Stocking a 10 gallon saltwater tank?

BRDrew

Hey Fishlore,

I'm a Freshwater keeper and want to get a Saltwater tank. I would like to start with a small 10 gallon Reef. Ive done some research and I understand all the equipment I need and I will build a custom light so I can grow some coral.

The thing I'm worried about is the fish. I have a small stock plan that is 1 firefish, 1 hectors goby (or a blenny), and a pair of small ocellaris clownfish. As for a clearning crew, I though about getting some crabs and 1 shrimp.

Is this too much for a 10g?

Please note that the tank is not yet build so please consider it as fully equiped with a small in-tank sump with biological media, a protein skimmer, heater and possibly even a 7w UV Sterilizer.
 

Tragic13

You may can get away with a 16g but I would recommend atleast a 20 gallon long tank for this stocking list.
 

ilovefishys17

Hey Fishlore,

I'm a Freshwater keeper and want to get a Saltwater tank. I would like to start with a small 10 gallon Reef. Ive done some research and I understand all the equipment I need and I will build a custom light so I can grow some coral.

The thing I'm worried about is the fish. I have a small stock plan that is 1 firefish, 1 hectors goby (or a blenny), and a pair of small ocellaris clownfish. As for a clearning crew, I though about getting some crabs and 1 shrimp.

Is this too much for a 10g?

Please note that the tank is not yet build so please consider it as fully equiped with a small in-tank sump with biological media, a protein skimmer, heater and possibly even a 7w UV Sterilizer.
To small to start with. I have lots of experience and even I can't keep a 10 gallon. If you do go with it test the water everyday, otherwise good luck. Also I would just do the 2 clownfish.
 

BRDrew

To small to start with. I have lots of experience and even I can't keep a 10 gallon. If you do go with it test the water everyday, otherwise good luck. Also I would just do the 2 clownfish.

I understand most people would say a 10 gallon is too small for someone starting is the Saltwater honny nut I'm fairly confident I can keep up with the tanks needs.

Also. Only the two clownfish for the 10 gallon or for the stocking no matter what nano tank size?
 

david1978

only the two clownfish. For the stocking you want you should have a 20 gallon tank for bio load.
 

LJC6780

I understand most people would say a 10 gallon is too small for someone starting is the Saltwater honny nut I'm fairly confident I can keep up with the tanks needs.

Also. Only the two clownfish for the 10 gallon or for the stocking no matter what nano tank size?

The reason we say start bigger is that parameters can swing in small sw tanks much more than in fw. Evaporation in a 10 gallon can swing SG by a lot in just 1 day. You'll definitely want an auto top off. And bio load can also swing parameters in such a small tank. I would personally start with something around 30 gallons until you learn the sw world and feel confident going smaller. The bigger the volume, the easier to keep everything stable.

We are talking ammonia, nitrites (mostly just at first for those two but not out of the question on a small tank) nitrates, calcium, alkalinity, magnesium, phosphates, pH and SG. All of these can change daily with fish and corals in a large tank and will just swing bigger in a small tank with less volume.

Also, what do you mean by in tank sump? Like a built in in the back? If so, that leaves even less space for fish and rock ... so I wouldn't do more than the clown pair.

If you are talking a separate tank as a sump, that will add volume and help keep things stable ... but not any more swimming room.
 

BRDrew

The reason we say start bigger is that parameters can swing in small sw tanks much more than in fw. Evaporation in a 10 gallon can swing SG by a lot in just 1 day. You'll definitely want an auto top off. And bio load can also swing parameters in such a small tank. I would personally start with something around 30 gallons until you learn the sw world and feel confident going smaller. The bigger the volume, the easier to keep everything stable.

We are talking ammonia, nitrites (mostly just at first for those two but not out of the question on a small tank) nitrates, calcium, alkalinity, magnesium, phosphates, pH and SG. All of these can change daily with fish and corals in a large tank and will just swing bigger in a small tank with less volume.

Also, what do you mean by in tank sump? Like a built in in the back? If so, that leaves even less space for fish and rock ... so I wouldn't do more than the clown pair.

If you are talking a separate tank as a sump, that will add volume and help keep things stable ... but not any more swimming room.

I mean built into the back of the tank.

And I know the parameters can chance very fast in a 10 gallon but most of those parameters are the ones I control for my freshwater tanks ever since I started breeding shrimp (that is othwr than salinity, phosphates and magnesium levels). But I'm not one for wasting my money so I probably Will get an auto top off.

I want to start with a 10 gallon because space is a limiting factor. I probably could try tô push for a 30 gallon but I much rather haverá a 10g.
 

ilovefishys17

I mean built into the back of the tank.

And I know the parameters can chance very fast in a 10 gallon but most of those parameters are the ones I control for my freshwater tanks ever since I started breeding shrimp (that is othwr than salinity, phosphates and magnesium levels). But I'm not one for wasting my money so I probably Will get an auto top off.

I want to start with a 10 gallon because space is a limiting factor. I probably could try tô push for a 30 gallon but I much rather haverá a 10g.
I get your point for the 10 gallon space. My advice is to just take it slow and easy. Also be careful with the water.
 

Tragic13

I mean built into the back of the tank.

And I know the parameters can chance very fast in a 10 gallon but most of those parameters are the ones I control for my freshwater tanks ever since I started breeding shrimp (that is othwr than salinity, phosphates and magnesium levels). But I'm not one for wasting my money so I probably Will get an auto top off.

I want to start with a 10 gallon because space is a limiting factor. I probably could try tô push for a 30 gallon but I much rather haverá a 10g.

If you want a 10 gallon then go ahead. We are not here to tell you what to do, but we can tell you that your stocking list is too much. The only thing you can fit in a 10g: 1 clownfish (maybe 2 if they pair up) or 1 goby and 1 firefish. Saltwater fish are aggressive, that the biggest difference and when you do not give fish room, they will fight, and kill each other. Same with corals, they are also aggressive. Some can put in toxins that crash a system. If you plan on having anemones you have to account for their size and that they will eat fish. We offer advice for people because they do not understand, coming from Freshwater to Saltwater is a night/day switch. You have more to factor in than just your normal parameters. You do water changes to add more supplements from the salt as well as clean the tank. You have to watch and position things around maybe multiple times until they find what is suitable. We are not trying to crush anyone's dreams and we understand budget/space. At the same time you have to respect the hobby and where we are coming from. good luck with your tank.
 

Nart

10G Saltwater tank is totally doable if you know what you are doing and it seems like you are fairly confident.

Like others have said though, that stocking is a bit too much for a 10G.
I would say, no more than 3 fishes max in it, but itll also depend on the kind of fish. 4 fishes might even work, say if you had all green banded gobies. But start off slow.
 

BRDrew

If you want a 10 gallon then go ahead. We are not here to tell you what to do, but we can tell you that your stocking list is too much. The only thing you can fit in a 10g: 1 clownfish (maybe 2 if they pair up) or 1 goby and 1 firefish. Saltwater fish are aggressive, that the biggest difference and when you do not give fish room, they will fight, and kill each other. Same with corals, they are also aggressive. Some can put in toxins that crash a system. If you plan on having anemones you have to account for their size and that they will eat fish. We offer advice for people because they do not understand, coming from Freshwater to Saltwater is a night/day switch. You have more to factor in than just your normal parameters. You do water changes to add more supplements from the salt as well as clean the tank. You have to watch and position things around maybe multiple times until they find what is suitable. We are not trying to crush anyone's dreams and we understand budget/space. At the same time you have to respect the hobby and where we are coming from. good luck with your tank.

Thanks for the advice. I understand how different Freshwater and Saltwater are and this is why I'm asking for opinions. I don't know how aggressive Saltwater fish can be but I was thinking about getting some clownfish that are already paired up (some fish stores in my areas sell them already paires). In this case I think I will probably go with a firefish + goby for starters and maybe get some clownfish when I'm able to get a larger tank. As far as corals I planned to avoid zoas for a while until I get some good research done and I don't plan on getting an anemones for my first Saltwater tank.

10G Saltwater tank is totally doable if you know what you are doing and it seems like you are fairly confident.

Like others have said though, that stocking is a bit too much for a 10G.
I would say, no more than 3 fishes max in it, but itll also depend on the kind of fish. 4 fishes might even work, say if you had all green banded gobies. But start off slow.

Do you think 1 clown, 1 firefish and 1 small goby would work?
 

LJC6780

Thanks for the advice. I understand how different Freshwater and Saltwater are and this is why I'm asking for opinions. I don't know how aggressive Saltwater fish can be but I was thinking about getting some clownfish that are already paired up (some fish stores in my areas sell them already paires). In this case I think I will probably go with a firefish + goby for starters and maybe get some clownfish when I'm able to get a larger tank. As far as corals I planned to avoid zoas for a while until I get some good research done and I don't plan on getting an anemones for my first Saltwater tank.

Actually, zoas are one of the easier corals to start with! They are soft and don't suck up the calcium, mag and Alk for a skeleton. Just research and wear protection when working with them or fragging. Otherwise they are fine. They come in all sorts of colors too ... also, don't require pristine water like some corals.

Just remember that clowns are damsels and damsels are known for being territorial and jerks at times. I like the idea of getting the smaller fish now and saving the clown pair for a larger tank. You might be able to do something like a yellow watchman goby and Randall's pistol shrimp combo.
 

BRDrew

Actually, zoas are one of the easier corals to start with! They are soft and don't suck up the calcium, mag and Alk for a skeleton. Just research and wear protection when working with them or fragging. Otherwise they are fine. They come in all sorts of colors too ... also, don't require pristine water like some corals.

Just remember that clowns are damsels and damsels are known for being territorial and jerks at times. I like the idea of getting the smaller fish now and saving the clown pair for a larger tank. You might be able to do something like a yellow watchman goby and Randall's pistol shrimp combo.

I know zoas aren't that hard to keep alive but I'm afraid to mishandle them and kill everything.

I like the shrimp + goby idea but I'm not sure how readily available the shrimp are in my area (I actually have never seen a Randall's pistol shrimp).
 

Tragic13

I know zoas aren't that hard to keep alive but I'm afraid to mishandle them and kill everything.

I like the shrimp + goby idea but I'm not sure how readily available the shrimp are in my area (I actually have never seen a Randall's pistol shrimp).


I think that combo would be awesome! Your LFS should be able to order you one, I think you would enjoy it!
 

LJC6780

I know zoas aren't that hard to keep alive but I'm afraid to mishandle them and kill everything.

I like the shrimp + goby idea but I'm not sure how readily available the shrimp are in my area (I actually have never seen a Randall's pistol shrimp).

If by everything you mean yourself, ok ... just be cautious and you'll be fine. Wear gloves and eye protection ... don't ever boil equipment or rocks that have had zoas or palys as they could contain toxins.

As far as killing everything in the tank ... I've not heard of that happening. I don't know that they are toxic to the corals and fish like an anemone hitting a powerhead would be. They really are a pretty safe option as far as a tank goes. They don't move around, just add new polyps and grow a mat over the rock or plug they are on.

Really, anemones are the only ones you have to worry about moving around. Well. I've had my large ricordea yuma mushrooms migrate around a rock but not like an anemone does. It happens very slowly over time as they stretch and open to get the light they want.

I know zoas aren't that hard to keep alive but I'm afraid to mishandle them and kill everything.

I like the shrimp + goby idea but I'm not sure how readily available the shrimp are in my area (I actually have never seen a Randall's pistol shrimp).

I say Randall's because I've heard they are much less aggressive than tiger pistols. I've heard of tigers actually killing other fish in the tank. I think Randall's just stick with their goby and leave everyone else alone.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
61
Views
5K
Jesterrace
Replies
6
Views
1K
DocRick
Replies
7
Views
991
tanki60o
Replies
36
Views
793
Jesterrace
Replies
5
Views
1K
r4fish17

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom