Tank leveling question

StarGirl

I want to put a Fluval Flex 9g on my counter top. It is kind of warped and not level. Will a thick piece of rubber mat be sufficient or should I use a piece of wood? It kind of dips down across the middle of the counter.
 

Patman0519

I want to put a Fluval Flex 9g on my counter top. It is kind of warped and not level. Will a thick piece of rubber mat be sufficient or should I use a piece of wood? It kind of dips down across the middle of the counter.
Yoga mat????
9 gallons loaded is gonna weigh around what?...45 59 lbs maybe??? You could possibly get away with using a thick piece of foam padding also to span the whole bottom of the tank.
 
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StarGirl

Thats what I was thinking but I didnt know if it would still flex at all.
 
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Jennmariexoxo

Can you use shims? I use them to level all sorts of things just shove them in until the tank is level and snap off the remainder.
 
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StarGirl

Can you use shims? I use them to level all sorts of things just shove them in until the tank is level and snap off the remainder.
It would be really hard because it is a counter and not on the floor. I may end up with a piece of plywood.
 
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dwc13

Not sure how warped your counter surface is. If you place a 2' level across the counter top (spanning areas that are warped), can you see light (gaps) between the bottom of the level and the countertop? Note that you might want to check several slightly different places in the area you're considering placing the tank. Also slowly pull the level towards to while checking for gaps. If it's hard to determine, shine a small flashlight from behind the level. If you can see light (gaps), a rubber mat alone might *not* provide the equalized support for all areas of the bottom surface of the tank that you want to have.

If there is a gap, you should consider a high quality pre-sanded plywood base (slightly larger than the aquarium) and then place the mat that came with the aquarium on top. Depending upon your climate / house conditions, you might first seal the plywood base to help prevent it from absorbing moisture. I can understand you might not be interested in permanently affixing (i.e., gluing) a piece of plywood to the countertop. Still, you might consider testing out the setup after filling with water & gravel (but before you add fish & plants) to see if it moves too easily. Pre-sanded wood can be surprisingly agile on smooth surfaces. The weight of the stocked aquarium should help prevent such an occurrence, but better safe than sorry, right?

The Fluval Flex 9 is a good-looking aquarium. If it was my decision, I would probably be inclined to err on the side of caution and use a combination high quality pre-sanded plywood & mat base (or find a different, suitable location).
 
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StarGirl

Not sure how warped your counter surface is. If you place a 2' level across the counter top (spanning areas that are warped), can you see light (gaps) between the bottom of the level and the countertop? Note that you might want to check several slightly different places in the area you're considering placing the tank. Also slowly pull the level towards to while checking for gaps. If it's hard to determine, shine a small flashlight from behind the level. If you can see light (gaps), a rubber mat alone might *not* provide the equalized support for all areas of the bottom surface of the tank that you want to have.

If there is a gap, you should consider a high quality pre-sanded plywood base (slightly larger than the aquarium) and then place the mat that came with the aquarium on top. Depending upon your climate / house conditions, you might first seal the plywood base to help prevent it from absorbing moisture. I can understand you might not be interested in permanently affixing (i.e., gluing) a piece of plywood to the countertop. Still, you might consider testing out the setup after filling with water & gravel (but before you add fish & plants) to see if it moves too easily. Pre-sanded wood can be surprisingly agile on smooth surfaces.

The Fluval Flex 9 is a good-looking aquarium. If it was my decision, I would probably be inclined to err on the side of caution and use a combination high quality pre-sanded plywood & mat base (or find a different, suitable location).
If I used a piece of ply wood could I use felt feet to be able to move it? Or would that just be adding to the unevenness?
 
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dwc13

If I used a piece of ply wood could I use felt feet to be able to move it? Or would that just be adding to the unevenness?

If you install felt feet (all the same type & thickness, and ideally same size) on the bottom of the plywood, test it out with a level after affixing them. You want that plywood base (with or without felt feet) to be as level and stable as possible in its location on the counter before placing the leveling mat and aquarium on top. The leveling mat that came with your aquarium can help offset slight leveling differences and small imperfections. The extent it is able to do this depends in part upon its thickness and the material its made of. BTW, a high quality piece of pre-sanded plywood shouldn't have surface imperfections, but verify it is not slightly warped.
 
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StarGirl

What about like a thicker mat? Like a 1/4 inch thick yoga mat?
 
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dwc13

1. Are you trying to place the aquarium so it spans across the dip in the middle of the counter? In other words, the part of the aquarium over where the dip is located isn't in contact with the counter (and thus is unsupported). The "ends" of the aquarium would be in contact with the counter (supported).

2. Where does the "not level" issue come into play?
 
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StarGirl

Yeah it is dipped in the center long ways across the counter. There is a light dip spot when you put something on it.
 
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Flyfisha

I realise we have to be cautious when advising other people on how to install a glass tank in their home on their carpet. I know people worry about insurance and the death of fish or possibly injuring the human. As a person that worked with glass in my working life and is now retired I am constantly surprised at how freaked out people are about glass.
Glass has no strength if you tap it on an edge with a hard object. Probably a lot less strength than some imagine? When it comes to the strength of glass over a distance and the need to have it resting on a continuous surface all I can say is don’t panic.
Stargirl the Fluval is 9 gallons / 34 kilograms this is 37 gallons/ 140 kilograms.Its an old second hand tank . It is also 6 mm / 1/4 inch glass the same as the Fluval.
As well as posting a picture of this old tank that sitting outside in 40 degrees centigrade and minus 10 degrees in winter I will post a link to Cory’s stand he made with tanks spanning two feet supported at each end.
edit to add link


Link soon this tank has 4 little blocks of wood under it .
edit
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A silly lid on this Fluval makes for a very difficult tank to work on. I should know as I have a couple from the rubbish dump. I cut the tops off. Point is look at how Fluval has the bass of the tank supported?
 

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dwc13

A thicker leveling mat (such as a yoga mat) that allows for simultaneous contact between the counter, leveling mat and all parts of the aquarium bottom might be sufficient. Your call, lol. I'm more cautious when it comes to something like this.
 
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Flyfisha

I just walked into my fish room and remembered this tank. It’s only been sitting hear for a short time but it’s an example of what I feel is safe and some people think is not.
image.jpgThis tank has 5 mm corrugated cardboard under the two supports.
 
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