Stocking Question - What Makes A School? Do I Have Too Much?

James1978

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HI all:
My aquarium - 38 gallon tall with two Penguin 350's, Ammonia - 0 Nitrates 0, Nitrites 5 ppm (constant), pH 7.0, temp 79 degrees.

I currently have: 4 albino corys, 4 peppered corys, 3 platys.

My plan is to finish it off with two angelfish. Would that be too much for the tank? I was concerned that one angelfish would lend for a lonely life for him/her. I've read that angelfish aren't schooling, but they like to pair up. The other issue is, I heard if they don't pair up, they will kill each other???

Also, is 4 of each of the albinos and peppered corys enough for a school?

Lastly, I have a snail. I didn't buy it, but I must have gotten it as a straggler when I bought some live plants. Do I have to consider that for my tank capacity. He's small - like 1/2 inch tops.

Thanks!

James
 

AJE

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I would do at absolute minimum: 5 if each Cory. I would do one angel just Incase
 

FishFor2018

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So you do need 2+ more of each cory’s. If the angelfish don’t pair then yes they will kill one another. You can but established pairs but it’s a bit more expensive
 
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James1978

James1978

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So 6 albinos, 6 peppered, 3 platys, 1 angelfish in a 38 gallon - that is doable?

Also, any problems with having just one angelfish?

Thanks for the input so far

James
 

BottomDweller

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Peppered cories need much cooler water than angelfish. Peppered cories have a maximum temperature of 72f but do a lot better around 65-68f. Angels need 78-82f. Platies also need cooler water than angels. They need 67-77f with around 73f being ideal.
 

angelcraze

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The cories could be the same genus, in that case, the cories could be ok in those numbers. That would make a school of 8.

Can you post a pic of the albino cory so we can ID its genus? Do the albino and peppered cories hang out together? Or albinos with albino and peppered with peppered?
 

PubliusVA

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angelcraze said:
The cories could be the same genus, in that case, the cories could be ok in those numbers.
Practically all cories are in the same genus: the genus Corydoras. That's what makes them cories.
 

angelcraze

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It would be helpful if you could post a pic of the albino cories for ID

PubliusVA said:
Practically all cories are in the same genus: the genus Corydoras. That's what makes them cories.
Ok, the same strain then? The albino version of the same genus peppered. Surely you knew what I meant!
 

PubliusVA

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angelcraze said:
Ok, the same strain then? The albino version of the same genus peppered. Surely you knew what I meant?
Yes I see what you mean now. All the albino cories I've seen in local stores are albino versions of the bronze cory (Corydoras aeneus). But if the albinos James1978 has are the albino version of the peppered cory (Corydoras paleatus), then you're right, all 8 are actually the same species and should count as a single school of 8.
 
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James1978

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Wow I didn't know that - I will get a pic later tonight. The eight total corys don't really hang together. The albinos tank surf back and forth ALL day (so cute) and the peppered just tag together at the bottom. They even sleep together (also SO cute). If all 8 don't school, I guess I should get an extra two each? I'll add pics tonight, thanks
 

angelcraze

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Sounds like the albinos are probably aeneus, all the aeneus I've seen are very active, whereas the peppered variety tends to stay hidden more often. Oh well, let's see the pics
 

PubliusVA

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James1978 said:
Wow I didn't know that - I will get a pic later tonight. The eight total corys don't really hang together. The albinos tank surf back and forth ALL day (so cute) and the peppered just tag together at the bottom. They even sleep together (also SO cute). If all 8 don't school, I guess I should get an extra two each? I'll add pics tonight, thanks
Yeah if they don't school together they probably aren't the same species. Though I have panda cories that are clearly all the same species but for some reason tend to hang out in two separate groups. Try looking at their dorsal fins and see if they're the same shape. Peppered cories have more pointy dorsal fins while bronze cories have more rounded dorsal fins. If the fins look the same on both groups they're likely the same species, but if the albinos have more rounded dorsal fins than they're almost certainly albino aeneus.
 
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James1978

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Here's quite a few pics - they are hard to take of active fish The albinos are all so similar in size and look. I have two larger peppered corys - maybe 1.5 inches, and two smaller 1 inch ones, but they look very similar. There's one pic of the tank to show it in general. You can see the albinos sticking together mid tank near the right, and the peppered corys sticking to the bottom left near the driftwood.

Thanks for all the help!
 

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PubliusVA

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Yeah, I'm pretty sure that the albinos are C. aeneus, not C. paleatus like the peppered cories. Note how the dorsal fin is rounded on the back on the albinos in s 0651, 0652, and 0654, while the peppered cory in 0657 has a very triangular dorsal fin with a straight line on the back.
 
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James1978

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PubliusVA said:
Yeah, I'm pretty sure that the albinos are C. aeneus, not C. paleatus like the peppered cories. Note how the dorsal fin is rounded on the back on the albinos in s 0651, 0652, and 0654, while the peppered cory in 0657 has a very triangular dorsal fin with a straight line on the back.
So that would mean I should get 1 or 2 more of each, right?

Would 6 albinos, 6 peppered, 3 platys, and 2 angelfish be too much?

38 gallon tall, planted tank. 2 filters - Penguin 350's, will be switching one of the 350's with an EheI'm 2213 soon.

James
 

angelcraze

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Hmmm, I was just thinking angelfish like it warmer than cories. But if you are not breeding them, they don't have to be kept at 78/80°F. They can be kept at temps of 75/76°F, their metabolism would be slower (slower to grow up, less of an appetite, longer longevity), but there lower temps also reduce the immune, so keeping the tank clean with fresh water, the filters rinsed and substate siphoned becomes more important. I think cories are ok with 76°F, but I don't keep them myself because of my higher temps (I also keep rams).

One other possible issue is that platys are too innocent/cute/gentle to get out of the angelfish's way when they decide to breed. They don't seem to learn like tetras. Platys also do better in harder water. But sometimes fish can adjust to a happy medium, especially locally bred or tank raised fish.

I don't think it's too much in a nicely planted tank if you're prepared to change out water as often as you need to to keep the nitrates below 10ppm (I keep them lower) and TDS within 60 points of your tap water (as a general guide). My TDS stays within 90-120. Stock slowly and keep testing the water closely while stocking. That's my advice.
 
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James1978

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Sorry if this is a stupid question...what is TDS???
James
 

angelcraze

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Total Dissolved Solids. It gives you an idea of how soft your water is, but angelfish don't generally like a lot of minerals in the water. I just said 60 points higher than your tap to stress how changing water is important with angels. They can adjust to higher levels of minerals, especially if you're not intending to breed/raise them, but they still like fresh clean water.
 
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James1978

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I don't currently test the hardness/softness of water - just what comes with the API test kit: Ammonia/Nitrates/Nitrites/pH...I guess I'd have to buy a different test kit? Should I do that before purchasing an angelfish?
 

angelcraze

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Might be a good idea to order a TDS meter of Amazon or something. I've seen them for around 5$. I personally like to test my kh and gh. pH doesn't really tell us that.
 

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