Tank Temp

FancyPantsy

Hi boys and girls, hope you're all well.

How can I cool down my tank?

I usually have it at 22 degrees, but where we've actually had a couple of days of summer in the UK I've come home from work to the tank being 24.5! (I've got a fluval E heater as my tank was about 10 degrees colder than the shop tank when I was setting up)

The little puddings seem fine, not acting any differently, am I worrying unnecessarily?
 

ChrissFishes01

Goldfish are pretty adaptable, so I wouldn't worry. I've seen people keep goldfish in the upper 70's (mid 20's C) without any issues, especially outside.
 
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Sc0rPs

Well two ways you can help keep it cool, the first is a small water change with cold water. Make sure the fish are not swimming about where you pour... the temp change can shock. The other is one of those USB clip of fans (not the tiny ones) you can clip to the top and have it blow over the water which will help keep the temp down.

24.5 is the the top of the recommended comfort zone, but they can adapt to even higher provided it is subtle slow change... so nothing to be overly concerned. The other side is the temp increase does also mean they could spawn. ;)
 
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jtjgg

nothing to worry about, goldfish do fine up to 30-35'C

this wasn't like you were doing a water change and the temp jumped up within a few seconds. this happened over a period of several hours.

many goldfish are bred and raised in outdoor ponds in Tropical regions, like Thailand, Philippines, Florida, Brazil, etc.
 
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FancyPantsy

Thank you all, definitely put my mind at rest!
 
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Flyfisha

The goldfish in Australia are raised in Thailand. Our summer is hot ( real hot) . While our fish are accustomed to 30 degree centigrade temperatures yours are more used to UK temperatures.
They should be ok. The change is slow . Adding an air stone is standard practice for our summer time as high temperatures lower the amount of oxygen available.
7D1E422A-81DF-49BA-BD90-CD18B2036D07.jpeg
 
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TheeLadyG

If it makes you feel better my tank is regularly at 23-26 (75-80f). I don't have any kind of heater, my home is just really warm. I did a water change just yesterday and read the temp at 25. As Flyfisha said, higher temps mean that water lets go of oxygen faster, so keeping the surface agitated is important. All of your oxygen exchange happens at the surface, the more surface area you have (with waves, bubbles or other disturbance) the more oxygen exchange! I have two sources of bubbles in my tank, an air-driven sponge filter and an airstone bar buried in the sand.

We had a terrible temp spike here a couple of summers ago and my A/C was broken. I kept frozen bottles of water at the ready with the idea I would float one on top of the tank if it got over 30 (85f). (also to put on the floor for my rabbits). I ran a fan across the top of the water and evaporative cooling helped keep the temp around 26.
 
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mimo91088

I live in the new England area of US. As you can imagine from the name, we have a pretty similar climate. I don't run heaters in the winter or fans in the summer. Water temps on extreme days reach 64 low or 80 high. I feel these seasonal changes are beneficial.
 
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FancyPantsy

Definitely gonna pop some bottles in the freezer as a back up, like that idea. Have popped a little USB air stone in and after hiding from it the little puddings have really perked up (more than normal). Temp has settled down again now, unless those three days were our whole summer (possible) I feel less panicked about the temp
Also hopefully almost doubling the tank space this coming week so more room for better bubbles and more surface area too
 
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