Stabilizing My Tank (warning: Long)

RSababady
  • #41
The rule of thumb is 1 inch (tip to tip) of fish needs 1 gallon of water.
So if your fish size for example:
5 x neons = 5 (fish) x 1,25 (inches) x 1 (g) = 6,25 gallons
5 x cories = 5 x 2 x 1 = 10 gallons

Exceptions of course are goldfish where you need about 2-2,5 gallons per inch of fish and fish that can only live alone (bettas)

In terms of filtration, what you need to calculate is:
  • HOB filter - 5 - 7 x water flow of the filter when loaded with media (gallons or litres per hour)
  • Canister filter - 2-3 x water flow of the filter when loaded with media (gallons or litres per hour)
Most filters give the pump water flow and not the filter loaded with media water flow. If this is the case for your filter, just divide the pump waterflow by 2

All ballpark figures - but it gets you roughly into the place you need to be

Hope this is useful.
 

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Lisa Gergets
  • Thread Starter
  • #42
Very useful, thank you!

I am hopeful that we've turned a corner with the BB, based on today's readings:

pH: 6.8
Ammonia: 2
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 10

So even though the ammonia is still up, it appears the nitrite/nitrates are stabilizing. That's a good sign, yes?

BTW all fish are amazingly healthy, considering. They are all vibrant in color, and active. The male guppy was developing suspicious white spots on his beautiful dark blue tail a few days back, but it's disappeared and he looks completely healthy now.
 

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RSababady
  • #43
Just looking at your readings and comparing them with the last readings:

: 6.8 (6.8)
: 2 ppm (2)
: 0.25 ppm (0)
: 20 ppm (10)


Have you done a WC? If not, then the drop in nitrates indicates that you have plants in the tank consuming the nitrates. The drop of Nitrites indicates that the Nitrite oxidising bacteria is growing. The stable ammonia indicates that your ammonia oxidising bacteria is growing slowly - i.e. it is oxidising the same amount of bioload produced by the fish.

So this is good news. Try to avoid any changes until the ammonia and nitrites drop to zero.

Good job
 
Lisa Gergets
  • Thread Starter
  • #44
RSababady
  • #45
I would avoid WC with those parameters........ Interesting that the nitrates have gone down if you don't have live plants (sorry - forgot about that). Something ate p the nitrates...... this could only be bacteria if you have no live plants and not done a WC. This kind of bacteria is actually quite hard to grow, as it is anaerobic. So you probably have are doing a good job - just hold in there and try not to change the water conditions - just monitor them. If Nitrates go above 20 or ammonia above 4 or nitrites above 5, then do a partial WC. Otherwise, patience, patience, patience - I know it is hard, but it will all benefit the tank in the long run.

btw - try and do your tests at a similar time of time to avoid natural fluctuations (yes they are small) associated with day/night.
 
Lisa Gergets
  • Thread Starter
  • #46
Thank you so much! These past few days, I've just had a feeling to leave everything alone, based on how my fish are acting. Well, I also have a wrist injury so I'm working one-handed, so I've been avoiding it, too. Lol
 

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