Stock 125 Mbuna Tank

mikkicvp
  • #1
I'm pretty new to Mbunas. I've had yellow labs in a 40 breeder for two years, but I just upgraded to a 125. It came with 3 yellow tail aceis, 5 cobalt zebras, and 5 red peacock fry (currently growing out in a 5), plus the 6 yellow labs that I already had. I'd like to try adding the peacocks when they're bigger, but worst case they can go in the 40 breeder. My question is what else should I add? And how many fish would be fully stocked?

I'm for sure looking for rusties. I'd also like to find something dark blue like demosani. I'm a little concerned demosani might be too aggressive though, especially if I stick with the peacocks going in the 125. What are your experiences with demosani? Or what are some similarly colored less aggressive species? What other species should I look at to add more color variety?
 

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jmaldo
  • #2
"Welcome" to the Forum. I am planning an African Cichlid build, so your title caught my eye. No real help I can give right now. But I have been following a few threads and A201 and MacZ have been offering informative advice.

Will be Watching.
 

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A201
  • #3
A six foot, 125 gallon opens up quite a few options. To start, build a complex & elevated hardscape, preferably Limestone, leaving the mid to upper levels of the tank open for Peacocks & Haps. Four inches of small grain gravel or sand substrate.
Mbuna love to dig & it helps stabilize rocks.
I'm not big on Mbuna breeding colonies, but do keep select male Mbuna like Zebra Chalumba, Purple Afra, Blue fin Red Zebra & Rusties.
Look at male Haps like the Red Empress, Nimbochromis Fusco & Livingstoni, Steveni Taiwan Reef & Borleyi. Plenty of blue coloration there. Look forward to updates.
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mikkicvp
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
To start, build a complex & elevated hardscape, preferably Limestone, leaving the mid to upper levels of the tank open for Peacocks & Haps. Four inches of small grain gravel or sand substrate.

I already have pool filter sand as my substrate. Right now I know I don't have enough rocks, just a random collection of ones I already had, but I just got a bunch of limestone that I'm going to build some rock piles with. It came from a corn field though, so I know I need to wash it really well before trying to use it. And it has some sharp edges that I need to file down. But soon my tank will have plenty of hiding spots.

Look at male Haps like the Red Empress, Nimbochromis Fusco & Livingstoni, Steveni Taiwan Reef & Borleyi. Plenty of blue coloration there. Look forward to updates.

Do male Haps do well in a tank that has mbuna females if they don't have their own females? Those really are beautiful fish! I saw some blue dolphin moorii very reasonably priced near me, and was quite tempted. But I was nervous to add haps to a mbuna tank. I was also unsure how I'd feed the haps a separate diet from the mbunas.
 
A201
  • #5
I keep Haps, Peacocks & Mbuna together in a 120 gal. long. I try to keep males only, but I buy juveniles & sometimes it's difficult to ID males that young. As a result a few females made their way in.
The Mbuna chase each other & defend their territories. They pretty much ignore the big Haps & Peacocks.
Females being present cause nest building / digging holes & temporary periods of aggression.
IMO, adult male Haps are the most interesting, and do well in long tanks.
 
MacZ
  • #6
I already have pool filter sand as my substrate. Right now I know I don't have enough rocks, just a random collection of ones I already had, but I just got a bunch of limestone that I'm going to build some rock piles with. It came from a corn field though, so I know I need to wash it really well before trying to use it. And it has some sharp edges that I need to file down. But soon my tank will have plenty of hiding spots.
Do male Haps do well in a tank that has mbuna females if they don't have their own females? Those really are beautiful fish! I saw some blue dolphin moorii very reasonably priced near me, and was quite tempted. But I was nervous to add haps to a mbuna tank. I was also unsure how I'd feed the haps a separate diet from the mbunas.

First off: Welcome!

I wouldn't use the rocks from the field. They are likely soaked with fertilizers, which you don't want in a tank that has no plants. They would likely leach the ferts and you will ask yourself why you have nitrates and ammonia rising.
The peacocks won't be interested in the Mbuna females, but the presence of females (and their pheromones) may also highten the peacocks' aggression. Might. Not sure if it really will.
Good that you mention the diet problem yourself: Mbunas should never under any circumstances be fed red mosquito larvae aka bloodworms.
I always tried to not mix Mbuna and Peacocks/Haps. Peacocks can do for a while with a less protein rich diet, I would rather think about going full Mbuna and return the peacocks.
 
qldmick
  • #7
NLS Algaemax is great for mbuna. You can feed both algaemax and probiotix so all fish get what they need.
I just have haps and peacocks these days (star sapphires and albino dragon bloods) but I still avoid bloodworms, they get mysis shrimp or brine shrimp several times a week.
 
Islandvic
  • #8
mikkicvp , welcome to the forum. I just saw your thread. Although I don't have a 125g, I do have a 55g African tank.


To add to the list of A201's excellent suggestions for stocking...

Maingano
Red Exasperatus
Yellow Top Mbamba
Yellow Tail Acai
Red Top Ndumbi
Green Afra Mbweca
Cobalt Blue Zebra
Ice Blue Zebra
Orange Cobue Afra
Jalo Reef Afra

I have those fish except for last 2.

My Africans get fed cucumber slices 1x a week, get 1 day of no food, then get a rotation of Ken's Fish house brand of Veggie Flakes, Intense Spirulina Flakes, 3.5mm cichlid pellets and intense spirulina mini-sticks.
 

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