SW fish generally have more interesting behaviors than FW fish in aquaria?

bluesky2111

Member
Do you agree with this? Don't get me wrong I love both sides of the hobby, but in my experience saltwater fish (those that are seen in home aquaria) are generally more interesting. Here's why:

- Some fish can form symbiotic relationship with others, aka goby-shrimp, or clown-anemone.

- Some fish can change their gender (clown, anthias, wrasse,...)

- Correct me if I'm wrong, but most SW fish we keep are good parents or at least they take care of their young, even peaceful schooling/shoaling species like the Banggai or Chromis. We rarely see that in FW, like the Tetra, livebearers or Rainbow. They all eat their fry.
 

LowConductivity

Member
Can't speak to saltwater fish, but agree on the behavior. The freshwater cleaner fish, and sex changers are crazy.
 

Broggy

Member
bluesky2111 said:
- Some fish can change their gender (clown, anthias, wrasse,...)
woah, I did not know that. gotta love a transgender clown fish.

obviously things like oscars and large puffers are good wet pets, but your right, tetras are kinda just...there
 

Alejandro

Member
The ocean is very big and the diversity that evolved is much greater. So to start there are more things to choose from.

Since the freshwater hobby is bigger and older a greater proportion of total animals have been used - not just the most colourful and interesting "cream".

Also marine aquaria use many more animal groups so they do display more diversity and allow more interactions. If we did the same for freshwater we would see a lot more amazing things.

If you want to blow your mind look up cave angelfish or try the olm that can live 100 years and go 10 years without food. What about the sneaky blue gill sunfish. There are extraordinary things about even common aquarium fish if you look at their adaptations.

But if you don't consider the marine aquarium hobby has only tapped a tiny amount of the available biodiversity and they obviously chose the cream first - then yes it does look like the fish are on average more interesting.

And where do you want to put brackish? Archerfish and mudskippers are pretty amazing. Certainly rival most marine pet fish for odd behaviour.
 

qldmick

Member
You made me think of think of this for interesting FW fish behavior,
 

Jesterrace

Member
bluesky2111 said:
Do you agree with this? Don't get me wrong I love both sides of the hobby, but in my experience saltwater fish (those that are seen in home aquaria) are generally more interesting. Here's why:

- Some fish can form symbiotic relationship with others, aka goby-shrimp, or clown-anemone.

- Some fish can change their gender (clown, anthias, wrasse,...)

- Correct me if I'm wrong, but most SW fish we keep are good parents or at least they take care of their young, even peaceful schooling/shoaling species like the Banggai or Chromis. We rarely see that in FW, like the Tetra, livebearers or Rainbow. They all eat their fry.
Absolutely. In addition to that Saltwater fish generally have more interesting individual personality quirks. When was the last time you saw a freshwater fish curl it's tail under itself to use as a chair and press it's face up against the glass to people watch (common behavior for a lawnmower blenny). Wrasses have really fun individual personality quirks all on their own (ie grabbing food and leading fish on a chase around the tank, doing a looping dance for it's dinner when they see you approaching the tank, Flopping on their side and burying themselves in the sand each night).
 

Alejandro

Member
We all love our fish like we all love our children - we know them better than we know other's fish (and chlidren), we adore their quirks more than the quirks of others that we've never seen and don't know exist. Our one is the prettiest, smartest, most loving - you name it ... we are biased.

I'm putting up my hand for diversity - not the shallow neo-marxist identity politics diversity of LARPing students - but real deep diversity and the only kind that counts biological diversity. Every creature in every one of your tanks can trace its origin back through 3.7 billion years without a single ancestor that failed. They have each achieved the near impossible feat of gathering the tools required to survive and adapting to the specifics of their location and time. They are all extraordinary but each in different ways - but they are all equally successful: they are alive today (thats all that counts) ...tomorrow who knows?
 
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bluesky2111

Member
Jesterrace said:
Absolutely. In addition to that Saltwater fish generally have more interesting individual personality quirks. When was the last time you saw a freshwater fish curl it's tail under itself to use as a chair and press it's face up against the glass to people watch (common behavior for a lawnmower blenny). Wrasses have really fun individual personality quirks all on their own (ie grabbing food and leading fish on a chase around the tank, doing a looping dance for it's dinner when they see you approaching the tank, Flopping on their side and burying themselves in the sand each night).
Darn, you just described my Melanurus wrasse. This bad girl (soon to be a man) knows how to break food apart. I gave her big pellet and she hit it against the rock to break it. I've never seen fish doing this.
 

Jesterrace

Member
bluesky2111 said:
Darn, you just described my Melanurus wrasse. This bad girl (soon to be a man) knows how to break food apart. I gave her big pellet and she hit it against the rock to break it. I've never seen fish doing this.
Mine does that with large pieces of Seaweed, LRS Reef Frenzy and pretty much anything else. Mine also found a way to keep itself going after it got stung in the jaw by my foxface (it's jaw was stuck open for about 2-3 weeks). I was horrified it was going to starve to death, but Mr. Smartypants wasn't so easily defeated. It figured out that when I would feed Reef Frenzy, it could swim around with it's mouth wide open and essentially filter feed on the smaller bits. This was enough to keep it going until it's jaw healed and now it eats just like normal again. Never seen anything like that behavior from any freshwater fish.

Incidentally this is the fish in question:

 

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