SPS / LPS Lighting Requirements

mikegip

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10,000 K and an 420/460 nm actinic T8 combined are a nice hugh of light for a FOWLR tank. It's a nice light to view fish, not enough lighting for coral due to the fact that that type lighting is a thing of the past but will be plenty for fish and you will enjoy the light.

could u tell me the suitable to coral?
Lps or Sps?

12000K or more white light?
and Blue?
 

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Mikegip, this is your new thread.

Typically SPS will do well under a 14000k or greater Metal Halide, supported by 420nm Actinics.

LEDs can work too, and my SPS seem to be doing well.

LPS aren't as demanding, and should also do well under the same lighting.

Just as important in SPS/LPS tanks (particularly SPS) is the management of parameters, NO3, PO4, Mg, Ca, Alk and trace elements.

Not to mention flow rates of at least 40x the tank volume for SPS.
 

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Mikegip, this is your new thread.

Typically SPS will do well under a 14000k or greater Metal Halide, supported by 420nm Actinics.

LEDs can work too, and my SPS seem to be doing well.

LPS aren't as demanding, and should also do well under the same lighting.

Just as important in SPS/LPS tanks (particularly SPS) is the management of parameters, NO3, PO4, Mg, Ca, Alk and trace elements.

Not to mention flow rates of at least 40x the tank volume for SPS.

Thanks .Ryanr
Your info is very helpful
 
10,000 K is for a depth in the ocean of 5-15 feet deep and 14K is 8-20 feet of depth, so there for the 10 is brighter for higher needs of lighting for certain types of corals and this differs from certain areas of the ocean. It actually boils down to the type of light used and its wattage usage. This also does not mean that a T-8 or T-5 puts out the same amount of light but refers to the Lux spectrum that the bulb actually can put out. If you take a Metal hilide verses a say for instance a T-5 there is no match compared to a comapact floresant or what ever the case may be. The higher the Lux factor is the brighter the bulb can produce and keep in mind that not all bulbs will tell you this on the package you have to contact the manufacture in order to do so. I know very confussing but it is what happens with bulbs trying to interpet natural lighting.
 
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  • #5
10,000 K is for a depth in the ocean of 5-15 feet deep and 14K is 8-20 feet of depth, so there for the 10 is brighter for higher needs of lighting for certain types of corals and this differs from certain areas of the ocean. It actually boils down to the type of light used and its wattage usage. This also does not mean that a T-8 or T-5 puts out the same amount of light but refers to the Lux spectrum that the bulb actually can put out. If you take a Metal hilide verses a say for instance a T-5 there is no match compared to a comapact floresant or what ever the case may be. The higher the Lux factor is the brighter the bulb can produce and keep in mind that not all bulbs will tell you this on the package you have to contact the manufacture in order to do so. I know very confussing but it is what happens with bulbs trying to interpet natural lighting.
Thanks Stang Man

What is different between Blue light and white light?
different bright or penetration?
Which Ratio is better?
More answers is appreciate
 
The daylight which you are refering to as white is 10,ooo K which is a clean light and are used the most by some, however by changing to a daylight with 14,000 K there is a hugh of blueish tint from the bulb I use this because it looks better and also gives that blueish spectrum that certain corals thrive on. Know for the ( Blue) which is an actinic light these lights are for either a mix with a daylight bulb or can be used as a dawn and dusk type setting. I have metal hilides for my tanks on the 30 I use a 150 watt with a 14K bulb and that is all on the 70 I use a 250 watt MH with a 10k and also a stunner actinic LED I use these for dawn to dusk lighting.
 

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The daylight which you are refering to as white is 10,ooo K which is a clean light and are used the most by some, however by changing to a daylight with 14,000 K there is a hugh of blueish tint from the bulb I use this because it looks better and also gives that blueish spectrum that certain corals thrive on. Know for the ( Blue) which is an actinic light these lights are for either a mix with a daylight bulb or can be used as a dawn and dusk type setting. I have metal hilides for my tanks on the 30 I use a 150 watt with a 14K bulb and that is all on the 70 I use a 250 watt MH with a 10k and also a stunner actinic LED I use these for dawn to dusk lighting.
Thank you very much !

I think a dimming control light can do much.
Like Radion RW 30
Very powerful .I see some vedio of it...
 
  • #10
Yeah those are good LED lights for sure and I have read about them in my magazine very high quality lighting.....
 
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  • #11
Yeah those are good LED lights for sure and I have read about them in my magazine very high quality lighting.....
Also very expensive lights
 
  • #12
Well you can say that for sure but if you put the facts together you will not need to buy bulbs every 8 months or so and will last for a good 5+ years if not more and will also save on your energy bill a ton of cash. This is why the LED lighting has taken a better phase of things is energy usage and the fact that they last 25,000 or so hours that's a lot of hours with out replacement.
 

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