Taking Fish From The Wild

Paper Spiders

I have a moral dilemma.

I live in Northern California, and every year we have a local creek that is fed through a local lake/reservoir. The water is shut off during the summer, and the temps often reach over 100 degrees. The seasonal creek is home to many frogs, tadpoles and fish. I walk there everyday.

Now, I am currently building a 300g+ pond. I grow CA natives in my yard, and am very supportive of local conservation efforts.

Here's the thing. The temperature is climbing this week. There are only a few large-ish pools of water left, about 12 inches deep in the deepest spots. The minnows I have IDed as the Sacramento/California Roach. I can find no info online to see if they lay eggs in mud or if they can survive seasonal drought. I did read they they reach sexual maturity in 3 years, which makes me think they do not. I would normally NEVER condone removing wild animals and keeping them as pets, but these little minnows are just going to bake. I can give them a nice planted pond. They would share it with a school of white clouds.

What do you all think? Let nature take its course or save the minnows?
 

fish 321

As long as its legal I would go for it. Where I live it is ilegal to remove any aquatic creature from its habitat and keep it as a pet or move it to another body of water.
 

goldface

Go for it, if the law allows. I have zero issues with taking wild fish and keeping them. Even fish keepers against it are still benefiting, since even tank-raised stock had to originate from somewhere (i.e., the wild).
 

e_watson09

I wouldn't put a wild caught fish straight in with your others. You'll likely need to QT for a while due to the risk of disease and parasites. Personally, I wouldn't I also believe in Ohio (not sure about NC) it is illegal to take a native species as well without a license and/or permit.
 

CMB

I have a moral dilemma.

I live in Northern California, and every year we have a local creek that is fed through a local lake/reservoir. The water is shut off during the summer, and the temps often reach over 100 degrees. The seasonal creek is home to many frogs, tadpoles and fish. I walk there everyday.

Now, I am currently building a 300g+ pond. I grow CA natives in my yard, and am very supportive of local conservation efforts.

Here's the thing. The temperature is climbing this week. There are only a few large-ish pools of water left, about 12 inches deep in the deepest spots. The minnows I have IDed as the Sacramento/California Roach. I can find no info online to see if they lay eggs in mud or if they can survive seasonal drought. I did read they they reach sexual maturity in 3 years, which makes me think they do not. I would normally NEVER condone removing wild animals and keeping them as pets, but these little minnows are just going to bake. I can give them a nice planted pond. They would share it with a school of white clouds.

What do you all think? Let nature take its course or save the minnows?

Personally, I wouldn't see any moral issues with taking the animals from the wild. Are you giving them a life that is as good or better than they would have had in the wild? Just be sure to give them an extra nice home and go for it (after checking local laws, of course)! Honestly, I think that pulling fish from the wild might be better than buying them from a fish store where the fish have to go through a ton of horrible transports and tiny tanks and most of them die before they get to you.
 

Paper Spiders

It is illegal where I am.

However, this is not strictly enforced as I see people with buckets taking frogs and tadpoles almost everyday.

I'm not so concerned about the legality of the situation (as I am very certain I would not get caught) as much as I feel strange taking a native species and denying them the change to be wild anymore.

Ugh, I'm not sure why I'm so squeamish about this. My neighbors think this is a very altruistic move, but I see so many misguided people catch birds, frogs, squirrels and other wild things 'saving' and 'giving them a better life.' Usally resulting in their death. I hate joining their ranks.

I suppose my only impact on the environment is denying the raccoons an easy meal.
 

Suzanne2

You can always just contact the local wildlife law enforcement agency and ask them specifically if you (or they) could rescue the fish from the drying up water body. They may even allow you to rehome them to your pond. Depending on local laws a rehabilitation permit may be needed, but they would let you know...
Rescue of animals facing death, particularly when due to manmade environmental changes such as draining reservoirs, is one of the reasons there are environmental conservation agencies.
 

Wraithen

You can always just contact the local wildlife law enforcement agency and ask them specifically if you (or they) could rescue the fish from the drying up water body. They may even allow you to rehome them to your pond. Depending on local laws a rehabilitation permit may be needed, but they would let you know...
Rescue of animals facing death, particularly when due to manmade environmental changes such as draining reservoirs, is one of the reasons there are environmental conservation agencies.
Too bad they aren't shad. That state will bulldoze houses and raze crops to protect shad!
 

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