Help Tank Temperatures & Fishless Cycling

npandav011

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Hi,

(NOTE: Questions might be very "noob like")

I recently got a 10 gallon tank and I am in the process of the fishless cycle.

I bought a stick on thermometer from my LFS, but I am wondering how accurate it is vs a thermometer that is in the actual water. If you have any info on this topic feel free to post it.

My other question is regarding the fishless cycle. On average how long does it take for the ammonia to drop to 0. It has been 6 days since I added it to get the level to 5-6 ppm, but it is still 4 ppm. Am I doing something wrong?
 

jetajockey

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stick on thermometers can be unreliable, and the ones ive had in the past aren't very accurate because each color covers 2 degrees.

Cycling takes several weeks, sometimes 6-8 weeks or more, so it will likely be several weeks before you start seeing the ammonia level drop in large amounts.
 

UNTAMEDlore

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hi there, stick on thermometers are pretty cheap and nasty they are probally the worst thing to use for an accurate reading of temp, none the less they work well enough. A glass thermometer is a better reading and if you wanna be real accurate you cant go past a good digital.

you are probally a week if not more from a finished cycle have you had a algee bloom yet? are you using a filter?
 

UNTAMEDlore

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You will know when u get an algee bloom as the water will become very cloudy very cloudy indeed, it will clear as the tank cycles. If you have had an algee bloom your about half way through your cycle. In saying that not all tank cycles have a bloom but its pretty common.. hope this helps

https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm

also check out this link
 

pepetj

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Do you think I should upgrade filters to the Top Fin 20?
That depends what fish you are planning to keep. As a general guideline the more filtration the better but if you are keeping some stagnant/low flow water fish then I would keep it to the minimum yet safe filter.

Pepetj
Santo Domingo
 

jdhef

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You will know when u get an algee bloom as the water will become very cloudy very cloudy indeed, it will clear as the tank cycles. If you have had an algee bloom your about half way through your cycle. In saying that not all tank cycles have a bloom but its pretty common.. hope this helps

https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm

also check out this link
Actually the white cloudy water you get during cycling is a bacteria bloom. But as mentioned it will go away on it's own after a few days.

Green cloudy water is an algae bloom. Generally an algae bloom will not go away on it's own. The most common causes of algae blooms are over feeding, direct sunlight hitting the tank, having the light on for too many hours per day or high nitrates.
 

UNTAMEDlore

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Actually the white cloudy water you get during cycling is a bacteria bloom. But as mentioned it will go away on it's own after a few days.

Green cloudy water is an algae bloom. Generally an algae bloom will not go away on it's own. The most common causes of algae blooms are over feeding, direct sunlight hitting the tank, having the light on for too many hours per day or high nitrates.
Sorry my bad im not up with all the lingo i new what i ment just gave it the wrong name lol ill try better in da future heheh im
 

funkman262

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Also, when do I start testing for nitrites and nitrates?
Your nitrate tests won't be very accurate until there are no nitrites in the water because it tests for nitrite+nitrate. It converts the nitrate to nitrite and then measures the amount of nitrite. I don't know how the tests finalize the results, in other words if it gives you mg/L as nitrite or nitrate-N (nitrate but as mg/L nitrogen). If it gives you the latter, then I'd imagine you could determine how much nitrate you have by subtracting your nitrite results from the nitrate results. If not, you'd have to do additional calculations to determine how much nitrate is actually there.
 

carolo43

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Fishless cycling is the way to go and I commend you on trying to keep your fish safe from going thru a cycle. The point in adding ammonia to 4-5 is so you are able to stock a pretty big bio-load of fish all at once without the cycle going thru a set-back. But, you have a small tank. You will never stock enough in that small tank to warrant a huge bio-load that bringing ammonia to 4-5 will support. Plus, you also have a small filter with not as much growing room for bacteria as you would for a large tank.

You only need to grow enough bacteria to support how much stock will be in your tank. I would not be using that much ammonia in your tank size. If you kept your ammonia level to one, you are still cycling and enough bacteria for your tank size.

4-5 is great in larger tank but not necessary in those small ones.
 
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