Tank Is Getting Dangerously Cold

SuperK

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Okay so I was pretty sure my heater was working, come back home today and find out the tank is at about 19 degrees c... Heater is set for 30. Yikes. I have a betta, anyone from the UK know a good heater? I need about 50w-100w, I have a 12 gal (55L) tank. I'd really prefer one that isn't made of glass since I'm extremely anxious about it cracking or something. I know it's unlikely but I deal with horrible anxiety haha. Is there any way I could keep him warm for now? I wanted to do a warm water change but I don't wanna put him through temp shock. He seems somewhat okay tho. He eats and comes up to greet me a lot. I can order the heater today, I just need to know some good UK ones, and preferably non glass.
 

Kiks

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Have you tried searching online? Usually you can find reviews and recommendations on a lot of products. In my opinion pretty much all heaters work well, especially when it's such a small tank it doesn't have to be anything fancy.
 

EternalDancer

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Marina do some good ones that are not glass, but I don't think they're adjustable.

Why so against glass? Both Marina and Tetra do good adjustable ones, but glass.

Wrap newspaper around the tank for now if you're worried about temp.
 
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SuperK

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Marina do some good ones that are not glass, but I don't think they're adjustable.

Why so against glass? Both Marina and Tetra do good adjustable ones, but glass.

Wrap newspaper around the tank for now if you're worried about temp.
I said in my post I get very worried about it cracking. Glass can only withstand so many heat/cool cycles from what I've heard. Plastic or some other material (like the aqueon pro) wouldn't shatter. I'm always worried I'm gonna stick my hand in there and get shocked omg. Glass heaters freak me out for so many reasons.
I'll try that, if I can't find any will a towel work?
 
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SuperK

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Have you tried searching online? Usually you can find reviews and recommendations on a lot of products. In my opinion pretty much all heaters work well, especially when it's such a small tank it doesn't have to be anything fancy.
I've looked around, lots of time it's American brands. I found the weird UK equiv of the Aqueon Pro but I've heard nothing but bad from it so I mean... I'm not sure what to do.

The heater I bought was supposed to be good but it doesn't even turn on. I would've kept my old heater if it wasn't getting a whole bunch of condensation in it. It was dangerously near the heating element. (Not only that but it would just kinda turn on whenever instead of when it needed to haha. My tank would reach 32 sometimes.)
 

Kiks

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I've looked around, lots of time it's American brands. I found the weird UK equiv of the Aqueon Pro but I've heard nothing but bad from it so I mean... I'm not sure what to do.

The heater I bought was supposed to be good but it doesn't even turn on. I would've kept my old heater if it wasn't getting a whole bunch of condensation in it. It was dangerously near the heating element. (Not only that but it would just kinda turn on whenever instead of when it needed to haha. My tank would reach 32 sometimes.)
So you bought a new heater that isn't working? Are you sure you did it all right? There are those weird rules that it has to sit in the water, etc. They can break quite easily (not as in the glass shatters, but it stops working) if you treat them "wrong".
 
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SuperK

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So you bought a new heater that isn't working? Are you sure you did it all right? There are those weird rules that it has to sit in the water, etc. They can break quite easily (not as in the glass shatters, but it stops working) if you treat them "wrong".
I let it sit for about 15 minutes before plugging it in. I've never had an issue like this before, it's really odd. Tbh though they say it's good but I bought a filter from the same company that stopped working after a week LOL. I've heard there's glass heaters that are like, unshatterable though. I guess my main fears are just like, electrocuting myself. I've been electrocuted before and I have this fear installed in me because of it.
 

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I let it sit for about 15 minutes before plugging it in. I've never had an issue like this before, it's really odd. Tbh though they say it's good but I bought a filter from the same company that stopped working after a week LOL. I've heard there's glass heaters that are like, unshatterable though. I guess my main fears are just like, electrocuting myself. I've been electrocuted before and I have this fear installed in me because of it.
Sounds like you did it right. I've never been electrocuted, so I wouldn't know, but it sounds horrible. It's very understandable that you'd try to avoid it happening again as much as possible. I'm sure there are some heaters available without glass. Good luck finding one!

Amazon.. there's thousands of heaters for cheap
That one is for maximum 25 liters, though.
 
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Bizarro252

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I said in my post I get very worried about it cracking. Glass can only withstand so many heat/cool cycles from what I've heard. Plastic or some other material (like the aqueon pro) wouldn't shatter. I'm always worried I'm gonna stick my hand in there and get shocked omg. Glass heaters freak me out for so many reasons.
I'll try that, if I can't find any will a towel work?
Eiheim are my favorite heaters, they are glass but treated glass that should be very shatter resistant (I think they even claim shatter proof)... But to ease your mine about getting shocked get yourself a GFI powerstrip, it will **** down power if there were to ever be a path for electricity into the tank water.

Also, IMO plastic heaters are much more risk, as plastic warps - King of DYI youtube dude even lost his stingrays due to a malfunctioning plastic heater
 
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SuperK

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Eiheim are my favorite heaters, they are glass but treated glass that should be very shatter resistant (I think they even claim shatter proof)... But to ease your mine about getting shocked get yourself a GFI powerstrip, it will down power if there were to ever be a path for electricity into the tank water.

Also, IMO plastic heaters are much more risk, as plastic warps - King of DYI youtube dude even lost his stingrays due to a malfunctioning plastic heater

Augh I remember that, so sad. Felt so sorry for him honestly. Glad he has new rays now.
I like Ehiem, don't want the ones you have to calibrate. Knowing me I would mess that up somehow. They do the ones you don't have to calibrate too right?

I put everything on power strips btw, UK is somewhat better since our plugs have 3 pins (Live, Neutral(?) and Ground). It's also AC instead of DC meaning that even if you were to get shocked you wouldn't be shocked by the full voltage. It still hurts so much, I once turned off an outlet that had water in it and I yelped. Worst mistake ever, we were steaming the wallpaper off the walls. It's now why I'm so scared of it happening again.
 

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Augh I remember that, so sad. Felt so sorry for him honestly. Glad he has new rays now.
I like Ehiem, don't want the ones you have to calibrate. Knowing me I would mess that up somehow. They do the ones you don't have to calibrate too right?

I put everything on power strips btw, UK is somewhat better since our plugs have 3 pins (Live, Neutral(?) and Ground). It's also AC instead of DC meaning that even if you were to get shocked you wouldn't be shocked by the full voltage. It still hurts so much, I once turned off an outlet that had water in it and I yelped. Worst mistake ever, we were steaming the wallpaper off the walls. It's now why I'm so scared of it happening again.
As far as I know all countries use AC power in their homes I believe you guys use 220volt vs the 110volt we have here in the US - but unsure.
A GFI power strip is different than a normal power strip. It has a box on it for the GFI part (stands for Ground Fault Interrupter) - it monitors power across the hot and neutral lines, if there is a mismatch (because power is leaking to ground via a faulty wire, cracked heater, etc) it will trip and cut power to the strip. Very handy for fishtanks IMO, you usually find them in the outlets in your bathroom, here in the US they are required in the bathroom and kitchen outlets - unsure about the UK - but you can see why they are handy to have in places where water and power could mix! These basically eliminate the possibility if you getting shocked due to a wiring fault in the water (as long as you plug your stuff into it, and not the wall _

Here is the ones I have:

Amazon.com: Tripp Lite 8 Outlet Safety Power Strip, 12ft Cord with GFCI 5-15P Plug, Hang Holes (TLM812GF): Home Audio & Theater
 
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SuperK

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As far as I know all countries use AC power in their homes I believe you guys use 220volt vs the 110volt we have here in the US - but unsure.
A GFI power strip is different than a normal power strip. It has a box on it for the GFI part (stands for Ground Fault Interrupter) - it monitors power across the hot and neutral lines, if there is a mismatch (because power is leaking to ground via a faulty wire, cracked heater, etc) it will trip and cut power to the strip. Very handy for fishtanks IMO, you usually find them in the outlets in your bathroom, here in the US they are required in the bathroom and kitchen outlets - unsure about the UK - but you can see why they are handy to have in places where water and power could mix! These basically eliminate the possibility if you getting shocked due to a wiring fault in the water (as long as you plug your stuff into it, and not the wall _

Here is the ones I have:

Amazon.com: Tripp Lite 8 Outlet Safety Power Strip, 12ft Cord with GFCI 5-15P Plug, Hang Holes (TLM812GF): Home Audio & Theater
I can't really find anything similar, the most I can find is surge protected ones which are what everyone uses here anyway. Is that the same thing?
 

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Nope, sadly those are not the same thing. It would have to say "GFI Power Strip" or it might say "GFCI Power Strip" There may also be adapters that will go inline between your wall and the power strip, just like a separate box.

Worst case, but an option, is to replace that outlet with a GFCI one, like you would see in your bathroom.

This is all just to give you peace of mind however, a reputable heater (Like an Ehiem) is very unlikely to ever shock you
 

Jinx13

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A surge protector as it's called in the UK ☺

However if you follow the instructions listed you will minimise the chance of electric shock.

Let the heater acclimatise to the tank temp before switching on

Switch off heater before any tank maintenance or putting your hands or any equipment in the tank.

Also plugging the heater into a surge protector will do the trick however in the UK a up to date fuse box will be sufficient.
 

EternalDancer

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Augh I remember that, so sad. Felt so sorry for him honestly. Glad he has new rays now.
I like Ehiem, don't want the ones you have to calibrate. Knowing me I would mess that up somehow. They do the ones you don't have to calibrate too right?

I put everything on power strips btw, UK is somewhat better since our plugs have 3 pins (Live, Neutral(?) and Ground). It's also AC instead of DC meaning that even if you were to get shocked you wouldn't be shocked by the full voltage. It still hurts so much, I once turned off an outlet that had water in it and I yelped. Worst mistake ever, we were steaming the wallpaper off the walls. It's now why I'm so scared of it happening again.
I did exactly the same thing! Steaming off wallpaper, flipped the socket, swore a lot.
Then the next day in the same room I fell through the stepladder and had bruises the size of rugby balls on my thighs for weeks.

I digress.

I missed where you said about cracking originally, sorry. The baby was jumping on me at the time.

Sub-question: my dad always told me to turn of filter/heater etc when dabbling in the tank in case of malfunction... wouldn't the fish all be dead if something had electrified the water?

Check B&Q/Wilkos/local electrics store for a surge protector/fault diversion job if you're concerned (which I get).


ETA: I just spent the last month at my partners in USA and was astounded to see plug sockets in the bathroom...
Not a thing over here.
 

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I wouldn't worry at all about the heater glass breaking. The only time they shatter is if you leave them plugged in out of the water then drop it back in. Ive done that a few times and they didn't break. Hit enough they sizzled when they hit the water. In normal operation the water absorbs the heat so fast the glass barely even gets warm. Grab the heater while under water and try it. Wuickly heats up under your hand though where it doesn't have water coolibg ut.
 
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