Terrible present

Gladys

Member
I don't know why, but my dad bought a dozen of guppies as a present and I was terribly upsetted by this. There's no time for me to cycle a new tank, so I have to add them to an established tank, which, made my tank overcrowded.
The most upsetting part is 5 of them died in four day, one by one. I did a water test and it's perfect. I was very, very concerned about it since I'm afraid that it might be some sort of disease that will make my whole tank die since water test couldn't test if there's a sickness/disease inside. Is it just purely because the guppies couldn't accept such changes in the environment or is it my tank's problem? I suspect there's a possibility that the first guppy that died might have some sort of disease and it spread to others. My old fishes are still doing fine, none of them have problems until now. What should I do now???
 

kallililly1973

Member
Tell him you want to return them cause it’s overcrowding your tank
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
kallililly1973 said:
Tell him you want to return them cause it’s overcrowding your tank
It can't be returned. There's no refund/return after buying them. Moreover, I'm pretty sure they will continue dying in the shop's tank.
 

Sorg67

Member
You could set up a new tank and do a fish-in cycle.
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
Sorg67 said:
You could set up a new tank and do a fish-in cycle.
Fish-in cycle's risk is too high. They died even when I added them to an established, cycled tank, not to mention a fish-in cycle. The established tank is slightly overcrowded, but I had always keep an eye on the parameters and it's fine. Ammonia and nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm. There's a new tank on the way but it won't arrive so fast.
 

24Bryce

Member
Gladys said:
Fish-in cycle's risk is too high. They died even when I added them to an established, cycled tank, not to mention a fish-in cycle. The established tank is slightly overcrowded, but I had always keep an eye on the parameters and it's fine. Ammonia and nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm. There's a new tank on the way but it won't arrive so fast.
id do lots of water changes to make sure the Ammonia/nitrate/nitrite doesn't stay high
 

mattgirl

Member
Gladys said:
Fish-in cycle's risk is too high. They died even when I added them to an established, cycled tank, not to mention a fish-in cycle. The established tank is slightly overcrowded, but I had always keep an eye on the parameters and it's fine. Ammonia and nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm. There's a new tank on the way but it won't arrive so fast.
Actually a fish in cycle isn't as bad as over crowding your main tank. If your main tank has been cycled for a while you can transfer some of its media and maybe even some of its gravel over to a new tank and jump start the cycle in the new tank.
 

PascalKrypt

Member
People who give pets (whether fish or otherwise) as presents without consulting the receiver of said gift first... sigh. I get they are trying to be nice but...

Sorry about the mess Though I know it probably won't make you feel better, none of it is due to your poor judgment. Don't feel to guilty about giving them away or housing them (temporarily) in less than ideal circumstances, I would just give precedent to the health and wellbeing of my established, precious fish in this scenario.
 

SM1199

Member
If I were you, I'd feel better putting the new guppies in a different tank for the sake of quarantine (a little late for that but still worth it) to keep your old fish healthy. It outweighs the risk of a fish-in cycle in my mind. I'd rather have my older fish in the established tank stay healthy and lose a few guppies I didn't expect to own than wipe out all my old fish and potentially all the guppies too.
 

jpm995

Member
It's really too late to take action to save the fish. Was there any indication of ich or and disease on the fish? The worse part is if they survive and their male and female the'll breed like rabbits.
 

BlackSkirtTetra

Member
As said before it is best to prize the health of the established fish, before that of the new arrivals. The guppies may have been previously diseased. I’d set up another tank just to QT them and make sure the rest of your stick doesn’t get infected.
 

saltwater60

Member
Gladys said:
Fish-in cycle's risk is too high. They died even when I added them to an established, cycled tank, not to mention a fish-in cycle. The established tank is slightly overcrowded, but I had always keep an eye on the parameters and it's fine. Ammonia and nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm. There's a new tank on the way but it won't arrive so fast.
Why are people so afraid of fish in cycles? I’ve been doing it that way for years and never lost a fish due to it. Do it right and do it slowly and you’ll be fine.
I would not have risked placing them in my tank. What’s worse guppies dying that sound like they could be sick or in poor health or adding 12 fish to an already overcrowded tank. Adding 12 fish to a max capacity tank is a lot of extra bioload. I’d set up another tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
jpm995 said:
It's really too late to take action to save the fish. Was there any indication of ich or and disease on the fish? The worse part is if they survive and their male and female the'll breed like rabbits.
There's no female, all male. There's no indication, they died unexpectedly. They're looking fine swimming around and the next hour they're dead. For now, besides quarantine, are there any things I can do to prevent further progress of this dying? Like a few drops of malachite green or aquarium salt?
 

kallililly1973

Member
Sorry for all the losses. What size tank did you add them to that made it so overcrowded? What was in the tank before the guppies were added?
 

Momgoose56

Member
Gladys said:
There's no female, all male. There's no indication, they died unexpectedly. They're looking fine swimming around and the next hour they're dead. For now, besides quarantine, are there any things I can do to prevent further progress of this dying? Like a few drops of malachite green or aquarium salt?
If there's no sign of disease, why treat for a disease. Taking aspirin for a headache when you don't have a headache is non-productive. They may just have died because they came from a tank with drastically different water parameters.
What size tank do you have that 7 male guppys are overcrowding it? What other fish do you have in there?
Edit: Sorry, I see kallililly1973 just asked this same question-
 

tekjunkie28

Member
I’ve never had good luck with guppies. In fact I think fish have gotten weaker overall. Cichlids have been very good to me but even better was marine fish and corals. Guppies and Glofish are not very good for me. But when the moons align and I have guppies they make babies like a fish factory.
 

DuaneV

Member
If theyre dying left and right, somethings wrong. Either the temp, their tankmates, etc. Putting them in a new tank of their own will be MUCH better than where theyre living now as theyre already dying. No need to throw chemicals or salt in the tank if you don't know what you're treating them for.

If they were put into a community tank you already had running, Id get them out of there NOW just in case they are diseased.

Also, Guppies are cheap. Return them and lose the few dollars they cost, continuing killing them (which is worse) or set up a new tank and try from scratch.
 

hahafish

Member
Gladys said:
I don't know why, but my dad bought a dozen of guppies as a present and I was terribly upsetted by this. There's no time for me to cycle a new tank, so I have to add them to an established tank, which, made my tank overcrowded.
The most upsetting part is 5 of them died in four day, one by one. I did a water test and it's perfect. I was very, very concerned about it since I'm afraid that it might be some sort of disease that will make my whole tank die since water test couldn't test if there's a sickness/disease inside. Is it just purely because the guppies couldn't accept such changes in the environment or is it my tank's problem? I suspect there's a possibility that the first guppy that died might have some sort of disease and it spread to others. My old fishes are still doing fine, none of them have problems until now. What should I do now???
If so many died in such a short period, something contagious is going on probably I would guess?
 

Gone

Member
SM1199 said:
If I were you, I'd feel better putting the new guppies in a different tank for the sake of quarantine (a little late for that but still worth it) to keep your old fish healthy. It outweighs the risk of a fish-in cycle in my mind. I'd rather have my older fish in the established tank stay healthy and lose a few guppies I didn't expect to own than wipe out all my old fish and potentially all the guppies too.
There's nothing wrong with a fish-in cycle as long as you test every day and do water changes to keep combined ammonia and nitrites at 1 ppm or below.
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
DuaneV said:
If theyre dying left and right, somethings wrong. Either the temp, their tankmates, etc. Putting them in a new tank of their own will be MUCH better than where theyre living now as theyre already dying. No need to throw chemicals or salt in the tank if you don't know what you're treating them for.

If they were put into a community tank you already had running, Id get them out of there NOW just in case they are diseased.

Also, Guppies are cheap. Return them and lose the few dollars they cost, continuing killing them (which is worse) or set up a new tank and try from scratch.
I've answered it up there:
1. The shop won't accept it even if I want no money back
2. They will eventually continue dying in the shop's environment

For now I've immediately removed them from the tank and put them in the biggest plastic container I've got. The established tank got guppies inside before the new arrived. Unfortunately, when my dad bought those new guppies, I was rescaping my tank so I moved the old guppies to a temporary 3 gallon container.
I suspect they died from dropsy. The first guppy that died has a very bloated stomach, and I thought that was caused by swim bladder disorder (he swimmed upside down due to changes of environment). There's one that died with a deflated stomach, when I google all came out is sunken/bloated/swelled stomach until I clicked into dropsy and found dropsy could also cause a deflated stomach.
 

jpm995

Member
One thing that might be helpful would be water parameters, you said their perfect but what are they? A big difference in ph between the stores tanks and yours could be the issue. Are the same batch of guppies still ok in the stores tank?
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
I've already list the parameter numbers are on the previous page. Ammonia, nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm, pH at 7. I'm not quite sure what you meant by your 2nd question. The first time I went there to buy guppies, the guppies are healthy until now, they're doing fine. If you're asking the guppies in the store, I'm not really sure as I've not been there since the first time I went there which was months ago. Besides I'm not there when the fishes were bought as a present, I don't know what the original tank looks like.
 

BettaNgold

Member
Why can’t you just take some of the existing filter media from the main tank and some gravel. Place that
In a quarantine tank and you should have a new cycle in a couple of days. Use Prime until then. Get them a heater and filter.
 

CHJ

Member
In cases like this you just call emergency water change.
Take water out of established tanks and dump it in a big plastic tub or pail. Instant tank. as these are guppies I do not even know if you need to ad a foam filter if you have a big tub (I would just in case).
 

BettaNgold

Member
CHJ said:
In cases like this you just call emergency water change.
Take water out of established tanks and dump it in a big plastic tub or pail. Instant tank. as these are guppies I do not even know if you need to ad a foam filter if you have a big tub (I would just in case).
That’ll start the tank with safe water but won’t start a cycle. The Beneficial bacteria must cling to something and doesn’t live in the water column. It needs to already be colonizing on something.
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
I don't need an heater, it's always hot in my country. I did use the gravel from the established tank. The new fishes are quarantined 2 days ago, all I can do was put them in a small container with the original water they're living in and acclimate them slowly. Currently I don't have any extra filter and is waiting for it to arrive unless I use the one from my betta tank.
 

jpm995

Member
Gladys said:
I've already list the parameter numbers are on the previous page. Ammonia, nitrite at 0, nitrate at 10ppm, pH at 7. I'm not quite sure what you meant by your 2nd question. The first time I went there to buy guppies, the guppies are healthy until now, they're doing fine. If you're asking the guppies in the store, I'm not really sure as I've not been there since the first time I went there which was months ago. Besides I'm not there when the fishes were bought as a present, I don't know what the original tank looks like.
Sorry I guess I missed where you listed paramerers. My other point was if you bought guppies from a stores tank and they died go back to the store and see if the others are ok. If the store has healthy guppies left from the batch they sold you it would appear the guppies were healthy when you bought them.To me moving guppies to a new tank to prevent disease is already too late. I would just leave them where they are, why add more stress? Good luck, in most cases without doing an autopsy its impossible to determine why a fish died, we just take educated guesses. We can provide a healthy stress free enviornment the fish have to do the rest. Their subjuct to many possible life threating issues before making it to our tanks, its not suprising many die when we get them.
 

CHJ

Member
BettaNgold said:
That’ll start the tank with safe water but won’t start a cycle. The Beneficial bacteria must cling to something and doesn’t live in the water column. It needs to already be colonizing on something.
True.
I like to keep emergency foams in tanks but still have many dry laying about.
I also like to have giant java moss mops that I can pitch into a bin/tank. I'm currently frying ~2 lbs in Nibbles's tank (moss doesn't like 80f) and torturing ~2lb in my haplo bin (basement with no added light), today one of my open tanks gets light after 2 weeks (hair algae) its ~1lb is fine.
However without that solution they can dump live tank water to a bin and toss a foam in as a colonization site.
Live water is the way to a fast cycle. Add super clean sand and ++. Those bacteria will stick to any surface as fast as they can.
 

BettaNgold

Member
CHJ said:
True.
I like to keep emergency foams in tanks but still have many dry laying about.
I also like to have giant java moss mops that I can pitch into a bin/tank. I'm currently frying ~2 lbs in Nibbles's tank (moss doesn't like 80f) and torturing ~2lb in my haplo bin (basement with no added light), today one of my open tanks gets light after 2 weeks (hair algae) its ~1lb is fine.
However without that solution they can dump live tank water to a bin and toss a foam in as a colonization site.
Live water is the way to a fast cycle. Add super clean sand and ++. Those bacteria will stick to any surface as fast as they can.
Don’t you think it’s so much easier just to throw some cycled media with established bacteria already colonized into the filter? Then bam, you’re done. I normally have a cycled tank in a few hours.
 

CHJ

Member
BettaNgold said:
Don’t you think it’s so much easier just to throw some cycled media with established bacteria already colonized into the filter? Then bam, you’re done. I normally have a cycled tank in a few hours.
Ideally yes.
I also like having backup and backup for the backup.
For example, my latest tower was going to be hot backup but that additional 3-400GPH started beating up my rainbows. So it is now cold backup.
 
  • Thread Starter

Gladys

Member
Thanks for all the replies!
I've did all I can. If they're fine for another week, does it mean I can add them back into the established tank where all my old fishes are? Fortunately my old guppies are fine.
 

BettaNgold

Member
I think 7 - 10 days would be safe!
 

gbcampos

Member
Did the surviving guppies make it, did you lose any of your original fish?
 

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