55 Gallon Tank Sun Sun 304b Not Cleaning

Dan Kelly

Member
Hello every one,

I purchased a sun sun canister filter and received it a couple days ago. I follow the directions and the water flow is working great. It's doesn't seem to be cleaning the tank at all. I have a brown/green haze in the tank ( As you see below). The pump has been running about 3 days with no change. Am I doing something wrong?


pic3.jpg
 

Goodbye

Member
Most filters are not able to directly remove green water, although your filter's uv light may help. This looks like an algae bloom.
1. What is your lighting intensity and photo period?
2 Have you tested your nitrate and phosphate levels? If so, what are they?
 
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Dan Kelly

Member
The lighting is LED lights in the hood. I have not tested the nitrate and phosphate. How would I do that? Do I buy a kit. Do you recommend one?
Thanks for the follow up.
 

PoorBigBlue

Member
  • Thread Starter

Dan Kelly

Member
This is my first Canister, therefor I didn't have any media except the normal filters that hang over the back. I used all new media.

In all fairness, I was having the algae bloom before the new canister filter was installed. What good it is if it doesn't clean the tank?
 

Goodbye

Member
Dan Kelly said:
The lighting is LED lights in the hood. I have not tested the nitrate and phosphate. How would I do that? Do I buy a kit. Do you recommend one?
Thanks for the follow up.
API sells these test kits. Something is feeding your algae, most likely excess phosphates and having your lights turned on for too many hours per day.
 
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Dan Kelly

Member
Bill Scott said:
API sells these test kits. Something is feeding your algae, most likely excess phosphates and having your lights turned on for too many hours per day.
Yea I usually keep them on all day and of course turn off at night. Any recommendations on how many hours?
 

Goodbye

Member
Dan Kelly said:
Yea I usually keep them on all day and of course turn off at night. Any recommendations on how many hours?
Since you don't have live plants, until you get the green water under control, turn off the lights completely. Normal room daylight will be enough for your fish.
 

PoorBigBlue

Member
Do you know about the nitrogen cycle? Click on the link, and read up.

Since no media was moved over, your tank is building up on ammonia. That ammonia is extremely toxic to your fish - and can also contribute to algae blooms, like the one you're having. I'd guarantee phosphates aren't your problem here, at least not your largest one.

Once you've read up on the nitrogen cycle, you'll want to buy an API Freshwater Master Test Kit, and then start doing water changes. You want ammonia and nitrite to be 0 PPM, but if you can keep them under 1 PPM in a cycle, you should be okay for a short period of time. Test every day or so, and do a water change accordingly.

Just because a filter doesn't clean the stuff you can see from your water doesn't mean it doesn't clean your water to make it safe for fish. Bacteria grow in your filter, which turn the ammonia your fish produce into nitrite, and then into nitrate - ammonia and nitrite are both extremely toxic to your fish, and WILL kill them. Nitrate is pretty safe, however. That's why we use filters - to make our aquariums liveable.

As for the lights, you can keep them on for 8-10 hours a day - to clear up on algae bloom, try to only keep them on when you're around for now.
 
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Dan Kelly

Member
Bill Scott said:
Since you don't have live plants, until you get the green water under control, turn off the lights completely. Normal room daylight will be enough for your fish.
I do have live plants though.
 

Goodbye

Member
Dan Kelly said:
In all fairness, I was having the algae bloom before the new canister filter was installed. What good it is if it doesn't clean the tank?
The filter is designed to house beneficial bacteria and remove organics from the water. A brand new filter will not yet contain beneficial bacteria so it is unable to help control excess nutrients already in the tank, eventually it will however.
If you haven't done so already, add some activated carbon to your filter.

Dan Kelly said:
I do have live plants though.
Then cut your lighting back to 6 hours or so.
 

AquaticJ

Member
I don’t know what filters you guys are using but mine make my water crystal clear, not just hold my cycle. That said, you guys are right that it won’t do anything for green water, that's a separate issue. Turn off the light as was said, and also do more water changes.
 

PoorBigBlue

Member
AquaticJ said:
I don’t know what filters you guys are using but mine make my water crystal clear, not just hold my cycle. That said, you guys are right that it won’t do anything for green water, that's a separate issue. Turn off the light as was said, and also do more water changes.
Filters themselves don't clean water as I think OP was thinking - they will make your water clear, but they won't "clean" your water without a cycle being in place.
 

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AquaticJ said:
I don’t know what filters you guys are using but mine make my water crystal clear, not just hold my cycle. That said, you guys are right that it won’t do anything for green water, that's a separate issue. Turn off the light as was said, and also do more water changes.
AquaticJ said:
I don’t know what filters you guys are using but mine make my water crystal clear, not just hold my cycle. That said, you guys are right that it won’t do anything for green water, that's a separate issue. Turn off the light as was said, and also do more water changes.
Water changes are appropriate in almost every aquarium situation, except in the case of green water where they can actually exacerbate the problem. Why?
While the water change will certainly lower the levels of macro nutrients like nitrate and phosphate, which is good, it doesn't address the underlying source of these nutrients, so they will still be produced.
The water change (if using tap water) can introduce a host of MICRO nutrients lincluding calcium, magnesium and boron.
Now add these new micro nutrients with the phosphate/nitrate still being produced in the aquarium and in a few days the water can be greener than before the water change. It's a vicious cycle.
 

AquaticJ

Member
Bill Scott said:
Water changes are appropriate in almost every aquarium situation, except in the case of green water where they can actually exacerbate the problem. Why?
While the water change will certainly lower the levels of macro nutrients like nitrate and phosphate, which is good, it doesn't address the underlying source of these nutrients, so they will still be produced.
The water change (if using tap water) can introduce a host of MICRO nutrients lincluding calcium, magnesium and boron.
Now add these new micro nutrients with the phosphate/nitrate still being produced in the aquarium and in a few days the water can be greener than before the water change. It's a vicious cycle.
Unless it’s being caused by too much light and excessive nitrogen, so that's why he should turn the light off. The water changes will remove the nitrogen. If it does get worse then you need to look at the phosphates. I get what you’re saying though.
 

goldface

Member
Green water is good for your fish. Technically you don’t even need a cycle. But yes, lights and excess nutrients are the main effect.
 
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Dan Kelly

Member
AquaticJ said:
I don’t know what filters you guys are using but mine make my water crystal clear, not just hold my cycle. That said, you guys are right that it won’t do anything for green water, that's a separate issue. Turn off the light as was said, and also do more water changes.
Waiting on mine to be crystal clear.
 

Goodbye

Member
scarface said:
Green water is good for your fish. Technically you don’t even need a cycle. But yes, lights and excess nutrients are the main effect.
Agreed, green water can be good for the fish but it will reduce the light for the plants you are actually trying to grow and at night, when the lights go out, can rob the tank of oxygen.
 

goldface

Member
Bill Scott said:
Agreed, green water can be good for the fish but it will reduce the light for the plants you are actually trying to grow and at night, when the lights go out, can rob the tank of oxygen.
You might be right about the plants, but I think the oxygen depletion at night is exaggerrated. Well, at least I don’t think it takes so much away that the fish would die. I used grass clippings on my outdoor tub to make green water. It makes the OP’s tank look pretty clear. My fish are, however, perfectly fine. I never heard of mass fish deaths or suffering from green water regardless of what I read on the internet.

I’m not sure if his exact filter contains a UV serilizer. If so, it’s supposed to clear up green water. If not, then cut back on the lighting, feed less, and do lots of water changes.
 

Islandvic

Member
Get some PolyFill from a crafts store or WalMart and a roll of filter pad media, similar to this one from Amazon....


Screenshot_20181111-173420_Chrome.jpg


The tray after your coarse sponge should have a layer of PolyFill and 1-2 layers of the poly filter pad cut from the roll to fit. It will take care of your fine mechanical filtration and keep your bio-media a lot cleaner.

It won't necessarily help with the green algae problem, but will help keep it clear once the algae is resolved.

Also, if your SunSun came with the plastic "bio-balls", I would toss those and replace it with either Fluval Bio-Max or Seachem Matrix. Plastic bio balls have no where near the surface area of ceramic or pumice stone based bio-media. The latter has exponentially more surface area for the beneficial bacteria to colonize.

Does your SunSun have the UV light?
 

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