Question Switching Everything+fish From Un-cycled 10g To Brand New 20g Tank?

milankosaurus

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Hi, i currently have un-cycled freshwater 10g tank with 5 male platies and 2 nerite snails. after rearranging some furniture, now i have space for a bigger tank (which i originally wanted lol). I am currently doing fish-in cycle and still in first stage (its been 1 month of max .5ppm ammonia, no nitrites or nitrates yet, pH 6.6) and was wondering if it would be safe to transfer all substrate, driftwood, plants, decorations and of course filter over to brand new 20g tank along with 50% of water from old tank to new tank one shot with fish and snails? I unfortunately do not have a space for 10g tank along with 20g tank/can't keep it for too long as i live in a small apartment...

i have read online and on forums that most people seem to wait at least a month for new tank to stabilize, but since i have no nitrogen cycle yet/no changes in parameters, could i potentially go ahead and just simply transfer everything to new tank along with 5 platies and 2 nerite snails?
 
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Joshuaharestad

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Hi, i currently have un-cycled freshwater 10g tank with 5 male platies and 2 nerite snails. after rearranging some furniture, now i have space for a bigger tank (which i originally wanted lol). I am currently doing fish-in cycle and still in first stage (its been 1 month of max .5ppm ammonia, no nitrites or nitrates yet, pH 6.6) and was wondering if it would be safe to transfer all substrate, driftwood, plants, decorations and of course filter over to brand new 20g tank along with 50% of water from old tank to new tank one shot with fish and snails? I unfortunately do not have a space for 10g tank along with 20g tank/can't keep it for too long as i live in a small apartment...

i have read online and on forums that most people seem to wait at least a month for new tank to stabilize, but since i have no nitrogen cycle yet/no changes in parameters, could i potentially go ahead and just simply transfer everything to new tank along with 5 platies and 2 nerite snails?
If you're not cycled then the higher volume of water should help a bit. You're going to habe to keep a close eye on ammonia. If the old filter started cycling then transferring may help jump start the cycle on the new one.
 

Heron

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If your existing tank is in the process of cycling and you are intending to transfer the filter media you probably will end up no worse of for moving your fish. Most your filter bacteria are on the media so if you transfer this you will have as much bacteria as you have in you current tank. Ideally you would have your fish in cycled tank and you wouldn't move them until you have completed a fish less cycle on your new one. But as your existing tank isn't cycled and your new tank is bigger and therefore will not build up ammonia as quickly the conditions in the new tank should be as good as your old one. Keep cycling after you make the change . I hope it goes ok.
 

jdhef

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I would transfer as much of the old water as possible, this way to the fish it just feels like a water change.

I can see why it's been a month and you're still in the ammonia phase of the cycle. With a pH under 7.0 ammonia starts turning into ammonium, and by the time your pH gets to 6.0 all ammonia has turned into ammonium. The problem with ammonium is that it is a terrible food source for the bacteria. In fact with a pH in the low 6's, it can become impossible to cycle a tank.

So...you may want to consider adding some crushed coral into your filter. The crushed coral will raise your pH. I believe the recommended dose is 1 cup for 30g (is that correct @Momgoose56 ?).

Then if you have your pH level at 7.0 or above, you could try using Tetra SafeStart+ to cycle the tank with a good chance of success. (It may work with a pH of 6.6, but I wouldn't feel as certain). If you choose to use TSS+ post so you can get some guidance on using it properly. For some reason that totally escapes me, Tetra doesn't include instruction, and it does need to be used in a specific way.

Best of luck!
 

H Farnsworth

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Ammonium is however much less toxic than ammonia
 

milankosaurus

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I would transfer as much of the old water as possible, this way to the fish it just feels like a water change.

I can see why it's been a month and you're still in the ammonia phase of the cycle. With a pH under 7.0 ammonia starts turning into ammonium, and by the time your pH gets to 6.0 all ammonia has turned into ammonium. The problem with ammonium is that it is a terrible food source for the bacteria. In fact with a pH in the low 6's, it can become impossible to cycle a tank.

So...you may want to consider adding some crushed coral into your filter. The crushed coral will raise your pH. I believe the recommended dose is 1 cup for 30g (is that correct @Momgoose56 ?).

Then if you have your pH level at 7.0 or above, you could try using Tetra SafeStart+ to cycle the tank with a good chance of success. (It may work with a pH of 6.6, but I wouldn't feel as certain). If you choose to use TSS+ post so you can get some guidance on using it properly. For some reason that totally escapes me, Tetra doesn't include instruction, and it does need to be used in a specific way.

Best of luck!
That is exactly the plan. TSS+ is on the way so i will be using that in new tank. I believe you dump the whole bottle in the tank and wait 2 weeks without water change. I have read that with lower pH your tank will still cycle but takes longer. My tap water is pH 7 so i think mopani wood i have in the tank is causing the drop to 6.6. I want to see if doubling the amount of water it sits in (from 10g to 20g) will get the pH close to 7. If not i will use aragonite/crushed coral to bring up the pH. I love the look of natural woods in tanks so im trying to keep it. I also have nerite snails so i think they will appreciate crushed coral

Ammonium is however much less toxic than ammonia
correct hence why i think my fish r doing just fine, but at cost of cycle taking forever
 
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jdhef

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Here how you should use the TSS+:
1) Do a large water change to get ammonia as close to 0ppm as possible
2) Wait 24 hours (very important, using TSS+ less than 24 hours after a water conditioner will cause it to fail)
3) Add entire, well shaken bottle of TSS+. Don't worry if it will treat a larger tank, you can't overdose.
4) Do nothing but lightly feed your fish for the next 14 days (no water changes, no adding chemicals...nothing)
5) On day 14 test, and if all worked correctly, you'll have a cycled tank.

Because ammonia and ammonium can exist in the tank at the same time when the pH in the mid to high 6's, a tank can cycle, but it may be slower since there is a reduced amount of food for the bacteria. The problem can be that you will end up with a smaller bacteria colony because even though ammonia read (for example) 1ppm, due to a lower pH you only had .5ppm of ammonia. Since there was a smaller amount of food, some of the TSS+ bacteria will starve off.
 

FeederGuppies

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That is exactly the plan. TSS+ is on the way so i will be using that in new tank. I believe you dump the whole bottle in the tank and wait 2 weeks without water change. I have read that with lower pH your tank will still cycle but takes longer. My tap water is pH 7 so i think mopani wood i have in the tank is causing the drop to 6.6. I want to see if doubling the amount of water it sits in (from 10g to 20g) will get the pH close to 7. If not i will use aragonite/crushed coral to bring up the pH. I love the look of natural woods in tanks so im trying to keep it. I also have nerite snails so i think they will appreciate crushed coral


correct hence why i think my fish r doing just fine, but at cost of cycle taking forever
Can you remove the wood and then add it back once the tank is cycled?
 

milankosaurus

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Here how you should use the TSS+:
1) Do a large water change to get ammonia as close to 0ppm as possible
2) Wait 24 hours (very important, using TSS+ less than 24 hours after a water conditioner will cause it to fail)
3) Add entire, well shaken bottle of TSS+. Don't worry if it will treat a larger tank, you can't overdose.
4) Do nothing but lightly feed your fish for the next 14 days (no water changes, no adding chemicals...nothing)
5) On day 14 test, and if all worked correctly, you'll have a cycled tank.

Because ammonia and ammonium can exist in the tank at the same time when the pH in the mid to high 6's, a tank can cycle, but it may be slower since there is a reduced amount of food for the bacteria. The problem can be that you will end up with a smaller bacteria colony because even though ammonia read (for example) 1ppm, due to a lower pH you only had .5ppm of ammonia. Since there was a smaller amount of food, some of the TSS+ bacteria will starve off.
hi, so i did add crushed coral 8 days ago and did all your steps above and out of curiosity i tested my water (3rd day of TSS+) and here are the results:
pH=7.2
ammo= 0
nitrite=0
nitrate=5

kh=3
gh=6

does this mean i am actually finally cycled??? 3 days after adding TSS+ and 8 weeks total since i started fish in cycle??? i did swap tanks from 10g to 20g 2 weeks ago along with every single thing from 10g tank.
could TSS+ boost the bacteria so much or are these false readings?

edit: I also see super tiny, almost microscopic bubbles in my whole tank floating around. fish and snails are completely fine. what could those bubbles mean?
 
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