Starting Pressurized Co2 Tomorrow

jehorton

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I got all my plants in for the redone 125 and tomorrow I will plant them all. I have opted to make this tank my first CO2 injection tank with a NilocG reactor. My questions are :

Is there an accurate way to measure CO2 ppm in the tank? I have two drop checkers and heard they aren’t as reliable. Measuring PH is another method but when does one measure and how many times a day ? The tank will have an over abundance of plants so hopefully algae will not be an issue. Also this tank will not have livestock until I find equilibrium
 

Nick72

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I got all my plants in for the redone 125 and tomorrow I will plant them all. I have opted to make this tank my first CO2 injection tank with a NilocG reactor. My questions are :

Is there an accurate way to measure CO2 ppm in the tank? I have two drop checkers and heard they aren’t as reliable. Measuring PH is another method but when does one measure and how many times a day ? The tank will have an over abundance of plants so hopefully algae will not be an issue. Also this tank will not have livestock until I find equilibrium
Very good questions and ones I have been looking at recently.

I know of no accurate way to directly measure C02 ppm.

The only options I'm aware of are:

Use a drop Checker (I find these inaccurate and slow to change).

Use a KH table to estimate C02 ppm given a reading of both KH and PH (both readings can be hard to achieve with accuracy, and the table is only accurate if Ca and Mg are the only elements buffering your water - I found this method wildly inaccurate).

Monitor your PH - check PH immediately prior to when the C02 turns on. Measure your PH 3 hours later. Aim for a 1 point drop in PH over the 3 hours, which should indicate 30ppm C02
(This is the method I'm using - I'm still not completely convinced)

I invested in an Ista PH Monitor and quickly realised that the PH solution tests are highly inaccurate, mainly due to our ability to perceive the colour changes, but also effected by Expectation Bias.
 
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jehorton

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Very good questions and ones I have been looking at recently.

I know of no accurate way to directly measure C02 ppm.

The only options I'm aware of are:

Use a drop Checker (I find these inaccurate and slow to change).

Use a KH table to estimate C02 ppm given a reading of both KH and PH (both readings can be hard to achieve with accuracy, and the table is only accurate if Ca and Mg are the only elements buffering your water - I found this method wildly inaccurate).

Monitor your PH - check PH immediately prior to when the C02 turns on. Measure your PH 3 hours later. Aim for a 1 point drop in PH over the 3 hours, which should indicate 30ppm C02
(This is the method I'm using - I'm still not completely convinced)

I invested in an Ista PH Monitor and quickly realised that the PH solution tests are highly inaccurate, mainly due to our ability to perceive the colour changes, but also effected by Expectation Bias.
I spent a good amount of time last night researching PH meters since they seem to be more accurate and readings in seconds, though any meter I saw had some good reviews and some very bad ones. I have yet to find one under $100 without very bad reviews. I did see ISTA ph meter and that looked great.
 

Nick72

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I spent a good amount of time last night researching PH meters since they seem to be more accurate and readings in seconds, though any meter I saw had some good reviews and some very bad ones. I have yet to find one under $100 without very bad reviews. I did see ISTA ph meter and that looked great.
I stand by the Ista PH meter, it's been very accurate.

The only issue I've had is the calibration fluid supplied with mine had expired and was not holding the 4 PH for calibration.

It was easy and cheap to buy some 4 PH and 6.9 PH calibration sachets (mix with 250ml of distilled water).

Mine cost around $85 USD here in Malaysia - money well spent IMO
 
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