Swim Bladder Issues in Thicklip Gourami (Video Included)

HungriestPuffer

Tank
What is the water volume of the tank? 29 gallons
How long has the tank been running? 5 months
Does it have a filter? Aquaclear 50 HOB, 10 gallon sponge filter with air stone, in the middle of transitioning to Seachem Tidal 55 (been on alongside the other two filters for 2 weeks). All are set to lower flow.
Does it have a heater? Yes
What is the water temperature? 77 to 78 degrees fahrenheit, using a temp controller
What is the entire stocking of this tank? 6 corydoras elegans, 9 diamond tetras (originally only 6, but they bred in my tank and there are 2 juveniles and 1 fry big enough to live), 3 honey gouramis (two females and 1 male, I added the male this week after his quarantine period and treatment with anti-parasite meds and that was the biggest change to the tank), 1 Thicklip (the sick fish, female) gourami, 4 nerite snails, 2 mystery snails, 6 amano shrimp

Maintenance
How often do you change the water? once per week
How much of the water do you change? 50%
What do you use to treat your water? Seachem Prime
Do you vacuum the substrate or just the water? Mostly the water, a few spots of the substrate per change. I have a planted tank.

*Parameters - Very Important
Did you cycle your tank before adding fish? Yes
What do you use to test the water? API Freshwater Master Test Kit (once weekly before changes); Aquarium Co-Op strips for quick checks
What are your parameters? We need to know the exact numbers, not just “fine” or “safe”.
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 30-40ppm (due for a water change either tomorrow or tuesday)
pH: 8.0

Feeding
How often do you feed your fish? once per day plus one fast day on Sundays (today was fast day, today was when symptoms became noticeable)
How much do you feed your fish? A pinch of flakes for the tetras, some repashy gel food to reach the corydoras on the bottom. Sometimes I mix it up and add a catfish tablet by Xtreme aquatics or some bug bites small pellets, and I often try to feed a little extra repashy to give the snails something to eat
What brand of food do you feed your fish? A mix! Repashy, XTreme Aquatics, Hikari, Fluval, New Life Spectrum, sometimes live baby brine and sometimes frozen foods by Omega One
Do you feed frozen? Yes, Blood Worms and Frozen Daphnia as a treat twice a week
Do you feed freeze-dried foods? Occasionally freeze-dried bloodworms instead of frozen

Illness & Symptoms
How long have you had this fish? 2 to 3 months
How long ago did you first notice these symptoms? Today
In a few words, can you explain the symptoms? Struggling to swim downwards, floating and drifting to the top of the tank, heavy breathing
Have you started any treatment for the illness? No, I only isolated her into a quarantine tank to give her a rest. Not sure where to start with treatment.
Was your fish physically ill or injured upon purchase? No
How has its behavior and appearance changed, if at all? See above!

Hi, today I noticed my thicklipped gourami having swim issues. I've attached a video of her to show you how she's acting. She is interested in feeding and keeps pecking at food, and she has no visible injuries. I'm not sure if she's bloated because she's always looked a little 'thick.' Today was fasting day, and this is when symptoms started.

Thanks in advance for any help. I'd love to be able to help my wonderful girl, and I'm really attached to this sweet fish. She's been such a delight with an outgoing personality, and if she can be nursed to health, I want to do it.

Streamable Video
 

A201

Chances are the Gourami is simply constipated causing pressure on the swim bladder.
When that happens, air can't be easily expelled out of the bladder, making the affected fish very buoyant.
Try fasting for two days, then begin feeding a plant based flake or pellet.
 
Upvote 0

HungriestPuffer

Chances are the Gourami is simply constipated causing pressure on the swim bladder.
When that happens, air can't be easily expelled out of the bladder, making the affected fish very buoyant.
Try fasting for two days, then begin feeding a plant based flake or pellet.

I moved her to a quarantine tank to rest (so she isn’t chased out of a corner by the male honey) and gave her a 10 min epsom salt bath. She’ll fast for another few days. Seems comfortable as she can be if stressed
 
Upvote 0

HungriestPuffer

Chances are the Gourami is simply constipated causing pressure on the swim bladder.
When that happens, air can't be easily expelled out of the bladder, making the affected fish very buoyant.
Try fasting for two days, then begin feeding a plant based flake or pellet.

Update today! The epsom salt bath, fasting, and quarantining is really helping her. She is back to swimming completely normally and her bloat has gone down. I'll keep her separated for about a week to make sure she stays good and resumes eating without problems, but hopefully she'll be okay. I'll reassess my feeding practices in the main tank and cut back on how much I feed to prevent this from happening again in the future. Thank you!
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
10
Views
183
Hemikyle
Replies
7
Views
167
MacZ
Replies
36
Views
362
StarGirl
Replies
1
Views
50
BigManAquatics
  • Question
Replies
1
Views
170
Initiate

Random Great Thread

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom