Stocking ideas for a 20G Long tank.

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FredBjammin

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Looking for stocking ideas for my new 20G long tank;

I basically have 2 tanks devoted to community fish already, thinking about doing something different for the 20G long tank.

Stocking is still a month or two away, but I would like to know what kind of plants would do well in a shallow freshwater tank and some ideas on fish too, other then the kinds I have now.
 

mosin360

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I would recommend a single or a pair of Convict or Bolivian Rams Cichlids but I think they would tear up any real plants.
 

e_watson09

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Convicts and rams will also breed like rabbits so you'll want to make sure you'll have a place to take them before you set up for them.

You could divide it up and get some bettas
 
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FredBjammin

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Has anyone actually have had a problem with chichlids messing up plants? I have no intress in Bettas, I was thinking more along the lines of small carnivorous type fish or a not so "play nice with others" type fish. They would have to be compatable with plants of some kind.
 

bolivianbaby

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FredBjammin said:
Has anyone actually have had a problem with chichlids messing up plants? I have no intress in Bettas, I was thinking more along the lines of small carnivorous type fish or a not so "play nice with others" type fish. They would have to be compatable with plants of some kind.
Yep! I have. My rainbow cichlids are some of the best plant eaters. I had a GORGEOUS lily type plant (Harpua can tell you what it is) and they chewed it down to scraps.

My JD's, dwarf flag cichlids, and blue acara also eat plants. I'm sure others have done it as well, but those are the ones I know about.

If I'm not mistaken, Lake Tanganyika cichlids can be kept with plants, but verify that.

I'm sure you'll get some more ideas from other members as well.
 
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FredBjammin

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bolivianbaby said:
If I'm not mistaken, Lake Tanganyika cichlids can be kept with plants, but verify that.

I'm sure you'll get some more ideas from other members as well.
Tried to verify, but seem that I would have to figure out which kind of the 200 hundred differant kinds of Lake Tanganyika cichlids. Alot of info to digest.

Here's a sample of the main feeding cats those cichlids from the link at the bottom.

Pierre Brichard (p.76) has observed that Lake Tanganyika's cichlids fall into the following feeding categories:

Insectivorous fishes live close to the waters edge feeding on insects and their aquatic larvae.


Herbivorous rock-grazers feed mainly on the vegetal carpet of the biocover growing on the rocks.


Their diet also includes animal proteins supplied by the 'bugs' creeping among the algae.


Carnivorous biocover peckers live mainly on the 'bugs' they pick from the algal carpet.


Carnivorous zoobiocover peckers specialise in picking crustaceans and probably insect larvae from the tiny crannies on the rock surface.


Carnivorous zooplankton pickers live at ground level or in mid-water picking crustaceans as they hop by.


Phytoplankton pickers feed mainly on the drifting vegetal organisms of the plankton in mid-water.


Bivalve shell crushers feed on small bivalve molluscs.


Aquatic plant browsers feed on the limited plants.


Sand sifters scoop mouthfuls of sand with their forward slanted teeth, sift it through the gills, and eat the crustaceans hidden in it.


Diatom feeders feed on diatoms and shrimp developing on decaying organic matter on the deep floors.


Scale rippers have teeth that are set in such a way that they can seize the opposite edges of a scale on the side of a fish's body, apply pressure, and make it pop out of it's seating in the flesh. Skin, mucus and flesh are digested but the bony scale structure is not. Scale rippers will also attack open sores and wounds on disabled fish.


Macro-carnivores will attack any fishes that they can swallow whole.


Scavengers feed mainly or preferably on dead or disabled fishes.






Looks Like I have a lot more homework to do,
Thanks for your replies!
 

Jaysee

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How about a ctenapoma. The length of the tank is good, and as the only fish it will work fine.
 

angelfish220

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Chris123

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What about cocktoos or peacock gudgeons or maybe a pair of kribs would do nice

Chris
 

Elodea

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I second the African Butterfly Fish, just make sure there's a hood 'cause these guys are notorious jumpers.
 
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FredBjammin

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Jaysee said:
How about a ctenapoma. The length of the tank is good, and as the only fish it will work fine.
@jaysee: That's funny, when I google "ctenapoma" your fishlore profile page shows up like 4th on the list. I'll look into them some more.

That butterfly fish looks pretty cool, too.

I remember seeing something called like a "red tail shark" in a pet store down in ohio, It looked pretty cool and I believe it was fresh water and was related to the carp family somehow. Does anybody know what I am talking about or if something like that would be compatable with my 20 gallon long?

Thanks for all of your suggestion, I'll keep doing research on the fish you guys have already given me.
 

jetajockey

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Chris123 said:
What about cocktoos or peacock gudgeons or maybe a pair of kribs would do nice

Chris
woo I got 3 gudgeons today and I couldn't be happier, they are great, they flare at everything including me when I get right up on the tank.
 

Chris123

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jetajockey said:
woo I got 3 gudgeons today and I couldn't be happier, they are great, they flare at everything including me when I get right up on the tank.
that's where my idea came from your thread

I've been researching my self they sound pretty cool.

Sorry for the hijack fred
 
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FredBjammin

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Chris123 said:
that's where my idea came from your thread

I've been researching my self they sound pretty cool.

Sorry for the hijack fred
Don't worry about the hijack, looked up some picks of the peacock gudgeons, they might be just what I'm looking for. Glad you responded, since we live in the same area, did you find a place that sells them?
 

Jaysee

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FredBjammin said:
@jaysee: That's funny, when I google "ctenapoma" your fishlore profile page shows up like 4th on the list. I'll look into them some more.
That's because I have it spelled wrong It's ctenOpoma, not ctenApoma
 
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FredBjammin

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Jaysee said:
That's because I have it spelled wrong It's ctenOpoma, not ctenApoma
Thanks, cause I wasn't finding anything but blogs with the old spelling.

After reading up, now I'm torn between ctenopoma and the peacock gudgeons as Chris suggested.

Both indepth pages I read basically said the same thing about the ctenopoma (leopard bush fish), "They can be kept in a tank as small as 30 gallons if it is not overstocked, and has good filtration." Now would a single one or a pair do fine in a 20G long, and I'm asuming that if I go with them, I could use some of my left over guppy fry as food, right?
 

Jaysee

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There are a few different types of ctenopomas, some of which are bigger than others. Leopard bushfish is the spotten ctenopoma (aka african leaf fish). I think one by itself in a 20L will be fine. It'll hunt your guppy fry by pretending to be a leaf, and floating around the tank. If you want a hunter, this is your fish. Mine is SUPER aggressive and is no longer in the 55 with the african knife, senegal bichir and congo tetras.
 

jetajockey

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They had those leaf fish at a local petsmart that I went to yesterday and I was seriously tempted to get one ):

they had baby BGKs for super cheap too! was under 5 bucks iirc.
 

Jaysee

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I'm going to rehome mine and try again with a small one (ctenopoma). Hopefully it won't grow up to be so nasty.
 

Chris123

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FredBjammin said:
Don't worry about the hijack, looked up some picks of the peacock gudgeons, they might be just what I'm looking for. Glad you responded, since we live in the same area, did you find a place that sells them?
I don't know any places off the top of my head but if I find I place that sells them I will contact you
 
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