Sudden Adf Eggs

Paper Spiders

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I have a 6G, no-tech walstad tank. It's inhabitants are about a billion RCS shrimp (unintentional shrimplets used as frog food), a couple of micro crabs and the two frogs. I used to have an air line, but it greatly upset the frogs, so there is no flow. Frogs love it.

Today I woke up to eggs everywhere. I'm thinking about trying to save them as a fun project, but I am curious what other people's experience is raising these guys. Also, I do not have any extra tank set up, so I am wary of separating the eggs into an uncycled tank. Advice?

My other tank has a canister filter with lots of spare foam inside, so I suppose I can 'seed' a new tank. I've heard that the tadpoles will hatch in 48 hours, though, so I dont think I have much time.

Any advice is appreciated!

any frog experts?
 
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Paper Spiders

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They were still mating this morning, So I would guess they are?

They look like brown dots. Pretty small.
 

MD_Plants

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So i will just tell you what i would do, and you can use what advice you want

first, you need to move them into another tank as soon as you can. Make sure the tank had a heat strip set to 80 degrees. i recommend using a 10 gallon but you can get away with smaller.

DO NOT USE A FILTER. They are perfectly ok in stagnant water and prefer it.

They do require a higher ph. If your ph is below 7.5, add a teaspoon of baking soda for every 4 - 5 gallons of water.

Babies are very very very sensitive. After they hatch, you can grind up fish flakes, or what i do is hard boil eggs and then smash up the yolks (i do this for fry as well).

Make sure your very very careful when moving not to hurt any of the eggs.

Best of luck!
 
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Paper Spiders

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Thank you, MD plants! I can certainly make this happen. I have pretty high PH, so that shouldn't be a problem.

How often do I need to change the water?

Also, I fed a bullfrog tadpole Repashy solient Green gel food, and he did really well. Would these little guys appreciate the gel food, or should I do crushed flakes, etc?
 

MD_Plants

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I think they might be too big for the gel, but it’s up to you. I would change it every other day depending on the amount that hatch and tank size. maybe 1/3 of the tank that is preheated to prevent shock. These guys are born around .13 inches long, so there very very tiny. If you have any anubias with biofilm or anything, i would throw that is as well. It’s optional but they will much on it
 
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Paper Spiders

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The tank that they are in has no.filter and is full of plants with biofilm. I think I'll grab a 20g from Petco and throw some random plants in there, but keep it bare bottom. Thank you!

Should I be concerned about water depth at all?
 

bitseriously

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In the early stages, smaller jars, containers, bowls and so forth are way more appropriate for raising baby African dwarf frogs.
In fact, just to get the ball rolling, you can remove the eggs to a shallow sour cream style plastic container and float that in the main tank. Or you can put it in a water bath tank just as easily. But smaller is definitely better.
I’m going from memory here, so forgive me if some of my exact numbers are imprecise. The eggs should hatch within just one or two days. Do not feed the newly hatched larva for another two days after that, they will be surviving quite happily on their yolk sacks.
For the first 4-6 days after that, I kept mine alive and seemingly quite happy on microscopic critters from plant clippings from my various tanks. I simply took small clippings of older leaves and other bits such as dead leaf fragments etc and place them into the jars with the tiny baby frogs.
Once the babies are about 6-7 days old, the best food for them will be live baby brine shrimp. Fishlore and YouTube are full of instructionals on how to get that going, it’s relatively easy.
Also, check the stickied threads under the amphibians page here on Fishlore, I believe there are one or two articles that provide a lot more detail. But no matter how you look at it, it’s a time commitment for sure. You will need to feed the babies at least 3 and preferably more times per day for the better part of a month, and you will need increasing amounts of tank or jar space as the babies get larger.
 
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Paper Spiders

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oh, awesome, thank you!

One thing, the tank the frogs are in (and the eggs) is unheated. Should I still up the temperature to 80 degrees? I can float them in my other tank, that one has a heater, its just much warmer than the tank they are currently in.
 

FishMommer

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SO coool! Praying for your baby ADF success! Photos? Would love to see what your Walstad looks like. Planning on getting extra ADF's soon so very interested in your thread. All the best to you.
 

bitseriously

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oh, awesome, thank you!

One thing, the tank the frogs are in (and the eggs) is unheated. Should I still up the temperature to 80 degrees? I can float them in my other tank, that one has a heater, its just much warmer than the tank they are currently in.
I did mine in a water bath setup at about 78f. I suspect they’ll hatch/survive in cooler, but everything will be slower.
 
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Paper Spiders

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Ok frog friends,

@bitseriously, thank you so much for the links. I am pouring through them.

Some updates, the irresponsible parents are still mating. I have tried to remove many of the frog eggs, but my tank is very planted and it is NOT going to be possible to get them all. Not sure what to do. I think what i will do, is see if I can raise the majority of the tadpoles in a controlled environment (the bath/jar method, still setting that up) and I will try to also feed and care for the tadpoles in the tank when/if they hatch. The parents have refused to ever eat from the top of the aquarium (they wont even go for live mosquito larvae!) and I have a healthy culture of cyclops already in that tank, so...maybe.

The rest of the eggs are sitting at the same temp as the tank, and are waiting for their new home. I have some pictures, and I am very excited! I just need to get a BBS hatchery, and get going!

It's hard to see the eggs in these photos, but there are soooo many.
 
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Paper Spiders

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The tank is a bit of a mess, It was nicely aquascaped, but then I added some lights and the frogs, and I added a mess of floating plants to help handle the nitrates. My idea is to slowly remove the unsightly plants (looking at you, anacharis) as the other plants take hold. There is some algae, since the tank is by a window and we are getting more light, but I'm hoping the infusoria will take care of that. This tank has done very well maintaining its own equilibrium. Its had no filter, no heater and comparatively few water changes compared to my 20g aquarium. I'm now second guessing everything now that there may possibly tadpoles!
 

bitseriously

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I’m curious about your difficulty collecting the eggs. Are they not being laid at the surface, and floating? Mine might not float after transferring out of the original tank, but always remained at the top when laid.
 

bitseriously

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Ah I see.
That could almost make your work easier; just move the “host” plants, or even just parts of them (eg snip leaves or roots that have eggs attached), to the hatching container. Then after they hatch, remove any excess plant bits, leaving enough to harbour the infusoria.

Follow up note re baby brine shrimps: hatching them is typically a 24hr cycle. So don’t start till 24 hrs before you need them. I found I could get multiple partial collections even from small batches, meaning I could get 24 to 48 hours of feedings from a single batch.
So at hour zero I would start a batch of shrimp, I would collect the first small amounts 24 hours later, and make additional collections at 36 and 48 hrs, then discard the remainder. But start a new batch when the original one has hatched, so you have a constant supply. I had two brine shrimp hatching bottles, and rotated back-and-forth between them. I think I was using something like an eighth of a teaspoon of eggs per batch. But do bear in mind that those little baby brines are substantially more nutritious during the 6 to 12 hours immediately after hatching.
 
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