, look at Columbian, Buenos Aires, Bleeding Heart & Congo Tetras, fancy species of Silver Dollars, Rainbow fish, Filament or Denison Barbs.
 
DoubleDutch
Member
I'd more worry about the Panda Corys to be honest. Healthwise and tempwise.
 
deadhead
Member
I keep rummeynose tetras with no problem in a planted 55 gallon. Ever since I started using RO/DI water I started having much better success with everything I keep. I agree with DoubleDutch. Corys aren't hard once you've had them awhile but they seem to have a horrible time adjusting to a new aquarium when you bring them home. My rummeynose don't seem to be any harder to keep than any of my other tetras.

I don't get why you would want so many of 2 types of fish? you could go with 2 or 3 types of corydoras with the number you're using and a bunch of different schools of tetra. I notice it's the rummeynose that get the whole schooling thing going from one side of the tank to the other but all my tetras seem to join in once it gets going.
Ember tetras, gold tetras, cardinal tetras, you name it they all jump in. I've even seen a marble hatchetfish or 2 join in which is pretty funny to see.

I would be cautious getting them first as this is a new set up but once the tank is established I wouldn't be concerned about keeping rummynose tetras alive.

One cool thing about rummynose is they tell a lot about your water quality. The better the water is, The bigger and brighter their red spot gets. They always look great after a water change.
 
deadhead
Member
Flyfisha said:
I had a school of 18 odd rummy nose tetras they swim together in a true school. Fantastic to look at. However in the 4 foot no sooner had they started swimming in one direction they had to turn and swim the other way. I can only imagine what is going on with the fish at the tail of the school? The last fish in the school swims 3 feet at most back and forth back and forth following the leaders that are swimming 4 feet.
I had them in 2 foot tanks and saw little of this schooling behaviour.

I suggest they are not suitable for aquariums? There I said it.

An example of a good stop start swimmer is ember tetras - black neons etc. They swim this direction then that ,stop start stop start .
However you don’t see the schooling behaviour that you see is shoaling behaviour.
Perhaps they like turning around and going the other way. Otherwise, why would they do it?
 
FinalFins
Member
deadhead said:
Perhaps they like turning around and going the other way. Otherwise, why would they do it?
Because it's the only thing they can do...?
 
StarGirl
Member
I never have had luck with Rummies. I would buy 6 and get 1. buy 6 more now 2. With the drop of a hat they would just die for no reason. I just stopped getting them because they do not guarantee them and I was getting sick of spending 30 some dollars for 1 fish. Even though I LOVE them....
 
FishBoy101
Member
Rummies seem to die quite randomly. I have never kept them but had considered keeping, maybe switch them out with a different tetra?
 
deadhead
Member
FinalFins said:
Because it's the only thing they can do...?
I was at my LFS several months back and they had around 15 of those beautiful spotted stingrays. I started talking to the guy who runs the shop about how big they get, how long they live, how hard they are to take care of. I wondered how many people in my area even keep them. It turned into a debate on whether or not they should be held for anyone to come buy even if they don't know what they're doing. In my opinion, they should only be a special order made by an advanced aquarist who really knows what they're doing.

Now we're going to debate whether or not rummynose tetras are suitable for this hobby?

I've ruled out a lot of fish as being to large for an aquarium but I never thought the discussion would turn to rummynose tetras.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
This thread is getting good! From husbandry to behavior to ethics, "what a long strange trip it's been."

I've just about talked myself out of them b/c I basically I've spent way too much time on the hobby for a good while, and now I want to be lazy for a while and just have two or three easily maintained 75+ gallon tanks.

Maybe 100 neons and a couple of bristlenose plecos in the 125?
 
StarGirl
Member
Cardinals and plecs!
 
FinalFins
Member
Oooh, I'm a fan of the fancy monster plecos An 8 inch pleco would look fantastic. Honeycomb pleco?
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
I found someone local that breeds Blue eyed Lemon Bristlenose Plecos. I think they look pretty cool and I'm always in favor of supporting local hobbyists. I know that DoubleDutch knows what he is talking about and after his comment, I think I'm just going to do the Plecos. (if they arent incompatible somehow).

When i got back into the hobby 'this time', I wanted Neon Tetras. At that time I was still skeptical about buying fish online, so my only source was the big box stores. None that I bought ever really looked good, but I was determined to try. I couldn't manage to keep them alive for long. Unless they are like the Rummy Nose (delicate/sensitive from every source), I think I'd like to give them another try.
 
deadhead
Member
Since it's a 125 I'd turn it into a reef. How come you got rid of the cichlids?
 
jake37
Member
This is highly dependent on the pair - well the first part about breeding is true. I had to go through several sets of juvi angels to get a pair that works well. Actually i have a harem of sort (m/f/f); that mostly works. When they breed they only require the fishes to stay 4 to 6 inches away ('cept for the third angel - she gotta stay 2 feet away). So far it is working well - they can raise the eggs to wrigglers in the tank - no one gets too upset (i have 5 clown loaches; 8 yoyo loaches; 12 kuhli loaches and around 22 cardinal tetras along with a few odds and end - 2 pleco sae ....). yea the angels poke at the loaches if they swim too close but it mostly works.
--
Having said that the first ones that paired did in fact try to claim 3 1/2 feet of a four foot tank and that was problematic.

Redshark1 said:
A pair will attempt to breed, take over the tank and may create problems with the other fish as well as fall out with each other outside the breeding period. With a single you get none of the headaches.
 
jake37
Member
If you get pleco there are nicer pleco than bn - the flash pleco is really nice for example and is mostly a wood and algae eater. Lemon are ok i guess and some people like super red but the flash is pretty nice - if you look in the picture pleco thread you can see lots of different types of plecos - there are 100's (400?). Another (I haven't owned) that is interesting is blue phantom (if you don't esp want algae eater there are even more to consider).
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
I work 7 on 7 off and was up to 9 tanks. Routine maintenance started feeling more like work than a hobby.

My tap water is soft, so I'm going back to soft water stock.
 
EgorAnonymous
Member
I wonder if maybe it is just one of the three species of Rummy-nose tetra that is weaker. Also, since there are three, wouldn't it make sense to use: Rummynose Tetra, Rummy-nose Tetra and Rummy Nose Tetra to help differentiate the three?
 
DoubleDutch
Member
BeardedTetra said:
I found someone local that breeds Blue eyed Lemon Bristlenose Plecos. I think they look pretty cool and I'm always in favor of supporting local hobbyists. I know that DoubleDutch knows what he is talking about and after his comment, I think I'm just going to do the Plecos. (if they arent incompatible somehow).

When i got back into the hobby 'this time', I wanted Neon Tetras. At that time I was still skeptical about buying fish online, so my only source was the big box stores. None that I bought ever really looked good, but I was determined to try. I couldn't manage to keep them alive for long. Unless they are like the Rummy Nose (delicate/sensitive from every source), I think I'd like to give them another try.
I'd definitely get some Corys as well but not Pandas. The blue eyed lemon BN's are great fish to but incomparrable to Corys.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
What are your suggestions for healthy hardy Corys?

After reading this thread, she's decided against Rummy Nose. I was also unable to sell her on the neons. I've talked her into stocking lightly and planting heavily. Juvenile Angelfish and more plants are on the way.

Here's a recent pic of the tank. Its got a lot of filling in to do. I'm going to lose the floating plants while the fish are in quarantine so that everything will get more light and hopefully have some good growth.


20200708_194245.jpg
 
jake37
Member
I like sterbai cory myself; also salt and pepper or pygmy.
 
  • Thread Starter
BeardedTetra
Member
We both really like pygmies, but believe that the Angels would eventually eat them.
 
deadhead
Member
I'd be sure to get one that's easy to find. I had a group of Melini
Corys that has sadly dwindled down to one. He's been in my tank for 4 years now and sits with my other corys. I've been asking my LFS for them for over 6 months now and I'm still waiting to get this poor guy some Melini friends. Sterbai and Julii corys are real nice and pretty easy to find.
 

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