Stocking Guide

LHAquatics

LHAquatics submitted a new resource:

Stocking Guide - A guide to stocking you aquarium

Stocking an aquarium is one of the most asked question in this hobby.

To start I want to clear something up: the one inch per gallon rule. The rule states "for every inch of fish, you add a gallon of water". For example, a betta is 3 inches which means it can be in a 3 gallon tank. This also means an adult oscar (10-13in) is suitable for a 10 gallon. Or an angelfish in a 6 gallon. This is definitely not true and why this rule is a big myth. There just can't be 1 rule to determine how to...

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A201

It's always good to provide sensible & thoughtful information to those that need it.
 
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jinjerJOSH22

Hi, I like your article, like A201 says it's always good to see.
I have a couple of hmmn critiques(?), or my opinion on a couple of things.

On the "bigger is always better" this isn't always the case. While yes, with most species if you give them the space, fish will instinctively use it. Some fish benefit from smaller aquariums such as Licorice Gourami, where maintaining a larger aquarium to meet their high requirements due to the sensitivity of the fish can be quite the challenge, to the point keeping them in smaller tanks is safer.
Maybe not a fair point to linger on but this is one albeit extreme and specialist example.

The other thing I wanted to comment on is about the Gourami in the "aggressiveness" section. Yes, Gourami can be and are usually quite aggressive, however I want people to understand that some aggression is completely normal in a healthy setup. There are times where it's obviously not ok. Keeping very aggressive fish, such as domestic Betta Splendens males together or male Dwarf Gourami is almost never a success and will often end with dead fish.
The idea that Gourami are "territorial" is something I want to explore. Maybe it's not something that can be done in the home aquarium, where space is extremely limited. There is one point when you can call Gourami truly territorial and that is when a male is building and defending a bubble nest. Otherwise, most if not all are very social fish and should in my opinion be treated as such.
 
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LHAquatics

Hi, I like your article, like A201 says it's always good to see.
I have a couple of hmmn critiques(?), or my opinion on a couple of things.

On the "bigger is always better" this isn't always the case. While yes, with most species if you give them the space, fish will instinctively use it. Some fish benefit from smaller aquariums such as Licorice Gourami, where maintaining a larger aquarium to meet their high requirements due to the sensitivity of the fish can be quite the challenge, to the point keeping them in smaller tanks is safer.
Maybe not a fair point to linger on but this is one albeit extreme and specialist example.

The other thing I wanted to comment on is about the Gourami in the "aggressiveness" section. Yes, Gourami can be and are usually quite aggressive, however I want people to understand that some aggression is completely normal in a healthy setup. There are times where it's obviously not ok. Keeping very aggressive fish, such as domestic Betta Splendens males together or male Dwarf Gourami is almost never a success and will often end with dead fish.
The idea that Gourami are "territorial" is something I want to explore. Maybe it's not something that can be done in the home aquarium, where space is extremely limited. There is one point when you can call Gourami truly territorial and that is when a male is building and defending a bubble nest. Otherwise, most if not all are very social fish and should in my opinion be treated as such.
I briefly thought about that, but didn't know how to word it so I just kept it as is. Luckily, this is where we can discuss these kinds of things. I didn't know that bigger isn't always better. I will edit that. For the "gouramis are aggressive part" that was the only example I can come up with because it is a well known fish among non-hobbyists and hobbyists. Hopefully I worded that right
 
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BradleyH2O

Very insightful information...Thanks to all who contributed. I have a few questions/curiosities.

Assuming the stocked fish can coexist with the parameters given above, would you then fall back on the old adage that one inch per gallon?

What if you have a 100 gallon tank with 100 pounds of rock and substrate and lose approximately 10 gallons of water to displacement?

When calculating the amount of fish in your stock, do you use the measurement of the fish as it’s entering the aquarium or do you caculate using the maximum size of each individual species?
 
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LHAquatics

Very insightful information...Thanks to all who contributed. I have a few questions/curiosities.

Assuming the stocked fish can coexist with the parameters given above, would you then fall back on the old adage that one inch per gallon?

What if you have a 100 gallon tank with 100 pounds of rock and substrate and lose approximately 10 gallons of water to displacement?

When calculating the amount of fish in your stock, do you use the measurement of the fish as it’s entering the aquarium or do you caculate using the maximum size of each individual species?
I personally only go back to the inch per gallon rukle on nao fish (3in or less) if that is what you mean.

I sometimes see people lower the amount of water they have when they ask for stocking. For example I recently seen someone say I have a 63 gallon tank but to be safe let's say it is a a 55 gallon. The amount of water matter for water parameter wise, but space wise not as much. Depend on the tank tbh.

I calcuale fish maximum size unless I pan to upgrade when the fish gets full sized. For example I put a goldfish in a 20 gallon for a few months then upgrade to a bigger tank like a 40 or 55 when it gets larger.

Hopefully I answered al your questions. If you have any more, don't hesitate to ask :).
 
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Lucy

On the "bigger is always better" this isn't always the case.
Agreed
I briefly thought about that, but didn't know how to word it so I just kept it as is.

How about adding the word Almost......bigger is almost always better. :)
I know of a couple of examples but its not necessary to go into in my post.

Edit:
#2 isn't completely correct either. Sorry :/
"The less fish, the less maintenance" Totally depends on the fish.
 
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