suicidal pacus Help 

  • Thread starter

caren

New Member
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Points
76
Experience
More than 10 years
I have 3 Red-belly Pacu in a 55-gallon tank. They are approx 12 long, and have grown to this size in this tank. When cleaning the filter screen I inadvertantly pulled the impellor. All three fish immediately began slamming into the walls and top of the tank. They continued this until two of them were fatally injured. The third fish survived after about an hour of forced oxygen and upright support. Has anyone heard of or had this experience?
 

platy ben

Well Known Member
Messages
2,659
Reaction score
17
Points
133
Experience
5 to 10 years
Its heard of a lot, hence why pacus are known as "tank busters" 3 pacus in a 55 gallon is cruel in my opinon. I wouldn't even put one in anything less than 150 gallon, preferably a 300G
 

e_watson09

Well Known Member
Messages
3,678
Reaction score
585
Points
198
Experience
More than 10 years
agreed.

I was about to say for some reason I feel like that tank is much too small for them.
 

Nitro Junkie

Valued Member
Messages
122
Reaction score
4
Points
103
Experience
5 to 10 years
caren said:
I have 3 Red-belly Pacu in a 55-gallon tank. They are approx 12 long, and have grown to this size in this tank.
Growing to the size of the tank is called stunting. It is when the fish's body stops growing,but the internal organs continue to grow,killing the fish.Fish do not grow to the size of their tank.This is a common misconception.You need to have a tank that will fit the adult size of the fish.

Pacu need huge tanks.300 gallons is a good tank size to shoot for. Bigger is always better.

As you have found out,they will also destroy a tank,and themselves. Ponds are best for these monsters.
 
  • Moderator

Lucy

Moderator
Messages
45,201
Reaction score
2,424
Points
1,383
Experience
5 to 10 years
Hi caren Welcome to FishLore!!

I'm not sure where every one's manner went. Three responses with no hello or welcome.

I'm really sorry about your fish.
Along with the problem with the size tank, it would be a good idea to check the readings for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate.

I notice you were messing with the filter. Any chance there was an electrical problem that could have sent a shock through the water?
 

sirdarksol

Fishlore Legend
Messages
13,064
Reaction score
253
Points
383
Experience
3 years
Welcome to Fishlore Caren! I hope you've stuck around through this. ;D
With regards to the actual problem you had, which seems to have nothing to do with pacu's size, I wonder if, when you pulled the impeller, something electric got exposed to the water. It wouldn't necessarily have to be enough to shock anything. Many fish have the ability to sense electric current, and use it for hunting/defense. Pacu come from very murky water, and it makes sense that they would typically rely on this a lot (though I'm not positive they have the ability... I'm theorizing here). Even a mild electric current flowing through the water could easily make them panic and try to get away; much like many other animals when exposed to sudden, odd stimuli.

Nitro Junkie said:
Growing to the size of the tank is called stunting. It is when the fish's body stops growing,but the internal organs continue to grow,killing the fish.Fish do not grow to the size of their tank.This is a common misconception.You need to have a tank that will fit the adult size of the fish.
The "internal organs continue to grow" thing seems to be a myth, as well. I've been looking into it for a couple of years now, and while I've found very little scientific info, there were two articles regarding farmed catfish, enforced stunting, and organ growth. It seems that at least some of the organs actually remain young (not just small, but young) in stunted fish.
Of course, this doesn't mean it's harmless. Those same articles also talked about the side effects. Prolonged stunting (and we're talking mere months here) causes increased chances of permanent infertility. At the one year mark, pretty much all of the fish studied were permanently infertile. Fertility can be seen as the canary in the mine. When it goes, there's often something really wrong going on. The problem is that, in the farming industry, nobody cares as long as the fish still make big, tasty fillets.

Pacu need huge tanks.300 gallons is a good tank size to shoot for. Bigger is always better.
I definitely agree that bigger is better, though I'm not sure anymore that even 300g is enough. I've seen a pacu that would barely fit vertically in a friend's 300g tank. I'm with you on the idea that they belong in ponds.
 

Goldwing_Don

Well Known Member
Messages
962
Reaction score
1
Points
103
Experience
More than 10 years
Welcome To Fishlore caren
 
Toggle Sidebar

New Threads

Similar Threads

Aquarium Calculator

Aquarium Photo Contests

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media





Top Bottom