Tank Parameter Problems

LionessModeling

New Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Points
8
I have had the tank running for over a year now.
Done partial water changes weekly.

The no3 and kh levels are high
The ph, gh, no2, and ammonia level are normal.
I have 2 filters running in the tank and 2 heaters running in it and 1 bubbler and drift wood.
The tank is a 30gal long.

The tank has 2 live plants, 2 mollies, 3 male guppies, 2 gouramis, 1 albino pleco, and 3 mystery snails.
Nothing I do to help clear up the water doesn't work it's got a green/yellow tinge to it.

I will include a photo of the products I use to aid in the upkeep of the tank.
3f48ece4f221b33117c9ed7125061a98.jpg




I have had the tank running for over a year now.
Done partial water changes weekly.

The no3 and kh levels are high
The ph, gh, no2, and ammonia level are normal.
I have 2 filters running in the tank and 2 heaters running in it and 1 bubbler and drift wood.
The tank is a 30gal long.

The tank has 2 live plants, 2 mollies, 3 male guppies, 2 gouramis, 1 albino pleco, and 3 mystery snails.
Nothing I do to help clear up the water doesn't work it's got a green/yellow tinge to it.

I will include a photo of the products I use to aid in the upkeep of the tank.
3f48ece4f221b33117c9ed7125061a98.jpg
The tank
31f95ab901ca214bf36eaa7f252fe803.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DaleM

Well Known Member
Messages
808
Reaction score
390
Points
78
Experience
Just started
If nitrate levels are high, it means your weekly water changes are not enough and may have to be increased to deal with the bioload and subsequent waste of your tank
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

LionessModeling

New Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Points
8
If nitrate levels are high, it means your weekly water changes are not enough and may have to be increased to deal with the bioload and subsequent waste of your tank
On the directions for the testing kit it says water changes don't help lower nitrate levels because they are mineral build up from evaporation and waste build up from food, fish poop, and any dead plants and only a special chemical can fix it which I've been using.

Nitrite levels can be lowered by water changes but not nitrate levels
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DaleM

Well Known Member
Messages
808
Reaction score
390
Points
78
Experience
Just started
On the directions for the testing kit it says water changes don't help lower nitrate levels because they are mineral build up from evaporation and waste build up from food, fish poop, and any dead plants and only a special chemical can fix it which I've been using.

Nitrite levels can be lowered by water changes but not nitrate levels
Not sure what testing kit you use, but nitrate levels can definitely be dropped by water changes - that's the whole point of doing water changes in the first place. Quite baffled that a testing kit would say that
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

LionessModeling

New Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Points
8
Not sure what testing kit you use, but nitrate levels can definitely be dropped by water changes - that's the whole point of doing water changes in the first place. Quite baffled that a testing kit would say that
I use the API test strips 5 in 1 and it's directions say nitrates can't be lowered by water changes so idk either.

See
8e25e0d144c0f8cab4acdeefcbe34075.jpg
 

DaleM

Well Known Member
Messages
808
Reaction score
390
Points
78
Experience
Just started
I use the API test strips 5 in 1 and it's directions say nitrates can't be lowered by water changes so idk either.

See
View attachment 358308
That's only if your tap water contains high nitrates, in which case water changes wouldn't help much because you'd just be adding extra nitrates in from your tap water. Test strips aren't very accurate either. I'd recommend API Freshwater Master test kit. Test your tap water and see how much, if any, ammonia or nitrates it has. But frequent water changes are the ONLY way to get nitrates down. Having some live plants will help a bit, but not enough to not need at least one weekly water change.

If your nitrate levels are high, check your tap water and then either increase the % of water you change each week or increase the number of water changes per week. If water changes didn't remove nitrate none of us would bother with water changes
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7

LionessModeling

New Member
Messages
46
Reaction score
2
Points
8
That's only if your tap water contains high nitrates, in which case water changes wouldn't help much because you'd just be adding extra nitrates in from your tap water. Test strips aren't very accurate either. I'd recommend API Freshwater Master test kit. Test your tap water and see how much, if any, ammonia or nitrates it has. But frequent water changes are the ONLY way to get nitrates down. Having some live plants will help a bit, but not enough to not need at least one weekly water change.

If your nitrate levels are high, check your tap water and then either increase the % of water you change each week or increase the number of water changes per week. If water changes didn't remove nitrate none of us would bother with water changes
Okay I will go but a master test kit after the test strips are gone and I will do partial water changes twice a week until I get this figured out and also will get an API tap filter to be safe lol

Thank you so much for your help in figuring this out.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DaleM

Well Known Member
Messages
808
Reaction score
390
Points
78
Experience
Just started
Thank you so much for your help in figuring this out.
I wouldn't worry too much about the tap filter until you establish whether or not your tap water has an ammonia and/or nitrates in it. If is doesn't, then the filter would be a waste of money.

Test your tap water first and increase the water changes in the mean time and you should be on the right track
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom